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Just saw another story about a local guy around here in Vermont (on vacation from PA) killed by an exhaust leak. He had the parts to get it fixed, but killed him before he got the chance.

We have several in our house, seems like it would be useful to have one in the cabin of older cars where hidden exhaust problems can pop up unexpectedly.

Any reason why there isn't a push for it?
 

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WAY too many false trips from picking up exhaust through the vents at idle. You ARE actually exposed to CO while driving. Buy a detector and place it in your car for your commute, see if it goes off.
 

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Bob Lincoln said:
WAY too many false trips from picking up exhaust through the vents at idle. You ARE actually exposed to CO while driving. Buy a detector and place it in your car for your commute, see if it goes off.
I guess calibration is more of the issue. I understand the issues of both dose and duration of CO ala biochemistry (as one may get past the point of no return and die even if removed from the CO exposure), but couldn't the parameters be set higher if exposure is expected?
 

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There's no market for it, since it's not regulated, and the only risks are from negligence, typically, not from normal operation.
 

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Once again it becomes a nanny state question of how many times a person being protected against himself. As you stated, the person knew of the problem with his exhaust system and didn't get it fixed. Why does everyone have to then pay because one person wasn't smart enough to take care of himself? Why would everyone have to pay for his mistake. It is called survival of the fittest for a reason. Sorry to sound so cold, but there are enough stupid things we all have to pay for because of one person's mistake. If you want a carbon monoxide sensor in your car, you have the opportunity to put one in your own car, which is the way it should be, not force everyone else to pay for one.
 
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And now we have mandatory tire pressure sensors, because some people are too lazy to fill their tires, and the government has decided that that 3% reduction in gas mileage in *some* vehicles warrants legislating a correction. I've been told that a valve stem with a sensor in it can cost $60.
 

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Bob Lincoln said:
And now we have mandatory tire pressure sensors, because some people are too lazy to fill their tires, and the government has decided that that 3% reduction in gas mileage in *some* vehicles warrants legislating a correction. I've been told that a valve stem with a sensor in it can cost $60.
I was at a gas station, and I noticed the lady next to me at the other pump putting gas into her Cadillac Escallade had an almost flat tire on the front of her Caddy. It looked like maybe it had 10 psi at the most. I told her about it. "Oh thanks, honey, but my husband has known about it for 2 weeks, he's a busy man -- very important, so he just hasn't gotten around to fixing it", she said in a condescending fashion.

I replied: "I wouldn't trust that tire if you've been driving for 2 weeks on it like that. You need to go to a tire shop and get a new tire or at least get some air in it." She then sighed and didn't reply. I guess she believes it must not be a big deal since her husband doesn't seem to care if she has a blow out on the highway and crashes. Who knows, maybe he's mortgaged up to the hilt and has a large life insurance policy out on this ditzy lady. :)

I think a lot of so called "accidents" are caused by idiots who don't maintain their cars.
 

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They say you can't legislate stupid, right?
 

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So very true, and we keep letting them do it, so I guess it is true.
 

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In the olden days, my brother owned a Volkswagen Beetle. The heater used the engine exhaust for heat with a sheet metal manifold over the exhaust muffler. The exhaust would rust out, and dump both heat and raw exhaust carbon monoxide into the cabin. One trip in below zero weather sticks in my memory. Me and 4 other teenagers were in the car, trying to just get home. The windshield and the other windows were frosted over, and the driver couldn't see where he was going. We would have to turn on the defroster/heater just to see out the window, till we could not could not stand the poisonous fumes. Then the windows got cracked open letting in fresh cold air, and letting out precious heat. We alternated between freezing then toxic gases and back to freezing to death. All of us survived, don't know how... with no sissy CO detector but our noses..
 

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CO is odorless and invisible. Car exhaust has very, very little odor these days. Not a good idea to trust your noses. I resuscitated a teen who was in cardiac arrest from CO from car exhaust once. People do still die from CO in exhaust, there was a child who died less than a week ago while sitting in an idling car that had an exhaust obstructed by snow.
 

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And yes, people still die from making the wrong decision. Each of these cases has been a case of operator poor judgement, but still not something everyone should have to pay for because of a few people with poor judgement. Seatbelts are one thing, can't control another person hitting you, but cars have been around long enough to know things like this kill people. Not like this is an event that just started showing up or will ever go away. Bells and whistles can be disabled and ignored, but people still lock their keys in their cars, so some of these safety items still don't work, as an example.
 

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I think a lot of these problems stem from people not knowing the nature of materials or basic mechanics. Like the awesome book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. The writer noticed that very few people around him knew basic facts about materials and physics and such; I'm not talking about difficult math or physics but just basic facts about objective materials.

One of his motorcycling buddies had a BMW motorcycle, and the handlebars kept slipping which is dangerous. So the writer of the book, Robert Pirsig, told his friend "let me fix your handlebars." Pirsig had an aluminum can and was slicing it up to use as shims in his friend's handlebars, and then tighten down the handlebar bolts to deform the aluminum and create a tight hold. His friend freaked out: "you won't fix MY BMW with a pop can!" Pirsig explained that the dealership would also use aluminum shims. But his friend refused to let him fix the handlebars and continued to ride the motorcycle with loose handlebars until he was able to get into the BMW dealership. This prompted him to write the book in the first place.

I'm sure a lot of us know stubborn people who refuse to wear seatbelts. "I don't want to be stuck in a burning car with a jammed seatbelt!" But they don't get the fact that without the seatbelt, they probably would be knocked out inside the vehicle anyway, so they'd burn up inside the vehicle. Or they'd be thrown out of the window and die that way. It's basic physics. One idiot told me once: "I don't wear seatbelts because if I get into an accident, I want to be thrown clear of the accident and into a safe area." lol, yeah right buddy.
 

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Like the travel lane of a highway.

You are 25 times more likely to die when 'thrown clear'.
 

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Bob Lincoln said:
CO is odorless and invisible. Car exhaust has very, very little odor these days. Not a good idea to trust your noses. I resuscitated a teen who was in cardiac arrest from CO from car exhaust once. People do still die from CO in exhaust, there was a child who died less than a week ago while sitting in an idling car that had an exhaust obstructed by snow.
The odor of the exhaust in the cab of that worn out 1960's VW was extremely smelly, even though the deadly CO is odorless. If not for the noxious odor, we'd of all been killed and flash frozen.
 

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When I was 5 years old our family was our family car developed an exhaust leak in the middle of the desert at night and was venting up into the back seat where I was sitting. I was pretty sick and my parents moved me to the front seat. This was in the days before airbags, mandating children in car seats in the back, and cell phones.

I don't recall much about it except that I got to spend a fair bit of time in the ER at a hospital and got to drink all the pop I wanted to. At 5 years old, I thought was pretty cool and a nice change from throwing up.
 

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All I can say is, thank goodness I live someplace that vehicle rust is not an issue...

I do see why some states, especially states with vehicle rust issues, have vehicle inspections. We generally don't need them here, though there are enough people running around with burned-out brake lights that sometimes I wish that there were more enforcement.
 

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TWX said:
All I can say is, thank goodness I live someplace that vehicle rust is not an issue...

I do see why some states, especially states with vehicle rust issues, have vehicle inspections. We generally don't need them here, though there are enough people running around with burned-out brake lights that sometimes I wish that there were more enforcement.
It's pathetic here in Ohio, there are no vehicle inspections, safety checks, or smog checks (at least in my county). You see some people driving around in rusted out jalopies with burned out headlights, brake lights, or turn signals. I've witnessed 3 or 4 cars having a tie rod break on them on the highway, and the resulting crashes.
 

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jd_1138 said:
It's pathetic here in Ohio, there are no vehicle inspections, safety checks, or smog checks (at least in my county). You see some people driving around in rusted out jalopies with burned out headlights, brake lights, or turn signals. I've witnessed 3 or 4 cars having a tie rod break on them on the highway, and the resulting crashes.
Heh. I do occasionally see rusted out jalopies here. They're either snowbirds or transplants.
 
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