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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using Castrol for some time.

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I was told here by a very wise man that I trust their opinion. .... The Castrol only meets 3 of 5 SAE requirements. For my 1993 Caravan.

So I'm in the process of switching my 3 vehicles from Castrol to Walmart Super tech. I change oil Fall & spring by the seasons not by the miles ....

The reason why I'm making a controversial post, over on the P-15-D-24 we have a discussion going on about Castrol GTX new classic blend oil with extra zinc added.

My opinion is, Castrol never did meet the SAE requirements for a 30 year old Dodge 3.3 V6 ..... Why would I want to use the new blend in my flathead 6 cyl engine?

Just asking what others opinion on Castrol GTX is?
 

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Ive been using Castrol forever in all of my vehicles and have never had any issues. Switched from the GTX to the high mileage, then to the Edge synthetic. Also, ive always used Fram filters, amd again no issues whatsoever.

Vehicles
2003 Dodge Dakota 3.9
2003 Dodge Ram 1500 3.7
2014 Dodge Charger 3.6
1991 Dodge D150 318
 

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In my "professional tourist" days. I logged many, many hours at oil refineries. Castrol was one of Dexter Petroleum's near New Orleans. biggest clients.

I've watched Citgo at Cicero, IL fill Phipps 66 bottles, Exxon Superflo, Mobil bottles. Exxon in Baytown won't fill a Mobil bottle for a gas station in Cheyenne. They'll call Sinclaire in Wyoming and have Sinclare fill the order. Exxon may specify an additive package, they may not. Synthetic is a different ball game. Mobil 1 comes from 1 place.
 

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I used to work for BP for several years shortly after they bought Amoco and Castrol Oil. I remember on occasion having conversations with the chemists and engineers where we had a test track, and they would test fuel additives and lubricants. Often, manufacturers will not always pay up or spend the resources needed to test and affirm that they meet each individual auto maker's specs, like Mopar MS-6395. When the Viper was first produced in the 1990s, the factory fill and recommended oil was Mobil 1. During the whole Daimler/Cerberus/Fiat fiascos, the "marketing agreements" changed from Mobil for lubricants, and BP for gas, to Pennzoil/Shell. Oddly, the crappier Mobil Super oils did meet Mopar MS-6395 spec, but not Mobil 1 or Mobil 1 EP. Anyone here actually think that Mobil Super regular motor oil is BETTER than the advanced full synthetics? It was a case of Mobil being pissed off they got tossed for Shell and didn't care or bother to go through the rigid testing just to prove it met that spec. In my '06 Hemi Daytona, I used nothing but either M1 or M1 EP 5W20 since new with absolutely ZERO engine issues, or loud ticks/noises, whereas trying the "recommended" Pennzoil Platinum and even Ultra Platinum resulted in louder clatter on cold start-ups, and not just on my Hemi, but our puny 2.4L in our Jeep, resulting in a quick switch back to M1 products since new.

The engineers and chemists I used to talk to said these marketing games go on all the time. As mentioned above, for many, many years, I have successfully used Castrol GTX in a lot of old Mopars - both HP and grocery-getters. I do know that the Wally World Super Tech full synthetic stuff in most common weights meet the Mopar spec, plus other specs. As also mentioned, I think it is most important to remember that if you have an older flat tappet engine from the 80s or older to remember that even if you use the most expensive full synthetics from today, you need to use a ZDDP additive with each oil change, and a crap-ton if breaking in new cam/lifters. I know a lot of people have been down on Fram oil filters because of some bursting issues they had a few decades ago, but that was quickly resolved. I used to use a lot of Frams in my older cars with no issues, and have occasionally used the high-end Fram Ultras on the little 2.4 with no issues. On the Hemi, and our '21 DD 3.6, I always use a Mopar filter with the M1 EP oil. I think the most important issue when choosing an oil is choosing the correct weight, go with a synthetic if possible (Wally World Super Tech is as cheap or cheaper than most regular brand dino oils), it meets the required API spec, use a quality filter, and change it on a regular interval not exceeding 6K or 7K miles (or spring and fall as I do on the wife's vehicles as she doesn't drive a lot of miles). I've learned that the whole "Does it meet the MS-6395 spec?" question is less relevant. M1 now meets that spec, but during the past several years, when looking at the low-cost oils that DID meet the spec, I just laughed.

FWIW, just from my own experience, I do know that about the only fuel additive available off the shelf to the DIY person that really does anything is Chevron Techron. I remember discussing this with the chemists at BP, and they said that before the BP days, Amoco used to use it in their fuels, and it was excellent stuff, but it got cut when BP took over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess I'm really not sure what to think now about Castrol ... Seems to be some pretty good opinions on it.

My father was a mechanic back in the days where we had service stations with a mechanic on duty. He always used Quaker state. .... That stuff will sludge up a engine fast.
As I got older I learned penzoil will do the exact same thing. I'm not sure but I think it is oil that uses paraffin that causes the sludge? .... Maybe today with most oils synthetic it just does not matter ... I dunno.
I chose Castrol because I believed it did not have paraffin.

Same time I'm kinda disappointed in it. I have a Chevy truck that I drive less then 6k miles a year, owned it for 5 years, I change the oil fall & spring.
I imagine it has about 1500 miles on it now & will change it in September .... It just looks dirty. Always looks dirty.
I guess thats just a characteristic of Castrol I should be use to.

7 or 8 years ago I was selling a work van with a good motor/bad transmission. Cheap. I drove it for over 10 years nothing but Castrol .... Was a factory crate engine when I bought it and ran very well. Passed all emission standards.
A potential customer wanted the 351 4bbl engine for his own project, He took one look at the oil and refused to stay around to hear it run. Thats Castrol for you.

I Dunno maybe I cant complain & just looking for a exscuse to change oil brands.
 

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I used to use Castrol exclusively in my 69 Polara. 383 2bbl carb. I never had any issues between 3,000 mile oil changes, but I also noticed that it looked dirty after just a few days of driving. I talked to several people that used it back in the 70's also and everyone said that was just a characteristic of Castrol. I used Castrol up until around the early 90's in all of my vehicles and never had an engine failure. I got away from it and started using Mobil1 around 94 and have used it pretty much exclusively since then. Nothing against Castrol, but I usually get a better deal on the Mobil1 in the 5 quart container than I can get the Castrol full synthetic for.
 

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When I started racing oval track back in 1992 I used Castrol oil. I took my engine to get refreshed that winter and the engine builder called me after he tore it apart and he said it looks like you are using Castrol oil. I told him that I was and he said don't ever use that again it's the worst oil on the market for a race engine. So I've never used it since, and I didn't ask why he thought it was so bad I just took his word for it. I see lots of people using it in their cars with no problems and if I'm not mistaken VW recommends using Castrol but that always stuck with me and I never used it since.
 

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I guess I'm really not sure what to think now about Castrol ... Seems to be some pretty good opinions on it.

My father was a mechanic back in the days where we had service stations with a mechanic on duty. He always used Quaker state. .... That stuff will sludge up a engine fast.
As I got older I learned penzoil will do the exact same thing. I'm not sure but I think it is oil that uses paraffin that causes the sludge? .... Maybe today with most oils synthetic it just does not matter ... I dunno.
I chose Castrol because I believed it did not have paraffin.

Same time I'm kinda disappointed in it. I have a Chevy truck that I drive less then 6k miles a year, owned it for 5 years, I change the oil fall & spring.
I imagine it has about 1500 miles on it now & will change it in September .... It just looks dirty. Always looks dirty.
I guess thats just a characteristic of Castrol I should be use to.

7 or 8 years ago I was selling a work van with a good motor/bad transmission. Cheap. I drove it for over 10 years nothing but Castrol .... Was a factory crate engine when I bought it and ran very well. Passed all emission standards.
A potential customer wanted the 351 4bbl engine for his own project, He took one look at the oil and refused to stay around to hear it run. Thats Castrol for you.

I Dunno maybe I cant complain & just looking for a exscuse to change oil brands.
You really can't tell if Oil is good or bad, going by color! The only way to tell if the oil is still functional or not, is to have the oil "ANALYZED" by an Oil analysis laboratory. Personally. I have used the "First Synthetic" that passed the API performance specs back in 1972, and that oil is AMSOIL. I have used this product since 1980, and have never had any issues. They advertise "on the container, "Up to 25,000 miles/one year drain i intervals. The Company is now 50 years in business producing 100 % Synthetics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Really not fair for me to blame engine damage on Castrol. ...... I just have this feeling though that Castrol did not help the situation.

My Wife Father bought the 1993 Caravan with 150k miles on it and needed the trans rebuilt. A Lady bought it new, nice body & interior but the drive train did not get proper maintenance.
So any engine damage I found at 186K, most likely was caused by poor maintenance early on.
While Father drove it he always changed the Castrol oil on time, when we took it over our driving habits we drive the car 4k-5k miles a year .... So I change the oil in Fall & spring and is way under 3k miles on the oil.

What I found when I diagnosed the engine failure, A piston broke at the wrist pin. The rod destroyed the block ... total destruction.
I also found 2 other pistons when I removed them, the top ring was broke .... just fell off the piston when removed from the hole.
Just saying it was a time bomb waiting to explode.

My thinking is, possibly the piston broke because of improper lubrication at the wrist pin? ..... Just a WAG but not too far fetched.
How long will a engine run with a broken ring? This engine leaked 1/4 quart of oil in 3k miles, no smoke.
I would suspect after a few thousand miles with the rings "loose" flopping up and down, possibly breaking a ring landing eventually just destroy the whole cylinder.

So that's the question I'm asking myself. .... Did those rings break before the engine had 150k miles on it? ..... Or was it in the past 36k miles after it was switched to Castrol?
I just find it hard to believe the engine would run for over 40k miles with 2 pistons with broken rings. .... I could be wrong though.
 

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My father was a mechanic back in the days where we had service stations with a mechanic on duty. He always used Quaker state. .... That stuff will sludge up a engine fast.
As I got older I learned penzoil will do the exact same thing. I'm not sure but I think it is oil that uses paraffin that causes the sludge?
I may be mis remembering this as its been close to 30 years ago. But my dad was a mechanic and he saw it all. When him and my mom bought there 1993 Dodge Spirit, which was the first and only car they ever bought new, he used Penzoil in it for oil changes, and it either burned oil real bad or leaked, cant remember which, but when he switched to Castrol the problem went away entirely. They got over 200,000 miles outta that car, so the Castrol did its thing
 

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50 years ago I was using Castrol and Shell in cars. Still use Shell in diesels. I used to work for a company which supplies industrial lubricants, had access to both lab and field data for all brands of motor oil. I've been using Mobil 1 changed once a year for over thirty years now. And I figure that's why engines in my cars only last 3-400,000 miles (and I don't live in the snow belt, so the car can last that long as well. Still have a rust free 67 Dart.) Some where I've got a picture from when I replaced the valve cover gaskets on the 01 T&C 3.8 at 180,000 miles. Top of engine was spotless. No trace of sludge or varnish. So there may be other fine oils out there, but I've had no complaints with Mobil1.
 
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Castrol oil was originally made from Castor beans (vegetable fats). It was the among the best engine oils of the time before they were able to effectively refine petroleum oils. The big drawback was that it was one-time use & had to be drained out while still warm or else it would solidify.

A motor oil that is API-certified & meets Chrysler MS-6395 is an important consideration when selecting your motor oil.

Oil filters have their own standards too. Use Mopar or an approved filter when possible:
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Just keep in mind that with all of the consolidation in recent decades, it's down to a handful of manufacturers who make most filters. Like MANN+HUMMEL, who now makes filters for Wix and Purolator, and WIX is primary supplier for NapaGold and Platinum oil filters. Kind of like car batteries - ALL brands are made by 3 or 4 manufacturers for the most part. As Imperial said, I think as long as it meets the OE spec, it's rated for semi or full synthetic oils, and you change it regularly, you should be okay. On engines like the Hemi and the Pentastar, I always try to look for an OE Mopar. I save my receipts, as well as the tops of the boxes and note the date, mileage, and oil used at each change. That way, no excuses if it ever came down to a warranty claim.
 

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I generally use Mobil1 and MoPar filter - both available at the local Wally World. In the past I used mainly conventional oils - Valvoline, Quaker State, Pennzoil, Castrol - whatever was on sale. The last few oil changes I switched to Mobil1 or Quaker State synthetic. Lately, the synthetic is only a few dollars more compared to conventional.

Took our RAV4 in for an oil change at Firestone. I knew it would need synthetic. Ended up charging me $86 - more than I expected.
 

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Or just skip the passenger car oils and go to the cheaper but superior hdeo´s like rotella, delvac or delo. ( these are oil made for hevyduty engines like big rigs, excavators, tractors etc.)
- they have 3 drawbacks..
They come in few viscosity flavors, usually 15w-40 and sometimes 10w-40.
They come in a big can, no quarts or 5 quarts..more like 20 quarts.
- they may not be suited for moderns variable valvetrain due to their visc.
For a flathead with non roller cam and lousy crancase ventilation they would be great. Enough zinc for the cam, have good properties for soot and dilution control. ( diesels generally needs this.)
- the standard for these oils are higher then passcar ( pcmo ) oils esp when it comes to hightemp shear visc (diesel knock and rodberings esp, also great for cam protection ) and sludge control ( soot and sludge retention and dissolving. They also stand more fuel in the oil.
Look for api ch or ch-4...the later ones ( api ci..) are designed for particelfilters so they have gone down a bit in the antiwear add pack ( zinc mostly)
 

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KOG
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Or just skip the passenger car oils and go to the cheaper but superior hdeo´s like rotella, delvac or delo. ( these are oil made for hevyduty engines like big rigs, excavators, tractors etc.)
- they have 3 drawbacks..
They come in few viscosity flavors, usually 15w-40 and sometimes 10w-40.
They come in a big can, no quarts or 5 quarts..more like 20 quarts.
- they may not be suited for moderns variable valvetrain due to their visc.
For a flathead with non roller cam and lousy crancase ventilation they would be great. Enough zinc for the cam, have good properties for soot and dilution control. ( diesels generally needs this.)
- the standard for these oils are higher then passcar ( pcmo ) oils esp when it comes to hightemp shear visc (diesel knock and rodberings esp, also great for cam protection ) and sludge control ( soot and sludge retention and dissolving. They also stand more fuel in the oil.
Look for api ch or ch-4...the later ones ( api ci..) are designed for particelfilters so they have gone down a bit in the antiwear add pack ( zinc mostly)
I use Rotella T6 (synthetic) in lawn mower engines (hot running air cooled), but not in cars. Those still run Mobil 1 which has an additive package closer to what cars like. And Rotella T4 in Ram diesels because mine run very low annual mileage with no benefit to synthetics.
 

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Correct viscosity is important, not only for fuel economy (reduced viscous drag) but for the fast hydraulic reaction times needed for MDS, MultiAir & VVT/VCT valvetrain systems. On older engines you might be able to get away with a heavier viscosity.

I have run HDEO in engines with ring/bearing wear issues. It was a band-aid. The best suggestion would be to follow the manufacturers recommendations in the owners manual.
Chrysler uses Pennzoil brand for factory testing & certification. Use an API-certified motor oil that meets the Material Standard-6395 for gasolibe engines.
There are a lot of exaggerated marketing claims & boutique oils out there that is advertising 'fluff'.
Prices of synthetics have come down in recent years. 10K mile maintenance intervals are becoming normal.
There should be no need for crankcase additives.
Run the break-in oil for the full recommended term, despite the obsolete conventional practices of 'back in the day'.


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