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I have 2005 Dodge Dakota. Last June I did all four wheel brake job which is the front pads and rear shoes, Well, just now, I find the front right rotor warped (because a mechanic used a hammer to pound off the rotor to replace three studs). So now I want to replace the rotor. Maybe do the other side too. But, do I also need the change the pads again? I looked at them and still looks thick.

What you recommend?
 

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Its not necessary to change pads because of a rotor change but it´s conviniet to
do at the same time since everything is apart.
- You should always change discs as a pair for straight braking reasons.
 

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I have 2005 Dodge Dakota. Last June I did all four wheel brake job which is the front pads and rear shoes, Well, just now, I find the front right rotor warped (because a mechanic used a hammer to pound off the rotor to replace three studs). So now I want to replace the rotor. Maybe do the other side too. But, do I also need the change the pads again? I looked at them and still looks thick.

What you recommend?

Yes
 

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KOG
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No need to change pads. But you either need to have a slightly rough surface on the new rotors (they should come that way) or sand the pads lightly for breakin. Then treat them like new pads, gentle braking for a few stops to let them bed in.
 

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Spyro; Unless you can make your old pads flat and parallel to the backing plate, I'd recommend new pads. Note that calipers, at least in the rust belt, have a tendency to hang up within a year or two after a pad change.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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I'd compare the thickness of the current pads to new ones (if possible). At any rate, while new pads aren't absolutely necessary, I'd probably put new ones on since I would have everything apart. Light sanding to rough up the rotors is a good practice, but again not absolutely necessary of they have a rough surface from the factory.

The general recommendation is to replace brake parts in pairs so if replacing one rotor, the other rotor should be replaced as well.
 

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Spyro; Unless you can make your old pads flat and parallel to the backing plate, I'd recommend new pads. Note that calipers, at least in the rust belt, have a tendency to hang up within a year or two after a pad change.
You got it right.
 

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And your three front studs probably broke because a mechanic used an air impact wrench without a torque stick, to over torque the lug nuts........ (at least that is one of the biggest causes of snapping wheel studs) ....gotta love how shoddy workmanship causes more work......

You do, at the very least, have to inspect the pads for any damage from the bad rotor. Keep in mind, I've had pads "tilt", the surface worn at an angle, so the pad was tilted in guide rails, and it was a hard spot on the rotor that caused the pad to wear that way. So, make sure the pad is flat and square.

Roughing up the pad surface with some sandpaper, especially if it appears a bit glazed can't hurt, although some may argue it does nothing.

The old argument, if the rotor is damaged the pads may be damaged as well, and the bad pads could then damage the new rotor, its just wise to replace them both with a fresh set, has some merit. That is why I say inspect the pads closely, if you can something off about them, I wouldn't risk it and just get another set. But if the old pads look fine, chances are very high they will work fine as well.
 

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For $25 - $30 bucks save yourself the headaches. Just as well to get new anti rattle hardware while you're at it and forget about the front brakes for a couple years if you do it right.
 

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I don't know the price range for front pads for a 2005 Dodge Dakota, but I stay away from the lower priced, meaning lower quality pads. I don't feel the need to buy the absolute top of the line pads, or specialty after market pads. But I haven't purchased pads at the good quality level I believe is necessary, for less than $60 in years for all my cars. Just keep in mind, it is very much worth the extra $30 or so for good quality pads.
 

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If the pads are still that new and there aren't any grooves worn into them, save the money, you will be changing them eventually but should be able to get a bit of time out of them.
 

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Torque Stick
That's funny..Torque wrench.
Torque Sticks are an attachment to air impact wrenches, they look like a socket extension, that work like a torque wrench. Good tire shops use them, so they can put on wheels with air impact wrenches without over torquing them.
 

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KOG
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Good tire shops use real torque wrenches, by hand. Torque Sticks are a POS because the amount of torque they apply varies quite a bit depending on the brand of wrench and the shop air pressure. When I was selling MAC tools I wouldn't allow those things on my truck. But that doesn't keep hords of guys from using them, just as many others use air wrenches without even torque sticks to tighten lugs. But not on my car they don't.
 

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Torque Stick

Torque Sticks are an attachment to air impact wrenches, they look like a socket extension, that work like a torque wrench. Good tire shops use them, so they can put on wheels with air impact wrenches without over torquing them.
I agree with KOG,wouldn't use them.
 

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I do NOT disagree, personally I use a torque wrench as well. My point was, bad tire shops and mechanics will use an air impact wrench without even a torque stick, and way over torque the lug nuts. Thus people stuck with lug nuts they can't get off, and people that have wheel studs that crack and snap off while driving.

Torque from an Air Impact Wrench will vary with the construction and quality of the Air Impact Wrench and the Air Pressure used, etc... That is the idea behind the Torque Stick, just like a torque wrench, doesn't matter if you're twice as strong as another guy applying torque to the wrench, you still apply the correct amount of torque. Doesn't matter if the Air Impact Wrench is producing more than the correct torque, as long as it produces at least the same as the correct torque, the Torque Stick will decouple at the correct torque and stop transmitting torque to the lug nuts. i.e. won't let the air impact wrench over torque the lug nuts.

One thing that air impact wrenches are NOT good at doing, that humans with a torque wrench can do much better, is slow down and ensure the forces applied are much closer to "static" than "dynamic". And I think that is why a Torque Stick is NOT so accurate. Air Impact Wrenches, like you said will vary so much in performance, that means they vary in speed and always fast, no matter how good you make a torque stick the speed the air impact wrench will run at a speed that will include "dynamic" forces that will throw off the actual torque on the lug, cause its suppose to be static.

Turning a wrench at 2°-3° a second, dynamic forces would be negligible, but an air impact wrench turning 3600° a second, it could be significant. If you've never done it, as you tighten down a lug with a torque wrench, especially if you had to crank the lug down a couple of turns before the wrench clicked and started moving the wrench quickly, go back and apply the torque again much slower and you'll see the lug will turn another couple of degrees before the wrench clicks again. If you get the wrench to click when the wrench moved very slowly, you find that you can apply the torque again and again and NOT get the lug nut to move before the wrench clicks.

So despite a torque stick being inaccurate, and I can see people rejecting it over a torque wrench for that reason, at least the torque stick is ensuring the mechanic is NOT over torqueing the lug nut by 2-3 times the spec torque and causing immediate damage, which guys that use air impact wrenches alone are doing.

My impression is:
Torque Wrenches (provided they are decent quality, shape and calibration) do much better.
Torque Sticks NOT so good, but at least ensure the lugs are NOT drastically over torqued.
Air Impact Wrench alone, even if a talented mechanic tries to keep it from over-torqueing, will vary drastically and the torques will be way off, as well, the chances of way over-torqueing lugs to the point of damaging them is unacceptably high.

Perhaps another to put it.
Mechanics that use a Torque Wrench to fasten wheels = Good
Mechanics that use a Torque Stick to fasten wheels = NOT so Good
Mechanics that just use an Air Impact Wrench alone to fasten wheels = Run Away as Fast as You Can!
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Just don't paint all shops as using only the air impact guns and torque sticks. The Firestone shop I patronize uses torque wrenches.
 

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Yea, that might be the point here really, look for shops that use an actual torque wrench.

Shops that don't even use torque sticks is pure malpractice, an air impact wrench alone will damage your studs/lug nuts (which arguably may damage rotors/brakes and wheels as well, but less likely) if NOT at least leave you stranded from a flat tire, cause you simply can NOT loosen the lug nuts to remove the flat tire.
 

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KOG
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Factory tools are VERY expensive torque limiting devices which just happen to be run by air. An when I was a Cad/Olds mechanic in 1970 part of dealer prep (specified y GM) was to check lug torque because GM knew not to trust assembly line work.
 
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