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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having a discussion w/ a fellow mopar enthusiast regarding engine/transaxle combos in the Cloud Cars, specifically the base models. According to my interpretation of Allpars article the only trans available w/ the 2.0L SOHC was the nv-t350 both of which are found in the neon. Was the 2.0L also available w/ an auto trans? And if so which one?
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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It *looks* like the 2.0L in the Plymouth Breeze was available with either the 41TE (A604) automatic overdrive in addition to the manual. Given that the Plymouth was the basic-transportation version of the car they'd want models capable of being driven by anyone, not just people who drive vehicles with manual transportations.

Rock Auto only lists th one automatic transmission, the aforementioned 41TE for replacement parts for a '97 Breeze, and they seem to only list one manual transmission's parts. I don't know what manual it was though.
 

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The Breeze was definitely offered as a 2.0 SOHC automatic. It was quite a dog and they gave into pressure and offered the 2.4 in the Breeze after a year or two.
Also, if you look on the EPA website for the 1996 Dodge Stratus, the following combos are listed (which given certification costs involved were very likely sold):
2.0 5 speed manual
2.0 4 speed automatic
2.4 4 speed automatic
2.5 4 speed automatic

At that time, the 2.0 with 4 speed auto was unique to the cloud cars as Neon would continue with the 3 speed auto for a few more years.
Rumours existed that the 2.4 was offered with a 5 speed, at least for export but that seems never to have happened.
When the Breeze was introduced, the demand for the 2.0 SOHC engine exceeded capacity and many Neons got a free upgrade to the 2.0 DOHC motor.
 

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One of the rarest combos was the top-line Stratus ES - loaded with all the options and leather - equipped with the 2.0L/automatic.

Never found any confirmation of a 2.4L/5-speed combo in the JA - even the Mexi-spec Stratus R/T with the turbo 2.4 was paired with the automatic.
 

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The 2.0L/41TE with the A/C on was almost dangerously slow when merging into traffic, but was fine for those looking for a high-value car like the very first Breezes.
The JA/JR was a bit heavier than the PL (Neon) and the JX convertible was heavier still.
The 2.4L didn't really feel that much stronger than the 2.0L. The 2.5L V6 was a nice, high-winding engine. The later 2.7L felt stronger still.
I never saw a column shift, front bench seat in one.
The 41TE was probably changed to a 40TE in the JR when they became available around mid-2002.
The 2.0L/5-speed (NV-T350) had some snap to it as far as moderate acceleration demands were concerned and I found them to be quite livable as a roomy economy car. Most of this base powertrain combination were probably for Mexico or export.
I feel the real advantage of a turbo/automatic is that the turbo spools up and stays spooled up, but the stick-shift does add snap.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Very thrilled have this information - thank you folks!

I do have a follow up question though:

What is the range of curb weights for the Cloud Car line up?
 

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C&D's initial road test had the 0-60 time on the 2.0/5-speed only 1 second less than the 2.5L/auto.

IC is correct - once the 40TE was available, it was the standard auto for the 2.4L engines in the JR.
 

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ImperialCrown said:
The 2.0L/41TE with the A/C on was almost dangerously slow when merging into traffic, but was fine for those looking for a high-value car like the very first Breezes.
The JA/JR was a bit heavier than the PL (Neon) and the JX convertible was heavier still.
The 2.4L didn't really feel that much stronger than the 2.0L. The 2.5L V6 was a nice, high-winding engine. The later 2.7L felt stronger still.
I never saw a column shift, front bench seat in one.
The 41TE was probably changed to a 40TE in the JR when they became available around mid-2002.
The 2.0L/5-speed (NV-T350) had some snap to it as far as moderate acceleration demands were concerned and I found them to be quite livable as a roomy economy car. Most of this base powertrain combination were probably for Mexico or export.
I feel the real advantage of a turbo/automatic is that the turbo spools up and stays spooled up, but the stick-shift does add snap.
I consulted my FSM, and I found THIS Paragraph in Group 14, Page 37, and Note the Sentence in Bold:

When the PCM senses low idle speeds or wide open
throttle through the throttle position sensor, it
removes the ground for the A/C compressor clutch
relay. When the relay de-energizes, the contacts open
preventing air conditioning clutch engagement. Also,
if the PCM senses a part throttle launch condition, it disables the A/C compressor clutch for several seconds.
 

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I have a '02 Sebring with 2.0 DOHC and AutoStick as a daily driver.
Obviously, it's not a rocket but you can make it go ok with high rpm. Here in Finland (in whole Europe?) we had only 2.0 DOHC or 2.7 V6 available, both with AutoStick. Manual trans was not an option. I quess 2.4 was offered sometime later after 2003 or so...
A bit better fuel mileage and easier / cheaper to maintain than the V6. And my wife really doesn't care what's there under hood.
 
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