Allpar Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
From what I've read on forums,quite a few owners and techs have mentioned a number is factors that affect Gen 3 Vans.


- Crank / Cam Position Sensors
- Map Sensor
- Thottle Position Sensor
- Intermittent solder connection at Instrument Cluster contributing to stall
- *Vehicle Theft security system issues
- Coil Packs -
-PCM wiring harness movement
- poor wiring connection at sensors
Fuel pump

If you can mention other common trends you've frequently foound on these GEN 3's, please add to this.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
36,950 Posts
1999 Chrysler Town and Country - 160k miles. not a single one of those issues has surfaced since the time I bought the van at 70k miles and even though I gave it to a relative it is still going strong. The only electrical issues I ever experienced was the failure of the rear pop out window motors and the starter failure around 140k.
 

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,685 Posts
Same here. Had a '00 T&C Ltd AWD (loaded) and none of the components on your list had problems. Bought ours with 78K on it and traded it in 5 years later with 161K on the odometer. The only electrical thing that went wacky 6 months before we traded it was the video system (dealer installed) that would turn on by itself at random times. Never did figure it out.

It had other issues that were not electrical in nature:

1) replaced cracked flexplate
2) replaced worn Nivomat shocks ($$$)

Everything else was normal maintenance (tune up, brakes, tires, battery, belts) - heck even the exhaust was still the original.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,369 Posts
Any of those issues may occur once, maybe twice on an outside chance in the lifetime of any vehicle.
If any of them are a repeated occurrence, then the root cause of the problem has not been properly diagnosed or addressed.
Multiple fuel pump replacements may mean that there is contamination inside the fuel tank that is killing pumps. I have found 'slime' on the inside walls of the tank that required a fuel tank replacement (along with a 3rd fuel pump).
Multiple cam/crank sensor replacements may mean that a flex plate has cracked. The fault code will keep coming back after replacing the sensor.
If something has to be repaired a second time, it is important to step back and look at the big picture. Something is being missed and it is usually something very simple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
I am one of those who had to re-solder the cluster plug, of course helped by the knowledge of those who did it before. I believe is fair to call this problem common. Makes me wonder, too, how many vans were junked by those owners who were never able to diagnose this condition (or balked at replacing the $500 cluster board + labor, if they were lucky enough to find a shop capable of pin-pointing the cause).
Flexplates are another story, but with the same consequences. That was one repair I paid my trusted shop to perform, and it took a week to persuade them about what it was. At least they didn't charge me for many extra hours of diagnostics. My 1999 van just hit 150K yesterday, but I surely would have disposed of it at about 90K if I were a checkbook mechanic the entire time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
1998 T&C 194K miles, original owner, no electrical problems ever. Fuel pump went a few weeks ago but it wasn't electrical, just an old pump. This van has been amazingly reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,098 Posts
1996 Grand Voyager. I had a bad PCM, a bad crank position sensor, bad fuel pump, and a bad speed sensor (3 speed tranny). Replacement of those items fixed the problems and they never returned. I also had a few relays go bad and replacement of new or salvage parts took care of those issues.

On a more serious note, I lost the 3 speed tranny in it, but they do seem to go out around 150,000 to 200,000 miles when the driving is heavy city traffic.

Steve, there are a gazillion of Gen III vans still on the road. When you hear of the problems mentioned, they are only occurring on a small percentage. I'd say if the van is in good shape, go for the purchase of it. The salvage value may be close to $500, so I don't think you can go wrong. Be sure to take a look at the strut tower integrity. Rust was also an issue in that area.

Personally, I think these vans, when they are old, are affordable for those who can make DIY repairs, but if you have to pay someone to fix anything, the labor can eat you alive because of how much has to be removed to make needed repairs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
1996 Plymouth Grand Voyager SE. Replaced the trasmission at 49K about 9 years ago, the tranny solenoid pack from the new remanufactured transmission a year later, and replaced the starter 12 years ago.

Also, it needs a new condenser. The compressor, AC clutch, coil and pulley was already replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
1996 Grand Voyager. I had a bad PCM, a bad crank position sensor, bad fuel pump, and a bad speed sensor (3 speed tranny). Replacement of those items fixed the problems and they never returned. I also had a few relays go bad and replacement of new or salvage parts took care of those issues.

On a more serious note, I lost the 3 speed tranny in it, but they do seem to go out around 150,000 to 200,000 miles when the driving is heavy city traffic.

Steve, there are a gazillion of Gen III vans still on the road. When you hear of the problems mentioned, they are only occurring on a small percentage. I'd say if the van is in good shape, go for the purchase of it. The salvage value may be close to $500, so I don't think you can go wrong. Be sure to take a look at the strut tower integrity. Rust was also an issue in that area.

Personally, I think these vans, when they are old, are affordable for those who can make DIY repairs, but if you have to pay someone to fix anything, the labor can eat you alive because of how much has to be removed to make needed repairs.
Totally agree, if there's anytime to start being a DIY mechanic it's with this van. It's not to say they break down all the time but you will discover in order to even get part A out you have to disassemble parts B through R. I have a 2000 DGC with the 3.3 and 4 speed with 172,000 miles. The transmission is still going strong only problems I've ever had were rubber components breaking down due to the harsh Arizona Summers. about a year ago I replaced everything in the brake system short of the lines, master cylinder, and brake booster in order to finally kill poor brake performance and uneven wear. As for electrical problems I've only had a ECM burn up.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top