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Do you always replace the OEM constant tension hose clamps with the same or use worm-screw type clamps? I remember reading that the ct type were better as they "give" a little as they heat up or cool down, but still maintain the tension. Just wondering. Thanks.
Larry
97 T&C 208,000 miles
 

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Either ones work, but the newer (last 15 years or so) CT clamps seem to last a lot better than the older ones. I always used the screw clamps until recently just because the CT clamps are of higher quality. I don't think there is much difference as far as ability goes, so now it is what is available instead of changing them all out because of looks.
 

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I had the top CT clamp on the Cummins begin to allow leakage after seven years. Replaced it with a screw clamp.Spring tension diminshes with time and temperature fluxuations.
 

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Anything can fail, I just think the CT clamps are better than they used to be, and sometimes the screw type clamps cut hoses or eat them up when tightening, not with the CT clamps.
 

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the scew type clamps are indeed affected by temperature and can leak when it gets cold. The constant tension clamps compensate for temerature variations. I almost had the upper radiator hose come off on the GC because the screw clamp did not compensate for the cold temperature. I now double clamped it with no problems.
 

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I tend to re-use the spring type clamps when connecting a heater hose to an appropriate orifice. However I make sure the mating surface on the orifice or port is clean. I used sandpaper to clean the mating surface. Then I apply a thin film of RTV sealant to the orifice or port, install the spring clamp and hose on the port and move the clamp to the appropriate area to hold. Usually with RTV sealant applied I have never had leaks with spring type hose clamps. If I do not use RTV sealant sometimes the spring hose clamps would allow a slight seepage.

In areas where access is difficult or non-existent I will not use a worm drive hose clamp. You will not be able to tighten after a period of months or years if a small seep appears.

On my 1991 Dakota with 5.2L V8 there were worm drive hose clamps on each end of the upper and lower radiator hose. But the heater hose and bypass hose used spring clamps. This was standard issue from the factory assembly line. Spring clamps were required on the bypass hose because once the braketing that holds the AC compressor and alternator is installed, there is no access to the hose clamps on the bypass hose between the water pump and thermostat housing.
 

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I have been converting over/back to the regular worm clamps. No issues with leakage or hoses being cut.
 

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AllanC said:
I tend to re-use the spring type clamps when connecting a heater hose to an appropriate orifice. However I make sure the mating surface on the orifice or port is clean. I used sandpaper to clean the mating surface. Then I apply a thin film of RTV sealant to the orifice or port, install the spring clamp and hose on the port and move the clamp to the appropriate area to hold. Usually with RTV sealant applied I have never had leaks with spring type hose clamps. If I do not use RTV sealant sometimes the spring hose clamps would allow a slight seepage.

In areas where access is difficult or non-existent I will not use a worm drive hose clamp. You will not be able to tighten after a period of months or years if a small seep appears.

On my 1991 Dakota with 5.2L V8 there were worm drive hose clamps on each end of the upper and lower radiator hose. But the heater hose and bypass hose used spring clamps. This was standard issue from the factory assembly line. Spring clamps were required on the bypass hose because once the braketing that holds the AC compressor and alternator is installed, there is no access to the hose clamps on the bypass hose between the water pump and thermostat housing.
I am agreeed with you here Allan. I am finding the material that the original CT clamps are made from is far superior to anything available. They can be a it of a p.i.t.a. to remove, clean both contacting surfaces and apply a bit of silicone lube , the reinstall works better if I put the clamp on the hose first, them slide the hose and clamped assy over the fitting in 1 move. Clean both contacting surfaces and apply a bit of silicone lube...fini
 
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