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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #1
My brother found one of these while using his metal detector. He’s not sure exactly what it is, or how old it is, as he’s not been able to find any info (other than this pic) online. If anyone knows more, I can pass the info along to him. Thanks in advance.

BA0A3989-0D0A-4CCB-8258-39F9F29E350F.jpeg
 

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My guess - these are older than the "Job Rated" campaign of the 40s and 50s..
If I Google "Dodge trucks for good luck" I see a few examples of these. But no dates.
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #4
It lists hydraulic brakes as a feature, which implies them being "new"? He was saying that hydraulic brakes were offered in the late 20's, so maybe it's from then or the 30's? It's weird that there isn't much info on them, or just haven't looked in the right spot yet.
 

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It lists hydraulic brakes as a feature, which implies them being "new"? He was saying that hydraulic brakes were offered in the late 20's, so maybe it's from then or the 30's? It's weird that there isn't much info on them, or just haven't looked in the right spot yet.
And Mopar is not on there yet... So I think you are right.. 30's
 

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Not only the features, but the fact it says "Dodge" rather than "Dodge Brothers" limits how old it can be.
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #7
According to the all-knowing and all-powerful Wikipedia, Dodge Brothers became Dodge in 1930, so any time after that....
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #9
I’ll have to ask him where he actually found it. They have an old farmhouse that was built in the 1840’s IIRC, and it has 23 or so acres of land with two big barns. You never know what you’re going to find out there. I’m not sure if he found it there or somewhere else.
 

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It lists hydraulic brakes as a feature, which implies them being "new"? He was saying that hydraulic brakes were offered in the late 20's, so maybe it's from then or the 30's? It's weird that there isn't much info on them, or just haven't looked in the right spot yet.
And it also lists "Oil Filter" as a feature ;)
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #11

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And it also lists "Oil Filter" as a feature ;)
Chrysler was ahead of the industry on oil filters. But even then they were quite an innovation in the last 20's and 30's.
 

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When the new 300C (2005) was introduced, they had a really big open house with live music and food just like they did for big movies. I attended the Tacoma dealer's party and was able to take a test ride that night. For that, I not only was entertained but received a commemorative silver coin. What would that be worth now?
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #16
When the new 300C (2005) was introduced, they had a really big open house with live music and food just like they did for big movies. I attended the Tacoma dealer's party and was able to take a test ride that night. For that, I not only was entertained but received a commemorative silver coin. What would that be worth now?
Assuming it’s real silver, the coin would be worth whatever the silver content is. But, for collectors of automotive memorabilia, it could be worth more. Though with the current state of the economy secondary to the pandemic, collectors are probably more inclined to hold onto their money. For myself, it would be a cool piece of memorabilia that I’d want to hold onto...at least until my wife made me get rid of it. Party pooper, she is. :D
 

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Assuming it’s real silver, the coin would be worth whatever the silver content is. But, for collectors of automotive memorabilia, it could be worth more. Though with the current state of the economy secondary to the pandemic, collectors are probably more inclined to hold onto their money. For myself, it would be a cool piece of memorabilia that I’d want to hold onto...at least until my wife made me get rid of it. Party pooper, she is. :D
I had one piece of memorabilia that I found missing after one of my moves. I had a Carter catalog covering all carbs from the 1930's thru the 60's. It was about 6 inches thick. Each insert covered repair parts and all adjustments for each carb. Most were 3 pages thick. It was a really important piece of history. Repair kits only give some of the adjustments and it had all orfice sizes. Had a complete list of metering rods with applications and step dimensions. You could change just about any fuel ratios throughout the spectrum. It was a big help adjusting my AVS.
 

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Jeepaholic
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Discussion Starter #18
I had one piece of memorabilia that I found missing after one of my moves. I had a Carter catalog covering all carbs from the 1930's thru the 60's. It was about 6 inches thick. Each insert covered repair parts and all adjustments for each carb. Most were 3 pages thick. It was a really important piece of history. Repair kits only give some of the adjustments and it had all orfice sizes. Had a complete list of metering rods with applications and step dimensions. You could change just about any fuel ratios throughout the spectrum. It was a big help adjusting my AVS.
That sucks. I can’t stand to lose anything, especially something really special. It drives me nuts, and I’ll keep looking until I find it, or I drive everyone else (especially my wife) crazy with my ranting. Hey, at least I acknowledge I have a problem. That’s the first step to getting well, right? :D
 

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That sucks. I can’t stand to lose anything, especially something really special. It drives me nuts, and I’ll keep looking until I find it, or I drive everyone else (especially my wife) crazy with my ranting. Hey, at least I acknowledge I have a problem. That’s the first step to getting well, right? :D
You never get over a loss like that. It was irreplaceable. Carter is no more and since I spent months on understanding and adjusting carbs, I know what the adjustments that are not listed in the kits can do for smoothing out minor issues, power and fuel mileage. When set right, my AVS on my 68 R/T was 17 on the highway. Most were 10-14.
 

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You never get over a loss like that. It was irreplaceable. Carter is no more and since I spent months on understanding and adjusting carbs, I know what the adjustments that are not listed in the kits can do for smoothing out minor issues, power and fuel mileage. When set right, my AVS on my 68 R/T was 17 on the highway. Most were 10-14.
Back in the 1960's till 1990's I ran one of the Performance/Race dynos at the Chrysler Tech Center. We had a Carburetor lab where carbs were flow tested and adjusted and modified. Holley had a permanent engineer named Gary Congdon and Carter had a permanent engineer named Marty Fuch who spent all their time at the Tech Center working on Chrysler carbs. Those guys could work magic.
 
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