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Discussion Starter #1
So I just did my first head gasket swap on a 94 dodge spirit 3l v6 today and I marked everything, with the exception of course, of one ground wire. It's 6 inches long and doesn't bolt to anything, but rather has clips on both sides to clip onto something thin. I'm at a loss, and I'm guessing the cars unwillingness to turn over and check engine voltage codes are related to this one ground wire. Any suggestions on it's location?
 

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Welcome to Allpar. A true battery/chassis/engine ground wire would have eyelet terminals at either end for a secure electrical connection. The woven ground straps with spring clips at each end were used for radio/static suppression more than any real DC current handling.
You may find the 'witness' scratch marks left from the clip ends at the right motor mount bracket across the rubber isolator (engine-to-frame rail).
Your no-crank and fault codes probably aren't related to its absence You may have to review the engine compartment wiring elsewhere.
Which codes?
 

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Was the car parked long enough for the battery to discharge, i.e., is the battery just near dead? The negative lead from the battery should be bolted to the block usually at the bell housing.
 

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This ground goes on the motor mount on the timing belt side of the engine. Clips onto the motor mount and "jumps" across the rubber isolater providing conductivity to ground.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Quick update. First of all THANKS TREMENDOUSLY for the post concerning the location. You say it jumps from the motor mount, which makes sense because I do now notice a "clean" spot where it's been. Do I just clip it anywhere onto the motor? Also, it would crank but not start. My apologies for any confusion. I had my father in law take a look at it since it's my first ever rebuild, and he said it's getting really close to starting. I'll probably receive some grief for this, but I paid so much attention to the timing belt, and marking it, that I seem to have compkletely ignored the position of the distributor when I took it out. He said it's likely that it's so far off that it's missing the spark too much to start. I brought this up to him after I sprayed in some starter fluid and the engine neglected to start. We're in the process of taking the covers off right now so we can see the position of the number 1 cylinder and making sure it lines up with distributor position one. Second question, distributor position one is the labeled position on the distributor cap correct? I see 6 numbers on the cap, I just assumed the number one was not only spark plug one, but cylinder one.

Recap -

Does that ground go from the motor mount to any specific location or just the engine?
Could an off distributor cap cause the engine to turn over, and come close to starting but not start?
And finally, is position number 1 on the dist cap the position it should be in when I set cylinder 1 to TDC?

Thanks again :). I'll update once I hopefully fix this problem.
 

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If you didn't mark the distributor position before disassembly, and didn't set it just right now, that's your problem.

From 1992 on, the 3.9L V-6 and 5.2L V-8 used a crankshaft position sensor for the ignition timing, which is non-adjustable. Rotating the distributor has no effect on ignition timing, but instead the Hall effect sensor is used for fuel injector synchronization. So if the distributor is rotated slightly off, the fuel injectors won't fire at the proper moment.

The distributor shaft can only go in one of two ways, so if it's in correctly, you just have to rotate the distributor body to the exact position. To do that, move the engine to TDC of cylinder one, take the cap off, loosen the hold-down bolt, and rotate the body until the center of the rotor tip lines up exactly with a notch that's cut into the lip of the distributor body. If you are off by +3 degrees, it will still run great, but more, or less than zero, and it will not start.

The ground wire is not involved in the no-start at all. It's for reducing radio interference and for keeping the potential of the chassis the same as the engine.
 
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The strap doesn't go to the engine per se, but from engine mount bracket side-to-frame bracket side across the rubber isolator.

Be careful about the firing order on the 3.0L cap as the underside terminals don't line up with top side wire terminals (there are jumpers/bridges molded into the cap to conduct the spark to the proper plug wire terminal-see link).

0900c15280215cc6.gif

This can throw you off track when determining the correct firing order. It is not intuitive if you don't know about the internal cap contact bridges. The #1 rotor position isn't directly under the #1 plug wire terminal position, where you think it should be.

Some 3.0L distributors can't turn. There is no adjustment slot, just a stud hole. The distributor position is fixed. As mentioned, the timing on these is determined by the crank position sensor.
 

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I believe you are talking about a 3.0 here. The #1 plug wire hole is not where your distributor rotor points to when setting up this engine for TDC. You need to look inside your distributor cap and observe that the #1 contact is offset from the plug wire hole. If the plug wire hole is at the 12 O'Clock position, the #1 contact inside the distributor is about at the 3 O'clock position. Making that correction will most likely resolve your problem.
 

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John Wood said:
I believe you are talking about a 3.0 here.
Sorry, disregard my last post. Reading too many threads at once.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update:

1) Found the location of the ground wire, and attached it. No longer getting check engine voltage codes.
2) Pulled off the camshaft? cover, so that I could get a view of piston position via rocker arms while I used a wire to check the piston for TDC. I thought I had positioned it correctly but it wouldn't even come close to starting this time. I waited for some assistance and when the guy who had a clue got there he checked it and found out that I was in the exhaust stroke not the compression stroke. Once we got that worked out it started! THANKS A TON

Now.. unfortunately I will find a ride to work again tomorrow because there was a small leak from the fuel injectors where I put the new o-ring. Just when I think I finally finished working on my car >.>, but hey it's not ruined right? I can't complain, and I learned a hell of a lot.

Thanks again ppl. Specifically, John Wood, Imperial Crown, Cudapete, and althought it was aimed towards a different size engine, Bob Lincoln provided overall useful information.
 

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Glad that it's running. The injector o-ring seals fit tightly into the rail sockets and a light smear of engine oil will help them slide in to place if not seated.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Quick question concerning the rubber line to fuel injectors (seperate from the fuel injector o-ring that I need to replace). I noticed that it was very weathered and i was hoping to be able to replace it. I followed the line down from the fuel injectors where the rubber hose just clamps on, to where it meets the metal line, and it looks like it's just a simple push pull clip, but there are crimp ferrules. Basically i'm just wondering how to go about replacing this small, maybe 10 inch section. Can I buy any line with a quick connect fitting in that size?
 

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To replace it you have two options. You can buy the quick-connect fitting at an auto parts store, and clamp new hose to it. Or you can just use new hose and fuel injection clamps on both ends. You might have to double up on the clamps to get a tight seal, however.

Use only SAE rating 30R9 or 100R6 - do not use 30R6 or 30R7. They don't have a high enough pressure or burst rating. Make sure that it's fuel injection hose and use only fuel injection (band) clamps.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Solid. Thanks again, and that is all. I'm sure I'll be back, just started working on cars after having 0 interest in them for the first 23 years, and enjoying it.
 
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