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yall are picky, I could care less about a very little cosmetic Alignment issue like that. ill be worried if it was a alignment issue that effected something that was actually Structural, like Slaming the Lifegate and its so misaligned that it breaks the tail lamps or Shutting a door and having it bang against the body structure causing paint/body imperfections.
These jeeps literally cost about $10,000 less than I paid for my house, 5 years ago. It better fit well.
 

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Not everyone can say that though. especially in the DC area where your typical 2200sqft home cost 400K
We'll have to disagree that because property is cheap in one area that a very expensive jeep can have poor fit and finish. I find it unacceptable especially for the high price tag these vehicles demand but still come with very very dated (albeit good) drivetrains. Our Hondas that cost $20k Canadian fit near percect, much better than those $100,000+ Jeeps.
 

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I have never worked in any type of assembly plant (auto or otherwise)

I still believe auto workers that are aware of parts that are out-of-spec or poorly made, which makes proper assemble not feasible, should notify their supervisor or quality control employee (whether management or not). Unionized auto workers have union representatives that they can notify of poor quality issues - unless they don’t care about their work and quality of the finished product.
It's obvious. What you're failing to understand in these types of companies is that if any one person above you in the chain of command disagrees with your issues and you're stopping the line, you're losing your job.
 

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There were studies done from the 1960s onwards saying that the people who build cars tend to care more about quality than the plant managers.

Volvo, when they let workers dictate more back in the 1970s, found that productivity stayed the same but quality shot up. Volvo went from a car with a dismal rep to one which was seen as very reliable and solid thanks to Pehr Gyllenhammar.

The next CEO after him decided Mitsubishi was the ideal to be worshipped, and now Volvo belongs to Geely.

Personally, having worked in many companies and having consulted in many more, I have found that the organizational culture is extremely powerful in changing the priorities of each person in the company.
I'm in manufacturing of forestry equipment. I can assure you our most profitable changes in production recently have come via listening to what the guys who actually build the product say will increase productivity and decrease defects. Nobody knows how to build things better, better than the people who actually build them. Big egos, and respect by title are the biggest detrements to productivity.
 

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This is a new vehicle. Still expecting things to be perfect the first time around when you still say the company is terrible is laughable at best.
If it was bad last year, you think less than a year later it's magically got better because of a merger? Things take time.
If things take time to get right you take the time to get it right before you start the line. Saying its new we can't expect it to be good is a deplorable copout.
 

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Except there's millions of Americans that still won't buy new vehicles from any automaker in the first year because they know there's kinks in them, including the fit & finish. And that's for every automaker sans the status symbols like Ferrari & Lamborghini. There are people who want the car #1 to be perfect, and there's people that want car #37,845 to be better than car #1.
What's your point? People are unrealistic for wanting an expensive product to be built right? We're already ignoring 10 year old drive trains for $100,000 I really don't think it's unreasonable to expect the body panels and trim pieces to fit right. Really couldn't care less what Ferrari and Lambo can fleece pull over their customers. Not sure what relevance that has with a Jeep. I'm also one of the people who won't buy first or second model years, I know they're rushing out the cars and letting early customers be the true RnD testers. I wait for forums to blow up with complaints, if they don't, I also usually will ask people that own the vehicles what their 1,2 and 3 year experince is. With how overpriced and under built new cars are, it's my belief you're crazy to buy early model years.

Everything we build where I work is checked over so many times its almost wasteful. We refuse to send out a defective product and last time they told us any numbers the company did almost $800M in sales and paid an 8% profit share to all employees. So you can still make money making things right.
 

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So, do you have first hand knowledge of this? Or is this a friend of a friend of a friend kind of knowledge?
There were more than a handful of red nosed red necked full timers when I was a TPT at Windsor.

I also understand it, I don't think I could have done line work for more than a few months without needing to sedate my brain...
 

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That makes sense. I wouldn't want to drop $80k+ on a vehicle and get a crappy Compass as a loaner.
I wouldn't want to drop $80,000 and need a loaner in the first 60,000 miles.

Are they disclosing that these vehicles are defective when new and informing customers they should expect to be waiting on their $80,000 Jeep needing repairs they can't perform right away? 🤣🤣🤣
 

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That really limits your choice of cars to... none.
You're trying to tell me every single passenger car made today at that price level is guaranteed to suffer a breakdown severe enough to require a loaner vehicle within it's first 100,000km?

Because none of my vehicles at any price ever suffered a breakdown so bad the vehicle could no longer be driven, even my LX.
 

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Guaranteed? No. However, there is a good chance that any newly purchased vehicle will require a loaner, be it for warranty repair, or service work. For the JD Power 2022 Vehicle Dependability Study, measuring 3 years of ownership on 2019 models here is the average reported "problems" per 100 vehicles

"Owners of mass market vehicles experience fewer problems: Mass market brands average 190 problems per 100 vehicles (PP100)."

Link here: 2022 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study

That means (again on average) you can expect your brand new vehicle to potentially have ~2 defects that need repaired. Supply chain remains a huge hold up too. Let's say it's the nav unit that is bad. Dealer tells you "come back in 3 weeks when the part is here and we will get it installed same day". Halfway through the fix they also notice some other associated part is bad, and maybe they can fast track the part in next business day. Well if it's Friday, your car is torn apart and undriveable, so now you need a loaner.

This is just the reality we live in, particularly now with supply chain shortages.

It's not just catastrophic failures that require a loaner, it's also some fixes take a lot of time and care to properly disassemble, repair, and reassemble. Especially the more advanced vehicles become.
This a big part of why I decided not to buy something I liked for my daily. I fully expect a newer Charger to have even more failures than my fairly simple 2010 LX had. I fully expect the car to cost more and be less reliable. So I didn't buy another and went with something cheap and boring.

Needing a loaner does not mean the vehicle was inoperable. Maybe the repair can’t be completed the first day so you’re given an overnight loaner to prevent having to make another trip back.
Maybe a repair is started and they find out there’s another part needed that can’t be gotten until tomorrow.
I’ve had both those happen to me and went home in a loaner. Much more efficient than having to get the car back, go home, and return the next day.
We shouldn't be accepting or expecting such widespread failures on new vehicles. Could be just me but I find it unacceptable. None of my 80s and 90s cars from any brand ever suffered anything worth noting until well after 100,000km. I refuse to accept poor build quality as normal. If high cost and unreliability is to be expected with all the technology, maybe it's time we step back from it.

The more expensive a car, the more likely it is they will give you a loaner even for minor repairs if they have to send out for parts.
This might be accurate but I personally don't accept it as ok. I was ready to buy another Charger or Ram 2500 6.4 manual, but there's no way I will now after continuing to read so many posts over the years of the exact same problems. Not to mention my LX was keeping me under it as much as driving it.

Has there ever been a period in automotive history where a higher purchase price automatically equate to proportionally fewer mechanical failures? Historically, the white glove customer service sold some pretty unreliable, but opulent cars.
Some guys at work have Lexus and Genesis cars that were very expensive. A couple are over 150,000km with absolutely no failures aside from wear parts.
 
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