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You might first check the VIN with a decoder to determine what's original:

1968-69 Dodge Vehicle Identification Numbers (vin) (at http://www.tpocr.com/dodgevin4.html )

It's probably better to know the owner's asking price and bargain down from there. Here's what Nada says:

1968 Dodge Dart GT 2 Door Hardtop Prices, Values & Dart GT 2 Door Hardtop Price Specs (at https://www.nadaguides.com/Cars/1968/dodge/dart-gt/2-door-hardtop/values )

If it doesn't have the original engine, needs total restoration and doesn't run, offer lower than the low value. But if it's a GT, you probably won't get it for 3 figures, unless the owner doesn't know what he's got and just wants to unload it.

Rust definitely works against it. I recently saw a '66 Dart GT convertible with rust-through, and without most of its interior, asking $1200 in a consignment yard.
 

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Good research. So you know that the engine and trans aren't original; this detracts from the value. A 273 2-bbl could have had a column shifter; with a 4-bbl, I'd expect a 4-speed. Does the steering column have a connection for a shift lever? Or did you see a hole in the carpet where the floor shifter should be? I like the color scheme. I thought the optional bucket seats were standard in the GT models. Found this for tire size -- looks like there were several:

http://www.automobile-catalog.com/tire/1968/628880/dodge_dart_gt_2-door_hardtop_170_six.html

Is your purpose to make it a show car, restore it to original, or just fix it enough to make it a driver?

When discussing the car with the owner, don't insult it. Say something like you like the body style, it has potential, but it needs work, and since you're a Mopar man, you're willing and able to do the work.
 

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Looks like the color was changed, and a hood scoop was added. Perhaps it was used for racing at some point. The car may have changed hands several times, and its documented history might lack many important details, including the patched hole in the floor; if that was for an auto shifter, and the fender tag said 3-on-the-tree, the trans may have been replaced more than once. Could the original have been a 3-speed floor shifter? And if it now has a 383, it should be mated to a larger TorqueFlite 727, which would also mean the original driveshaft was either replaced or cut. Motor mounts might be different. What adjustments were made to the suspension for the 383? There was also a Dart GTS during those years that had a stronger suspension if the heavier 383 was original (the base GTS engine was a 340).

The body looks good from the angle you pictured, but for an original restoration, it probably needs a lot. Such a project could take a while, which might not be a bad thing, if your son does most of the work.

As for price, I found this:

1968 68 Dodge Dart GT Project Car for sale: photos, technical specifications, description (at http://topclassiccarsforsale.com/dodge/217372-1968-68-dodge-dart-gt-project-car.html )

I think it's asking too much. The GT wasn't that rare, and it came standard with the base Slant 6. A GTS is worth more.
 

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I'd personally avoid it at that price, which makes me wonder if the owner really wants to sell it. Restoring it will take a lot of money, and you don't want to spend too much up front. The 340 probably has more value than a 383, and certainly more than a 318, but it's still not original.
 
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