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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever used that Gumout High Mileage skinny bottle of yellow liguid? And if so does it help do anything? And, I bought these expensive no gap Bosch Platinum2 spark plugs. All 6 of em for my 98 Sebring 2.5 ltr 6cyl multi port fuel injection motor. Does anyone think that's important and if so, should I have bought new plug wires too? Or anything else for that matter to help engine? Its at 107K now and I noticed the plugs had lil oil around the threads other day when IT took the front 3 out and looked at em. Also found out one of the head gaskets has been changed sometime not to long ago before I bought it with 99K on it. And the bottom of motor has oil on it. It don't burn oil between changes either. So...
 

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I have found Techron to be the only injector cleaner recommended by major auto manufacturers by name.
The recommended plug for the Sebring 2.5L is the Champion RC10PYP4 as stated on your underhood label.
OEM parts are recommended for best results. I have had issues with some Bosch components.
At 100K, the wires probably should have been changed while the manifold was off. If original, the Mitsubishi wires should have the build date printed on them.
At 100K, the timing belt and water pump should be replaced for scheduled maintenance.
You may want to degrease the engine to find the oil leak source. It may be something easier to do while it is apart for a timing belt, like replacing front cam seals, spark plug tubes or valve cover gaskets, for instance.
If you will be doing your own work, you may want to invest in a factory service manual.
 

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I haven't had good luck with any Bosch plugs. I usually ended up removing them in 8-10k because of a misfire. Maybe the Bosch Platinum2s are better than their others. I always went back to a factory specified plug and got longer plug life back.

Bad wires can knock out a coil pack, I'd check them as noted above.
 

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+1 on Techron. I try to use it every 5-6K miles.

As far as plugs go I usually go with the factory recommendation or equivalent. I don't use any of the expensive, fancy plugs (E3, Bosch2, Bosch+4, etc) - all they do is drain more money from your wallet and don't necessarily result in better performance.
 

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Bosch plugs always gave me a rougher idle than the stock Champions. The Bosch+4 were the worst.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gotcha. Appreciate the information. I actually have the Haynes manual for it but I wonder if Chilton would be better. I took off drivers side rim and behind that I found what looked like a timing belt cover. When I took it off there are 2 sprockets. Like ten speed bicycle size but no chain. I assume its on other side and I'm prob going to have to take apart a few things, power st pump, motor mounts, oxy sensor harnesses or something, etc to get to timing chain. (Or belt) But yea, I'm doing all I poss can myself. I assume I need to get factory wires, champion plugs and should I get anything like a distributor? Prob stupid question! Well, def appreciate all help. A whole bunch, so thanks a lot and I'll check back for any more info in morning.
 

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i think when you removed the cover on the driver's side you were viewing the transfer gears for the transmission.
 

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Actually your public library may have a good selection of service manuals. A large, main library might have a subscription to Alldata so you can print out the section of the repair that you are working on.
The Chrysler factory manual is always the most comprehensive, but Motors, Mitchells and Chiltons are runner-ups and all have their strengths and weaknesses. You will find a paper or CD factory manuals for sale online. They may be expensive, but think of it as a necessary tool purchase. Beware pirate copies may be incomplete/misrepresented. Watch seller ratings.
The 1995-2000 JA cars (Cirrus/Stratus) also used the same Mitsubishi 2.5L engine and were similar in many mechanical respects to the 1996-2000 JX convertible.
If you plan on doing your own work, a premium service manual is indispensable. Floor jack, jack stands, wheel chocks, air compressor/air tools, rags and a comfortable working area are also important.
Safety is paramount. It seems around here I read about a car falling on a guy about once a year.
A pre-warmed engine seems to unbolt easier as the threadlock softens with heat. A broken or stripped bolt can bring a repair operation to a grinding halt.
The timing belt is on the passenger side. The oil pan will need a stand with a block of wood supporting it while the right side motor mount is removed. The power steering pump bolts (15mm) and rearmost valve cover bolts (10mm) are in a tight spot, but doable. The first time doing anything is always the learning curve. Give yourself plenty of time and take breaks when needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ohhhh, transfer gears for transmission! Thank you. And the information Imperial Crown laid out is invaluable. I think Imperial Crown has replied to a bunch of posts with important and valuable, insightful info. Well, still haven't checked or replaced timing chain or belt yet but am going to very soon. I thought the convertible was sold which is why I hadn't done it yet. But the check never cashed so the keys never left my hand. Oh well, back to work on the Sebring 2.5 vert. Thanks for every piece of info and help all ya'll give! Very much too, Marc-
 
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