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Is it a good idea to cut passenger cars?

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  • Yes

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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
GM to kill Volt, Cruze, Impala, LaCrosse, XTS, CT6 in 2019



General Motors is killing several passenger cars, including the Chevrolet Volt and Chevrolet Cruze, two compact vehicles that were held up as examples of the automaker's post-bankruptcy revival.

The move — part of a sweeping cost-cutting plan unveiled Monday — comes as Americans are abandoning passenger cars in favor of crossovers, SUVs and pickups.

The automaker will no longer make the Volt semi-electric car and the Cruze compact sedan for sale in North America beginning in March, Chevy spokesman Kevin Kelly confirmed.

GM will also discontinue the Chevrolet Impala full-size car, the company confirmed. It will end U.S. production in March and Canadian production in the fourth quarter of 2019.

Kelly declined to say whether the company would sell any of those products in markets outside North America.

The company will also end U.S. sales of the Cadillac XTS and Buick LaCrosse luxury cars after production ends in March. And the Cadillac CT6 will be killed off in the U.S. after mid-2019, though it will continue to be sold in China.


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Plymouth Makes It
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It appears that the imports are picking up the slack left in this area including high end German stuff. Not all just cost factor.
 

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Well, it seems that Marchionne truly was a visionary when he killed the 200 and the Dart ahead of time.
This leaves me worried about the Charger and 300 though.
Sergio did make the correct choice but make no doubt about it, he made it because he was painted into a corner. I don't believe the plan was initiated by the vision that sedan sales would suddenly tank. The need to maximise the manufacturing of the current moneymakers Jeep and Ram created the Great Re-shuffle. Killing the Dart and 200 was probably the most significant part of the plan, but if the cars had been doing better, they may have tried harder to save them throwing the whole plan into disarray. Circumstances laid the pieces in front of Sergio. Thankfully he had the vision and guts to put it together in a manner that worked.

The 300 is dead. The Challenger continues to grow in sales. The Dodge L cars continue with cost savings assistance from the Alfa, just not in the traditional shared platform sense.
 

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Sergio did make the correct choice but make no doubt about it, he made it because he was painted into a corner. I don't believe the plan was initiated by the vision that sedan sales would suddenly tank. The need to maximise the manufacturing of the current moneymakers Jeep and Ram created the Great Re-shuffle. Killing the Dart and 200 was probably the most significant part of the plan, but if the cars had been doing bette
It's a shame they won't reconsider keeping the 300 though. It would be an opportunity to keep themselves on a segment with little to no competition. However, considering that Honda has been having problems to sell the Accord I don't think FCA will take that risk. After all, they're very conservative and risk averse.
 

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I agree @Deckard_Cain. I'd love to see FCA/Chrysler change their mind and be the big fish in the (very) small pond of upscale sedans. I d probably be burned as a 300 heretic, but an all new 300 as a tall-but-not-a-crossover sedan with a new powerful/upscale "T" model would be a bold new direction.
 

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The 300 is dead. The Challenger continues to grow in sales. The Dodge L cars continue with cost savings assistance from the Alfa, just not in the traditional shared platform sense.
As I read the arguments for keeping 300 and discontinuing 300, I find myself agreeing with some parts of each of the arguments....which leaves me wondering if there couldn't be some sort of compromise:

What about going ahead with discontinuing the 300...BUT offer a special option / appearance package for both Charger and Challenger which would eliminate as much of the the "boy-racer" agressive look & feel as possible, while at the same time turning up the dial on the soft ride / luxurious feel and look....AND keeping all the power....but toning it down so it doesn't sound and feel like something that should be racing at the Indianapolis 500.

In essence...what you would have would be sub-models of Challenger / Charger.

For lack of more creative names...I dub these "sub-models" "Challenger-Monaco Edition, and Charger-Diplomat Edition


OH!...By the way...this would NOT involve any changes in sheet metal.
 

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The LX300 could be changed to a "new" type of car. Give it a differant look. raise the roof line a inch or 2 and the ride hight a 1inch or 2, redisgn the interior for maore space. It would kind of be like a car from the early 50;s.. Large door openings big windows and tall seats where you just slide in instead of crouching down or climbing up.
 

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Just heard on late news that GM is closing 5 plants, can't be good for the economy.
 

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The LX300 could be changed to a "new" type of car. Give it a differant look. raise the roof line a inch or 2 and the ride hight a 1inch or 2, redisgn the interior for maore space. It would kind of be like a car from the early 50;s.. Large door openings big windows and tall seats where you just slide in instead of crouching down or climbing up.
I can't help but think that this sedan-apocalypse isn't self-inflicted by the brands. Their making sedans lower and "sportier", yet people are shifting their dollars to SUVs that have higher ride height and are less sporty.
Yet, no manufacturer offers a sedan with higher ride height. They double down on sportier sedans.
 

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The LX300 could be changed to a "new" type of car. Give it a differant look. raise the roof line a inch or 2 and the ride hight a 1inch or 2, redisgn the interior for maore space. It would kind of be like a car from the early 50;s.. Large door openings big windows and tall seats where you just slide in instead of crouching down or climbing up.
It sounds like you're describing a 21st. Century take on the Forward look models:
 

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If the 300 goes away, the timing should be such that a new product should launch before that time. We've been promised a CUV version based off the Pacifica, a Chrysler "Grand Commander", etc. on the see no new Chrysler models in the showrooms.
Say what you want about GM cutting away their sedans, but the brands losing sedans are at least populated with CUVs and SUVs that might help retain customers.
 

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As I read the arguments for keeping 300 and discontinuing 300, I find myself agreeing with some parts of each of the arguments....which leaves me wondering if there couldn't be some sort of compromise:

What about going ahead with discontinuing the 300...BUT offer a special option / appearance package for both Charger and Challenger which would eliminate as much of the the "boy-racer" agressive look & feel as possible, while at the same time turning up the dial on the soft ride / luxurious feel and look....AND keeping all the power....but toning it down so it doesn't sound and feel like something that should be racing at the Indianapolis 500.

In essence...what you would have would be sub-models of Challenger / Charger.

For lack of more creative names...I dub these "sub-models" "Challenger-Monaco Edition, and Charger-Diplomat Edition


OH!...By the way...this would NOT involve any changes in sheet metal.
Uhg, no thank you. They tried that plan in the 70's and produced this:


I firmly believe the Charger and Challenger have survived and thrived during the death of sedans is because they have stayed true to their modern muscle car mission. All the Chargers competitors got cold feet and started making flaky cars that are nothing but compromises. That includes the 300's watered down redesign. Trying to bring the 300 back through the Charger will only waste money and kill the Chargers momentum.
 

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I like the 300 and have a hard time with its impending passing. We have a lot of them at the airport, by customer demand. It is the last comfortable big car that's friendly to all its occupants. We did have some 300C models for the upscale clients, but they have been removed from service as they reach high mileage on the odometers. They have been replaced with 300S models and we also have a bunch of 300 touring models with AWD.

It is ironic that the Dodge Challenger is the last remaining business coupe. The Challenger models offered without a rear seat don't make the wisest fleet buys, but FCA fleet does offer a basic Challenger for fleets. It does have a rear seat, so it doesn't strictly follow the business coupe legacy. The Challenger offers a generous drivers position along with superior trunk volume. These Challengers are often rented out to corporate clients who use them in the traditional business coupe fashion. No other 2 door car can match the Challenger's qualifications for this purpose. We also have a few Challenger R/Ts. I think those are rented out for monkey business.:D

Don't mock the disco era Cordoba. It sold in numbers FCA can only dream about.
 

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I like the 300 and have a hard time with its impending passing. We have a lot of them at the airport, by customer demand. It is the last comfortable big car that's friendly to all its occupants. We did have some 300C models for the upscale clients, but they have been removed from service as they reach high mileage on the odometers. They have been replaced with 300S models and we also have a bunch of 300 touring models with AWD.

It is ironic that the Dodge Challenger is the last remaining business coupe. The Challenger models offered without a rear seat don't make the wisest fleet buys, but FCA fleet does offer a basic Challenger for fleets. It does have a rear seat, so it doesn't strictly follow the business coupe legacy. The Challenger offers a generous drivers position along with superior trunk volume. These Challengers are often rented out to corporate clients who use them in the traditional business coupe fashion. No other 2 door car can match the Challenger's qualifications for this purpose. We also have a few Challenger R/Ts. I think those are rented out for monkey business.:D

Don't mock the disco era Cordoba. It sold in numbers FCA can only dream about.
I hear what you're saying about the desires of rental customers, but the larger issue is those same customers demanding the 300 at the airport are not buying the 300 for themselves. If fleet sales brought the same margin as retail sales, there may be a better business case for the 300, but then I doubt fleets would pay the extra cost. There doesn't seem to be a magic bullet or even a fair risk to warrant keeping the 300 in production and that's a darn shame.:(

The Mustang II was also a hot seller in the 70's. Good selling cars during a certain point in time doesn't necessarily mean they were good cars.;)
 
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Don't mock the disco era Cordoba. It sold in numbers FCA can only dream about.
The Cordoba did. it's Dodge cousins (Charger then Magnum then Mirada) didn't sell nearly as well.
 
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The Cordoba did. it's Dodge cousins (Charger then Magnum then Mirada) didn't sell nearly as well.
Had the Cordoba being badged as a Plymouth (or the Charger got more styling differences), I wonder if things could had been different for Dodge? Or imagine what if DeSoto was still around during the 1st oil crash, would the Cordoba being badged as a DeSoto instead of Chrysler?
 

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Had the Cordoba being badged as a Plymouth (or the Charger got more styling differences), I wonder if things could had been different for Dodge? Or imagine what if DeSoto was still around during the 1st oil crash, would the Cordoba being badged as a DeSoto instead of Chrysler?
Cordoba would have failed (i.e.: sold in Dodge volume numbers as a Plymouth or DeSoto. It was a combination of Chrysler's (then) premium image and a good price point along with nice styling and equipment levels that sold the car. Without Chrysler's panache it would have been an also ran.

Different styling didn't help the Dodge (see 1978-1979 Dodge Magnum).
 
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