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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
act weird.
My 2006, 300 thermometer is starting to stay at an hours old temp after years of working great.
Where is this thing located and can it be addressed?
Something is sticking and now relaying the correct temp to the digital dash.

Thanks
 

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On my '06 Ram 1500 the outside temperature display won't really update until about 5 minutes or 4 miles after being started. There have been times it displayed -40 F when it was actually 95+ F outside. LOL! Within a few minutes it would display the correct temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On my '06 Ram 1500 the outside temperature display won't really update until about 5 minutes or 4 miles after being started. There have been times it displayed -40 F when it was actually 95+ F outside. LOL! Within a few minutes it would display the correct temperature.
Thanks. Mine is taking hours and hours. The part is failing apparently.
Hey, in my local area I am starting to try to follow a few pickups that might be up for sale from individuals.
Any particular thing to love or avoid in a Ram 1500 about your year? My 300 is an 06. I've typically owned chevy pickups but want to look around more this time. I'm going to need it for light work with a small trailer and occasional tiny camping trailer. Will Dodge's tranny's be a problem? Anything you can add for that year model or a little older would be great.
Thanks again.
 

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My 2005 300c failed to update the temp and the reflash mentioned fixed it. Otherwise you'd probably have a bad sensor. It's located somewhere behind the grill if I remember correctly.
 
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They may want to diagnose this first. I know that the 2005 LX had a software (flash) update, I'm not positive on the 2006 LX.
If they do determine that a flash update will fix it, get all the module updates done at the same time while the tool is connected to the car. A PCM/TCM update can make a big improvement in driving and shift quality.
Are you a regular or have a preferred Chrysler dealership that you have been to in the past?
Most dealership service depts. have a 'diagnostic fee' which is their minimum charge. It is generally 1 hour labor. There may be a 5% shop supplies charge added. That equates to about $100 around here. Prices vary slightly across the country depending on locality.
Smaller dealers may have less overhead than a large dealership. Dealerships that are out to impress potential new customers may offer you more.
Different dealers work in different ways. Sometimes you can barter with the service advisor, ask if he has any 10% coupons behind the counter, service specials going on or discounts? Are you a senior or a vet?
If he wants the work in the shop, he will usually work with you. If they are very busy, there may be no bartering. If you have other things that need to be done, sometimes combining services helps. Right now, my old dealer is scheduling work a week ahead. Busy is good. It is the A/C season.
They may recommend other work at your visit. Listen to the suggestions and as long as nothing is urgent, take note and say you'll consider it for another visit.
The actual module reprogramming isn't a difficult or long process in itself, but a Chrysler dealer is really the only source for these updates.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They may want to diagnose this first. I know that the 2005 LX had a software (flash) update, I'm not positive on the 2006 LX.
If they do determine that a flash update will fix it, get all the module updates done at the same time while the tool is connected to the car. A PCM/TCM update can make a big improvement in driving and shift quality.
Are you a regular or have a preferred Chrysler dealership that you have been to in the past?
Most dealership service depts. have a 'diagnostic fee' which is their minimum charge. It is generally 1 hour labor. There may be a 5% shop supplies charge added. That equates to about $100 around here. Prices vary slightly across the country depending on locality.
Smaller dealers may have less overhead than a large dealership. Dealerships that are out to impress potential new customers may offer you more.
Different dealers work in different ways. Sometimes you can barter with the service advisor, ask if he has any 10% coupons behind the counter, service specials going on or discounts? Are you a senior or a vet?
If he wants the work in the shop, he will usually work with you. If they are very busy, there may be no bartering. If you have other things that need to be done, sometimes combining services helps. Right now, my old dealer is scheduling work a week ahead. Busy is good. It is the A/C season.
They may recommend other work at your visit. Listen to the suggestions and as long as nothing is urgent, take note and say you'll consider it for another visit.
The actual module reprogramming isn't a difficult or long process in itself, but a Chrysler dealer is really the only source for these updates.
Wow. That covers it. I'm pretty much a senior, but may not be old enough to qualify. I'll ask though.
 

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If you tell them you are a senior in a solemn tone, they usually won't proof you. :D
 

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Any particular thing to love or avoid in a Ram 1500 about your year? My 300 is an 06. I've typically owned chevy pickups but want to look around more this time. I'm going to need it for light work with a small trailer and occasional tiny camping trailer. Will Dodge's tranny's be a problem? Anything you can add for that year model or a little older would be great.
Thanks again.
Some of the '05's and earlier had differential issues - something to be aware of. Basically, the "C" clamps in the limited slip differentials would break apart and could get chewed up by the gears.

The HVAC doors of this generation ('02-'08) is another area of concern. The doors are actuated by small motors. The motors don't usually fail, but there is a tendency for the stop pins on the doors to crack and break over time. That can result in the doors failing. On my '06 the recirc door literally fell off onto the fan motor (had to remove the fan motor to pull it out) and the mode 2 door (controls defrost/floor direction) failed several years ago so I if I select floor (for heat) it defaulted to defrost. Recently, I've noticed the select control won't change to defrost. In this case I believe the control module may be shot, but it could be a failed mode 1 door. I haven't had it to the shop yet.

I found the Hemi to be reliable. Mine has over 233K on it. Averages 17.5 mpg.

The 4.7L is adequate for light towing and hauling. Marginally less fuel mileage. It's worth it to get the Hemi. Basically you get about 60 more hp and slightly better fuel mileage (the Hemi doesn't have to work as hard to pull the same load).
 
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I think that the '06 Ram 1500 Hemi has MDS (cylinder deactivation) and the '05 doesn't. It got another 1 or 2 mpg on the highway than the 4.7L.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Some of the '05's and earlier had differential issues - something to be aware of. Basically, the "C" clamps in the limited slip differentials would break apart and could get chewed up by the gears.

The HVAC doors of this generation ('02-'08) is another area of concern. The doors are actuated by small motors. The motors don't usually fail, but there is a tendency for the stop pins on the doors to crack and break over time. That can result in the doors failing. On my '06 the recirc door literally fell off onto the fan motor (had to remove the fan motor to pull it out) and the mode 2 door (controls defrost/floor direction) failed several years ago so I if I select floor (for heat) it defaulted to defrost. Recently, I've noticed the select control won't change to defrost. In this case I believe the control module may be shot, but it could be a failed mode 1 door. I haven't had it to the shop yet.

I found the Hemi to be reliable. Mine has over 233K on it. Averages 17.5 mpg.

The 4.7L is adequate for light towing and hauling. Marginally less fuel mileage. It's worth it to get the Hemi. Basically you get about 60 more hp and slightly better fuel mileage (the Hemi doesn't have to work as hard to pull the same load).
Thanks for the rundown. Now I'm a little bit up to date. And it's weird about the hvac doors because my next question was about mine beginning to get sluggish. Not wanting to switch from defrost to cabin or to the floor.
I've heard people say that if they are just getting weak or sticky that you can spray something into the vents that helps lubricate or clean them. some random thing that was used off label. I can't remember what it was and don't know if it really helps. Thanks
 

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The blend and mode doors are run by small electric feedback stepper motors (actuators) so the HVAC control knows how far open or closed the doors are. The doors can stick, the actuator gears can bind and the dash HVAC controls can get intermittent.
Usually if the doors stick, you will hear a 'click-click-click' noise as the actuator gear over-runs and tries to move the door. Some doors inside the HVAC housing may have rubber edges to help seal the chamber air passage when closed. Some have an adhesive foam tape that can fall off and block door movement. I have found adhesive paper labels that have fallen into a door path and jammed it. Dog hair and other dust/debris can stick to the grease of an actuator gear rack and jam gear movement. Try to see what is actually happening (or not happening) first and go from there.
Just spraying a silicone spray-type lubricant into the vent outlets is very hit-or-miss if it is a door sticking issue. It is best to disassemble the housing to a point where you may actually see where the door is binding and remedy it from that point.
Door re-calibration may also be needed after a repair. The HVAC controller can run tests and store useful fault codes to aid in diagnosis.
Help no hot air - Chrysler 300C Forum: 300C & SRT8 Forums
A door that is binding may be seen as a 'false' stop and the the calibration procedure won't really help.
Always diagnose first.
 
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I think that the '06 Ram 1500 Hemi has MDS (cylinder deactivation) and the '05 doesn't. It got another 1 or 2 mpg on the highway than the 4.7L.
Correct. Another difference between the Hemi and the 4.7L.

Note - We had a 2010 Ram 1500 4.7L as a rental. That version of the 4.7L had 330 hp which was almost comparable to the 345 hp of my Hemi. The 2010 rode nicer empty due to the coil springs vs my '06's leaf springs. The grunt of the Hemi was still much better than the 4.7L.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
@ImperialCrown . Can I buy a tranny dipstick? I understand dealers only change fluid not flush in these vehicles due to moving around bad metal shavings and such. But I would like to be able to at least know where and what my fluid looks like.
This 06 300 has shifted a little weird at about 30 or 31 mph in town driving for at least 5 years. Idk if it was always that way or not. It has been serviced regularly.
I also want to know if this tranny will bug out if I try to pull a tiny pop up camping trailer or a small utility trailer? The work trailer is the better chance of happening on a regular basis if I know the car won't give up the transmission ghost because of it.
I'm talking tiny on the camping trailer. Twin bed and a sink basically. Covered by aluminum with the interior made of balsa wood, ha.
 

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For the towing consult your owner's manual. Off hand I'd say you'd be okay towing a small camper. Definitely plan on having the transmission serviced regularly if you tow a lot.

Some dealer will do flushes. One small one near me actually pushed the flushed using BG products claiming the filters would get "cleaned" by the flush. Needless to say I walked away from that offer. My normal servicing dealer recommends the traditional dropping the pan method the first time and then alternate flushes with dropping the pan.
 
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Is this a 2.7L, 3.5L or 5.7L 300?
Agree that some dealers will do the ATF+4 transfusion, but for that the old filter is still in there and the pan bottom/magnet debris situation is unknown.
If this is at an independent shop with one transfusion machine, you don't know what other ATFs could be mixed into what your car gets.
The service manual still recommends the pan drop/filter change as the preferred method of transmission service even though not all the fluid gets changed.
If the outside of the transmission is dry, your fluid level should be good. If the underside is wet with ATF, then there is a leak and the fluid level could be low.
There are dipsticks (I use a piece of old speedometer cable) to measure level, then you have to approximate the transmission fluid temperature to estimate the correct level.
The level can vary almost an 1.5" in a 100°F temperature shift. Overfilling and underfilling must be avoided. I purchased a handheld laser pointed temperature gun from Harbor Freight to point at the trans pan to measure temperature.
The old days of 'Full' and 'Add' on a dipstick are over. People were grossly overfilling transmissions and/or using the wrong fluid. It seems that after the automakers took away the dipstick, they cut their transmission warranty problems in half. Use ATF+4 only.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Is this a 2.7L, 3.5L or 5.7L 300?
Agree that some dealers will do the ATF+4 transfusion, but for that the old filter is still in there and the pan bottom/magnet debris situation is unknown.
If this is at an independent shop with one transfusion machine, you don't know what other ATFs could be mixed into what your car gets.
The service manual still recommends the pan drop/filter change as the preferred method of transmission service even though not all the fluid gets changed.
If the outside of the transmission is dry, your fluid level should be good. If the underside is wet with ATF, then there is a leak and the fluid level could be low.
There are dipsticks (I use a piece of old speedometer cable) to measure level, then you have to approximate the transmission fluid temperature to estimate the correct level.
The level can vary almost an 1.5" in a 100°F temperature shift. Overfilling and underfilling must be avoided. I purchased a handheld laser pointed temperature gun from Harbor Freight to point at the trans pan to measure temperature.
The old days of 'Full' and 'Add' on a dipstick are over. People were grossly overfilling transmissions and/or using the wrong fluid. It seems that after the automakers took away the dipstick, they cut their transmission warranty problems in half. Use ATF+4 only.
3.5 and thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Is this a 2.7L, 3.5L or 5.7L 300?
Agree that some dealers will do the ATF+4 transfusion, but for that the old filter is still in there and the pan bottom/magnet debris situation is unknown.
If this is at an independent shop with one transfusion machine, you don't know what other ATFs could be mixed into what your car gets.
The service manual still recommends the pan drop/filter change as the preferred method of transmission service even though not all the fluid gets changed.
If the outside of the transmission is dry, your fluid level should be good. If the underside is wet with ATF, then there is a leak and the fluid level could be low.
There are dipsticks (I use a piece of old speedometer cable) to measure level, then you have to approximate the transmission fluid temperature to estimate the correct level.
The level can vary almost an 1.5" in a 100°F temperature shift. Overfilling and underfilling must be avoided. I purchased a handheld laser pointed temperature gun from Harbor Freight to point at the trans pan to measure temperature.
The old days of 'Full' and 'Add' on a dipstick are over. People were grossly overfilling transmissions and/or using the wrong fluid. It seems that after the automakers took away the dipstick, they cut their transmission warranty problems in half. Use ATF+4 only.
Man! You know your stuff. I have not fixed the problems yet but at least I know what to do. Thanks
Also, off topic, but I have been looking for a an old work truck to do light contract work again as a semi retired guy, and I have been bumping into the occasional used car deal that could be resold for a little side money.
Do you know a forum or way to hob nob with folks who do this more than accidentally? Haha. I've made money on different cars in my life, but usually by accident.
thanks pete
 
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