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I have a 2010 Chrysler 300 and the oem lights are quite poor, has anyone had sucess with the aftermarket HID lights. The following is an example of what i was thinking of using. They call this a CAN bus compatible unit, but I am assuming that in the car there is a "load center" that monitors current to the lights and then sends a message via CAN to the dash if there is a problem. So this unit would draw the same current as the oem lights so the load center does not send a fault code???

http://www.ultrahid.com/cahidkitp.html
 

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Keeping in mind that unit is apparently just the interface for HID lights you already bought from someone else. +1 on what Bob just said.

http://danielsternlighting.com/

http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/bulbs/Hid/conversions/conversions.html

http://danielsternlighting.com/tech/lights/light_color/light_color.html

"So you've read about HID headlamps and have it in mind to convert your car. A few mouse clicks on the web, and you've found a couple of outfits offering to sell you a "conversion" that will fit any car with a given type of halogen bulb. STOP! Put away that credit card."

"Kits for replacement of standard round or rectangular sealed-beam headlamps usually include a poor-quality replaceable-bulb headlight lens-reflector unit that's not safe or legal even when equipped with the intended (usually H4) halogen bulb"

"The most dangerous part of the attempt to "retrofit" Xenon headlamps is that sometimes you get a deceptive and illusory "improvement" in the performance of the headlamp. The performance of the headlamp is perceived to be "better" because of the much higher level of foreground lighting (on the road immediately in front of the car). However, the beam patterns produced by this kind of "conversion" virtually always give lessdistance light, and often an alarming lack of light where there's meant to be a relative maximum in light intensity. The result is the illusion that you can see better than you actually can, and that's not safe."

"In virtually every first-world country, HID "retrofits" into halogen headlamps are illegal. "
 

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Be aware that the beam pattern is different for HID than conventional beam. There may be nothing wrong with your headlamps.

The beam pattern of HID headlamps is different from anything most U.S. drivers are accustomed to. It is a common beam pattern for European drivers. HID headlamps define the top of their beams with a sharp horizontal line compared with most halogen headlamps' gradual fade to darkness. This light to dark boundary forms a "hockey stick" pattern (see sketch below) on a wall. Customers are drawn to the pattern bouncing on the road and tend to believe that their headlamps are aimed too low. Do not adjust the headlamps. The pattern is required to prevent light glare to oncoming drivers. The beam pattern was developed according to legal requirements and is a normal condition with HID headlamps.

While the 'hockey stick' shape has been softened into more of a 'spotlight' beam over the years, you don't have the wide area of liighting down the road like conventional halogen headlamps did. It may take getting used to.
 

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KOG
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Aftermarket HIDs are junk. OEM ones are great.
 

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Silverstars work, the main argument there is whether the higher cost and shorter life are acceptable. Your bulbs may be near the end of their life if they're original.
 

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Has anyone tried something like this?...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iviAlp6x3m0
I did something similar w/ a GM product that worked well.
 

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I loved The Wonder Years. (and City Slickers, too)
 

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I live in Mexico and although I try to drive the 78 miles home from market in the daylight, I sometimes can not make itn time. The road is dangerously potholed and the asphalt color tinted cattle often hold meetings on the centerline. I just ordered a pair of Hella 100/80 bulbs for my '95 Spirit, but now I understand they are not dependable or even that bright. What else can I do to dramatically improve lighting on a deserted road without blocking off precious radiator airflow through the grillwork, or blocking the headlamps? I have seen aftermarket lamp assemblies jiggle like crazy on bad roads and the light pattern will drive a person crazy. Thank you.
 

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KOG
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Use a relay with the Hellas and you'll have significantly more light than stock.
 

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Loved my good old all metal quality fog lamps. They met their demise on a parking block that was made 1" taller than every other one I parked with my bumper over. ='( Think they were PILOT brand. Kinda forget now. NBD, wife won't let me get another set anyway. Why do they charge so much for those things?
 
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