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I am a big fan of the cable show Holmes on Homes, being retired out of the trades. Some of the "wrong" stuff he has to fix is quite astounding. Bad pluming spewing sewer fumes, dangerous jury-rigged wiring, rotting structure, leaking roofs, no heat coming to rooms, foundations crumbling, sagging floors and rot and mold covered up by drywall just to hide it seems to be the norm; etc etc... while in the USA we have housing issues, there are things on Holmes worse than I ever seen here.

So i pose this question to Canadians here. Is Canadian housing and building practices in such a sorry state as portrayed on this show?
 

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Dr. Z said:
I've seen similar stuff here in the US, believe me. It's not a Canadian thing. It's a moron thing.
Yep, and just how closely things are inspected varies so much by state or local jusrisdiction.
New homes here (in Georgia) are thrown together in ways that scare me. I don't think I'd buy a new house here.
 

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Radioactive
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You also have to remember that this is entertainment. :)

I don't watch TV so I can't give any current examples, but just ask yourself "Are most Americans as [pathetic condition] as the people on [reality show]?"
 

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Getting $20,000 worth of renovation done for 10 or even 5,000 leads to the kinds of things you see on there. The other part of the problem is shady characters who count on homeowners not having a clue or not around to see what's going on, and even well meaning people who don't have a clue. Houses done for a quick flip and inspector greased palms and the new homeowner gets all the nasty stuff as shown. I imagine this happens everywhere.
 

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It's basically a lack of proper maintenance thing, man. A house it just like a car. It needs attention to things from time to time and if you ignore them, then you're going to run into problems. I walk around my house once per month and look at the paint, windows, gutters etc. If wasps are building a nest, I knock them out. It's my house, not theirs. Heck, I do plumbing, electrical, carpentry work and painting on my own home. I can't afford to pay someone else, so have learned out of necessity. Right now, for example, I'm ripping out all of the old carpet and installing laminate floors. I'm gimpy from a bad knee and leg, but I'll eventually get it all done. Hopefully by the end of October before it starts to get chilly here again!
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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It's my experience that for the owner of a single-family dwelling, it's easy to ignore building codes and permitting processes, and with basically no real ramifications to ignoring codes it's very hard to do anything about it. Even at transaction, when homes are deficient it's basically just information-as-noted here, with the new homeowner not being required to fix it in many circumstances.

If people followed codes correctly initially then there'd be no need for permitting or inspection other than for revenue generation, either immediately in the cost for the permit, or long-term for property tax changes based on property improvements.

As many issues as there are with homes that are privately owned and occupied, I take real exception for properties that are revenue-generators, basically rentals. My experience with landlords and their maintenance and repair has been significantly more negative than positive, and I'm glad that I haven't had to rent in years and years, and hopefully won't have to rent ever again. Landlords cut so many corners to keep costs down that it can become unsafe for the tenants, without their being fully aware of what's actually amiss.
 

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I hear you, man.This house was a rental property when we purchased it. I had to rip out the old, flea infested carpet, then rip up the floor in the bathroom and dining room because renters had let a leak in the bathroom go unrepaired and rot the subfloor and several floor joists out. I have done a lot of work on my home. I improved it so much from the time I started working on it until the realtor came out to see it, that she drove right past it because she didn't recognize it! It's amazing what some yard work and paint can do the change the exterior of a house!
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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We were landlords for a year, we bought our new house when the market was at its bottom and the new house was cheapest, and held on to the old house as a rental until the market improved to the point that it was break-even. Because it had been my wife's first house ever, were were probably over-diligent as landlords, and it was just too hard on her to deal with wear and tear from someone else on her house.

Maybe we could be landlords on a property that we don't have an emotional attachment to, but I don't really know if it's worth the effort or not honestly.
 

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There is no way I'd ever want to be a landlord. I've seen what people around here do to rentals. One of my old childhood neighbors has several rental properties and he told me he had to kick one tenant out because the moron had cut a hole in the living room ceiling and was grilling in there. When Troy asked him why, he said it was because he couldn't afford an oven for the kitchen!!!
 
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