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Discussion Starter #1
With the following parameters:

You and the dealer both know where the car is (another dealer 25 miles away), and the dealer has agreed to get it.

Just wondering what has to go down to get a car at dealership A to a customer at dealership B to be purchased...
 

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Pretty straight forward as long as both dealers agree to trade or give up the car in question. In your case they would cut a check for the invoice price of the car and go pick it up from the other dealer. Shouldn't take more than a day at most.
 

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Pretty straight forward as long as both dealers agree to trade or give up the car in question. In your case they would cut a check for the invoice price of the car and go pick it up from the other dealer. Shouldn't take more than a day at most.
Hmm.... Well, it's taking longer than that. Which has me a little concerned. Gave him a deposit for it on Tuesday and after the handshake and the signature it's been radio silence. Debating whether or not to begin hasseling tomorrow....
 

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Let me know if/when you need me to call ;)

Sometimes the other dealer can be a PITA. I wonder if the other dealer, in this case, sold something that hadn't arrived yet.
Entirely possible, or they sold the car they agreed to trade.....I cant count how many times that happened when I was selling cars. It took almost 2 weeks before I got my 200S, the people that went and picked up the original one wrecked it on the way back to the dealer and the one I have had to be brought in from Orlando. Best bet is to make a phone call or show up and ask whats going on.
 

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Problem is you are assuming the dealer that has the car is willing to trade it. As Nick stated if an agreement to trade or purchase has been made the acquiring of the vehicle should take no more than 48hrs. Odds are there is a problem with the trading dealer(dealer that has the car) they either sold it or are not willing to trade it.
 

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Jared,

I have a simmilar situation going on at my dealership today. A customer wants an automatic Dart that another closer dealer had prommised to trade. Unfortunately that dealer sold the car underneath us. However we were only able to find another one as of last night and are attempting to send a drive today to get the car.
 

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It can also mess things up if you have gone to that other dealer or inquired about it. They may think they have it sold and wont trade it. Your dealer may also not have anything of value to the other dealer for trade.
 

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Shouldn't take more than 48hrs.

That however is assuming your dealer did the proper legwork to start off, like calling to see if the car was even available, and that the other dealer is not being an jerk about giving your dealer the car.

That or your dealer is just lazy and figures he will get to it when he gets to it, start bugging them about it already, figure out what is going on or ask for your money back and go buy it elsewhere.
 

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If the two dealers have the same corporate finance company, then they just need to execute the agreed-to trade and "swap paper", so to speak. No real need to get a check cut for that, from what I've seen, in the scenario I've mentioned. In some cases, doing the complete "buy" with a company check is the only way some dealers will work, but this can be problematic in some cases. I knew of one dealer that was going to other dealers to get vehicles for their new car customers. They'd take the check to the selling dealer, get the vehicle, sell the vehicle to their customer . . . and then the customer never did get the license plates for their new car. And, as we later learned, the checks bounced after that particular dealer "left town".

Remember, too, that sales at a dealership are dynamic and always moving, usually. There have been times when two salespeople were working deals on the same vehicle. Each customer was promised the vehicle, but it turned out that whoever got their first, got into the finance office first, got the car. The other salesperson had no knowledge that it was "already sold".

If you go into the manufacturer's website and "Build Your ______", once you do that, you can then use that website to link to the vehicle locator website, which will then tell you what other local dealers, or some not-so-local dealers have, in their inventory . . . according to the manufacturer. It'll pull up the window sticker and also give you the VIN. With that information, you can then go to your preferred dealer and let your preferred salesperson then do the search and make the contact with the other dealer. IF you might go to the other dealer during normal business hours, get hooked up with a salesperson, giving them your information, then THEY consider you as a possible buyer, so they might put a hold on the vehicle for a particular period of time, to hold it for you. Or it might be that there are other deals working on that particular car, too, at the other dealership.

So, build your vehicle on the manufacturer's website, check available inventory and window sticker pricing, then go to your preferred dealer and see what kind of deal they'll cut you for the vehicle, plus the additional charge to cover their costs in getting the vehicle from the other dealer. Let THEM do the legwork and such themselves.

With the old GMAC, it was no problem to do a "swap paper" type of dealer trade. No money changed hands, just a call to GMAC to let them know who had which vehicle, in the end. A matter of taking the respective vehicle from one dealer's floorplan to the others. On the Chrysler side, it might not work that way now, though. Hence the need for "purchases" rather than "trades".

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 
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