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Thats quite a interesting article. My first car was a 1984 Ford Tempo. I really did like the car but the carb was pretty well crap on it. If you dont have a nice tuned carb you will get terrible MPG. I was the only person in high school to have a car with a carb. Carbs before the 1980s can be pretty easy to work on though.
 

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Owning a carburetor and ignition shop in the late 70s and still working on cars as a sideline after selling the business, I saw the real bad side of carbureted, emission compliant vehicles. The feedback carburetor was a stopgap until EFI became cheaper and more reliable. Some of the first US EFI systems were throttle body injection, or TBI. These were a simple low pressure one or two nozzle units that could be installed in place of a carburetor with minimal changes.

Once OBD-II requirements were rolled out, almost everything went to port injection, many if not most were sequential injection with multiple O2 sensors for more precise control. HD vehicles (those over 8500 GVW) could still be built as non-OBD-II compliant. Ford kept building bank fired EFI 460 engines through 1997. I am more familiar with what Ford did than either GM or Chrysler, my later GM cars were Diesels and all of my Chrysler products have been FWD 4 or V6.

Virtually everything Detroit does is a cost vs need calculation so sometimes it gets interesting, 1987 Chevy trucks come to mind, the TBI system looked like it was a last minute change, on the pickups and Blazers the wiring was sort of draped over the engine, on the vans it came through the engine cover which meant it had to be disconnected and them reconnected in order to do a tune up and run the engine to check the timing.
 

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Except for the non-turbo Omni/Horizons and trucks, Chrysler passenger cars were all EFI by mid-1985.
The trucks became EFI (except for the 5.9L which had the Quadrajet) in 1987½ . The Omni/Horizon became EFI in 1988.
The Colts kept carburetors until 1990. By then, the carburetor had been so over-developed in order to pass emissions, that EFI was the way to go.
Almost immediately, almost all complaints about stalling, no-starts, backfires, poor fuel economy, hesitation and rough idle vanished.
 

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Owning a carburetor and ignition shop in the late 70s and still working on cars as a sideline after selling the business, I saw the real bad side of carbureted, emission compliant vehicles. The feedback carburetor was a stopgap until EFI became cheaper and more reliable. Some of the first US EFI systems were throttle body injection, or TBI. These were a simple low pressure one or two nozzle units that could be installed in place of a carburetor with minimal changes.

Once OBD-II requirements were rolled out, almost everything went to port injection, many if not most were sequential injection with multiple O2 sensors for more precise control. HD vehicles (those over 8500 GVW) could still be built as non-OBD-II compliant. Ford kept building bank fired EFI 460 engines through 1997. I am more familiar with what Ford did than either GM or Chrysler, my later GM cars were Diesels and all of my Chrysler products have been FWD 4 or V6.

Virtually everything Detroit does is a cost vs need calculation so sometimes it gets interesting, 1987 Chevy trucks come to mind, the TBI system looked like it was a last minute change, on the pickups and Blazers the wiring was sort of draped over the engine, on the vans it came through the engine cover which meant it had to be disconnected and them reconnected in order to do a tune up and run the engine to check the timing.
Funny you mention the 1987 chevy trucks and blazers. I have a 1987 Chevy R10 with a stock 5.7.
 

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I only knew that from working on one of each, group leader at the lab I worked in had a 1987 K5 Blazer, a friend had a 1987 G10, both 350s with TBI.
 

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My dad bought a '72 VW type 3 that had Fuel Injection...which was the first modern mass marketed fuel injected car. It actually came to market in '68. I do remember my dad saying a lot of owners converted back to carbs as the FI system tended to spring leaks in the fuel hoses as they aged and being an air cooled engine and very hot you had a quick fire ball in the engine bay.
But they sure ran well compared to a beetle carb engine.
 

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My last vehicle with a carb was a 76 Dodge Aspen slant six. Like many carbs of the era, lots and lots and lot of vacuum hoses all under the hood in the name of emissions. My first FI vehicle was a 85 Dodge Lancer ES with port injection and turbo. My feeble memory is that carbs on most cars were phased out in the early to mid 80's followed by TBI in the mid to late 80s, followed by fuel injection into the early 90s. In general, truck engines lagged behind these upgrades because the truck emissions requirements were not as strict as the car emissions requirements.
 

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Here's a really funky setup:
In 1988 I moved my aunt cross-country in a 24-foot Penske rental truck. It had a 366 CID GM V-8 and 5-speed manual transmission, with TBI and manual choke; air brakes, but a hand parking brake. It had to be warmed up for a few minutes, or it would chug, regardless of the choke position. Never figured out why a TBI needed a manual choke.
 

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Here's a really funky setup:
In 1988 I moved my aunt cross-country in a 24-foot Penske rental truck. It had a 366 CID GM V-8 and 5-speed manual transmission, with TBI and manual choke; air brakes, but a hand parking brake. It had to be warmed up for a few minutes, or it would chug, regardless of the choke position. Never figured out why a TBI needed a manual choke.
Sounds like a Frankenstein engine set up lol.
 

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The feedback carburetor was a stopgap until EFI became cheaper and more reliable
More to the point. Chrysler engineers were trying to get them to switch to EFI in the 1970s. VW had it on their USA Rabbit in 1979 and it was absolutely reliable.
No electronic ignition, though! Weird. But at least it didn't have a choke!
 

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Except for the non-turbo Omni/Horizons and trucks, Chrysler passenger cars were all EFI by mid-1985.
The trucks became EFI (except for the 5.9L which had the Quadrajet) in 1987½ . The Omni/Horizon became EFI in 1988.
The Colts kept carburetors until 1990. By then, the carburetor had been so over-developed in order to pass emissions, that EFI was the way to go.
Almost immediately, almost all complaints about stalling, no-starts, backfires, poor fuel economy, hesitation and rough idle vanished.
IC, my 1985 LeBaron convertible had a 2.6L Mitsubishi with their FBC system (probably one of the worst I have ever seen), TBI would have been a welcome improvement.
 
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Except for the non-turbo Omni/Horizons and trucks, Chrysler passenger cars were all EFI by mid-1985.
The trucks became EFI (except for the 5.9L which had the Quadrajet) in 1987½ . The Omni/Horizon became EFI in 1988.
The Colts kept carburetors until 1990. By then, the carburetor had been so over-developed in order to pass emissions, that EFI was the way to go.
Almost immediately, almost all complaints about stalling, no-starts, backfires, poor fuel economy, hesitation and rough idle vanished.

Well, not the M-body. They went from the Carter BBD 2bbl and TQ to the Holley 6280 2bbl and Rochester E4ME Quadrajet beginning in 1985. They did have a TBI arrangement for the 1986 models, but that was put on hold, and later went in the trucks. The 1989 5th Ave, Diplomat, and Fury were the last Chrysler cars with carburetors.
 

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I seem to remember reading somewhere the last vehicle in production in the US with a carb was the 1991 Jeep Grand Wagoneer with the AMC 360 V8....
Could be, I think the last pickup was made by Isuzu, I don't recall the year but it was well after everything else had moved over. The only advantage of a carburetor on a stock car is price, and cost of ownership destroys that advantage with the first tune-up done by a mechanic; or, if you do it yourself, with a couple of years of extra gasoline.
 

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I seem to remember reading somewhere the last vehicle in production in the US with a carb was the 1991 Jeep Grand Wagoneer with the AMC 360 V8....
Several small pickups were produced after 1991 with carburetors. They were sold in the US, don’t know the county of manufacture.
 
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