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Well, picking up the ol' Grand Voyager from the tranny shop today, keeping fingers crossed that that wierd intermittent noise is gone as well.....Quickie question, which I can't seem to find an answer on Google......How much weight can you put in a '90 Grand Voyager with the 3.3 and 4 speed automatic? I put an aftermarket tranny cooler in it, size of which may have been slight over-kill.... Not talking about towing or anything like that, just need a number so I can gauge exactly how much crap I can throw in the back of that thing....Have to help a buddy move, and he has a garage full of car parts, wood stove, etc.....So naturally, yours truly with the "warehouse on wheels" is suddenly a popular guy....Thanks!
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Check the door sticker for the Gross Weight Rating - that's the max the vehicle and everything in it can weigh. The difference between the GVWR and the vehicle's actual weight is the payload.
 

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Having hauled loads in my 1991 Grand Voyager 3.3 and 1999 Town and Country 3.8 that were likely beyond the factory rating, I can tell you that the place you'll notice it first is the suspension. Once it starts to squat down, you should consider it a full load and allow extra braking space ahead on the road.
 

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Also consider that the GVWR is for a vehicle in very good condition. At 23 years of wear and tear, you may have to make concessions depending on unibody structural integrity, brake systems, tires, suspension and steering handling, etc.
You might want to have a technician's opinion of the overall health of the vehicle and if it would be advisable to carry heavy loads on public highways safely, even temporarily.
Keep any decision a responsible and safe one. Any unavoidable loss of vehicle control when heavily loaded at a bad moment could be regrettable.
 

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KOG
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1100-1209 lbs, which includes the weight of driver and any passengers, is in the ballpark for that model. A quick, crude estimate is to check for clearance between rear axle and bump stops. When it gets to about 1 inch it's time to proceed very slowly and cautiously to avoid bending or breaking suspension parts by bottoming the suspension. Make sure the tires are in good condition and fully inflated as well, and hold down the speed.
 

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And the first question about capacity starts with: Has this been a rust belt vehicle? If so, a good inspection of the suspension load areas for corrosion is a must! Then you can use the vehicle ratings if it passes the rust inspection.
 
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