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From Autoblog:


After years of rumored development, Stellantis has revealed its new six-cylinder engine family. The 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged "Hurricane" I6 will offer V8 power, forced induction torque and six-cylinder efficiency in a package designed to fit into any of the company's North American rear-wheel-drive platforms.

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What is "V8 power," exactly? Well, in standard output guise, the new I6 cranks out more than 400 horsepower (the specific figure will vary by application) and 450 pound-feet of torque, while the high-output variant is good for more than 500 horses and 475 lb-ft. The final figures will be dependent on the application. We'll save you a little legwork: In current Ram, Jeep and Dodge products, the 5.7-liter Hemi tops out at about 395 hp and 410 lb-ft, give or take, and the 6.4-liter around 485 hp and 475 lb-ft.

This is a clean-sheet design that is only related to the company's turbocharged four-cylinder by some common measurements. The I6 is exclusively direct-injection (no hybrid/port-injection here) and the two I6 variants share 96 common parts, including the block and oil pan design. The differences are found in their internals, intake plumbing, valvetrain components and the turbochargers themselves. Stellantis is not yet ready to share specs or supplier info for the turbos but says announcements will come from its partners soon.

The standard-output I6 has a compression ratio of 10.4:1 and revs to 5,800 rpm. It will run on regular fuel, albeit with reduced performance; 91 octane is recommended for maximum output. The high-output variant has a compression ratio of 9.4:1 and will rev to 6,100 rpm. That one will require premium.

The new I6's advantages go beyond basic power output. Every Hemi family engine currently in production is based on an iron block design, so they're heavy. The aluminum-block I6 shaves weight off the total engine package, even if some of that gets added back thanks to the turbos and their associated plumbing. The standard-output I6 weighs 430 pounds, Stellantis engineers told us; the high-output adds just another 11. Fully dressed 5.7-liter V8s are in the 550-560-pound ballpark, and 6.4-liters close in on 600 pounds.

You may be wondering, "Why a clean-sheet gasoline engine now, when the industry is moving toward battery-electrics?" A valid inquiry, and one Stellantis was prepared to address. While the company will be pivoting to electrification over the next decade, it won't be instantaneous. This engine family was engineered with electrification (hybrid or plug-in) in mind, however Stellantis wouldn't say when we'll see those hybrids. Think of this as a bridge between ICE and BEV.

In fact, the company's propulsion team stayed incredibly tight-lipped about what to expect in terms of applications. In practical terms, it will fit anywhere the 3.6L Pentastar V6 or Hemi fits, provided you're talking about RWD platforms. For those who want to do their own measuring, the standard output Hurricane measures 33.4 inches x 28.7 inches x 32.7 inches. The high-output checks in at 33.9" x 29.0" x 33.4".

That said, don't expect Stellantis to start chucking the 3.6-liter in favor of the 3.0TT in its mainstream cars. Just because it can fit doesn't mean Stellantis will do it; look how long it took us to get a Hemi in a Jeep Wrangler. And don't expect it to pop up in any Stellantis products built overseas, either. This engine family was designed primarily for North America; only American-built export models will be in the running for the time being.

We won't have to wait long to find out exactly where it will appear. Stellantis finally confirmed rumors that the engine has been in production since November and says the first products to utilize it will materialize within a matter of months, not years. We're supposed to see the first one — a Jeep, and the smart money is on the new long-wheelbase Wagoneer — at the New York International Auto Show in April.

 

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Wow, I thought this was going to obliterate both Hemis in power and torque? Turns out not so much. In H.O. form, the same torque and 15 hp for a reported 2k more. Not impressed.
We haven't seen HP and torque curves to compare.
Could be the T6 provides better grunt through the range. Or it could be like a lot of "more powerful" engines replacing an old design- the peak is higher but useable power off peak often is lower.
 

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Wow, I thought this was going to obliterate both Hemis in power and torque? Turns out not so much. In H.O. form, the same torque and 15 hp for a reported 2k more. Not impressed.
It does obliterate them because of the very wide torque range. It certainly obliterates the 5.7. It beats the 392 with a little more difficulty. I do wonder if it can come close to the 392's "instant-on" acceleration which is what makes it really unique. However... 15% better mileage is hard to argue with, too.
 

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Comparisons:
5.7 Hemi - 395 hp/410 lb-ft of torque
3.0 GME T6 SO - 400+ hp/450 lb.-ft of torque

6.4 Hemi - 485 hp/475 lb-ft of torque
3.0 GME T6 HO - 500+ hp/475 lb.-ft of torque

These are impressive numbers from an engine that is half the displacement and 125 lbs lighter. Kudos to all the engineers that worked on this new engine. I can't wait to read some reviews of the vehicles that deploy these engines. And I am curious to see what the EPA mileage numbers will be too.
 

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It does obliterate them because of the very wide torque range. It certainly obliterates the 5.7. It beats the 392 with a little more difficulty. I do wonder if it can come close to the 392's "instant-on" acceleration which is what makes it really unique. However... 15% better mileage is hard to argue with, too.
Better mileage is always subjective, due to driving habits. I'm sorry, I've never been a fan of this engine from the beginning, I believe it was a pipedream of the late chairman. Since new ICE powerplants won't be needed long term, it just seems like a tremendous waste of precious resources again. I will always wonder about the comments that were made years ago about V8s not fitting into the then new Alfa platform and this is their answer to that, now adapted to truck use.
 

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We haven't seen HP and torque curves to compare.
Could be the T6 provides better grunt through the range. Or it could be like a lot of "more powerful" engines replacing an old design- the peak is higher but useable power off peak often is lower.
It sounds like they are going to tune it both ways. 405 HP and torque biased 3.0T is just an upsizing of the 2.0T at 135 HP / L. 500 HP out of a 3.0T on premium only is very likely to be peaky and laggy without a whole lot of expensive gadgets added to the engine.
 

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The 3.0-liter Hurricane twin-turbo I-6 shares design features, including bore and stroke and cylinder spacing, with the globally produced turbocharged 2.0-liter I-4.

 

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Better mileage is always subjective, due to driving habits. I'm sorry, I've never been a fan of this engine from the beginning, I believe it was a pipedream of the late chairman. Since new ICE powerplants won't be needed long term, it just seems like a tremendous waste of precious resources again. I will always wonder about the comments that were made years ago about V8s not fitting into the then new Alfa platform and this is their answer to that, now adapted to truck use.
No - it's not. Better mileage is officially defined by the EPA cycle. It won't apply to all drivers but that's the definition.

Half of FCA US vehicles will be gasoline powered in 2030. They can't limp along on designs last updated ten years ago.

I don't know if this was done for Alfa, but I dobut it.

I would also say that if they drop all V8s from the Challenger and Charger, it would allow for a lot of weight reduction and either footprint reduction or larger interiors. Sure, they would lose the V8 rear wheel drive sedan/coupe market, such as it is, but with more power and less weight, they would have higher performance to make mincemeat of Accords and such, and to compete with the ever-burgeoning electric car market.

Look at an Ioniq 5 dual-motor ... range isn't great (260 miles or some such, I know that's not exactly right; sole-motor is 300 miles), but it's rear drive and comfortably large, very well outfitted, pricier than the base Chargers but in line with the higher-powered models. Now imagine that Ioniq 5 and its competitors in five years, and that's what the Hurricane will face up against.

Some people will want to use less fuel just to frustrate terrorists leading foreign countries, and foreign countries that support terrorists.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Better mileage is always subjective, due to driving habits. I'm sorry, I've never been a fan of this engine from the beginning, I believe it was a pipedream of the late chairman. Since new ICE powerplants won't be needed long term, it just seems like a tremendous waste of precious resources again. I will always wonder about the comments that were made years ago about V8s not fitting into the then new Alfa platform and this is their answer to that, now adapted to truck use.
That theory doesn't make much sense given the Grecale comes with a twin turbo V6 with 523hp and 457tq. Doesn't look like they were too concerned with fitting in an I6 at any point. For the Wagoneer and RAM it really doesn't seem too much different than offering the GME I4 and the 3.2l Pentastar alongside each other in the Cherokee, for example. This modern engine design is going to pay benefits in weight, attract customers with better fuel economy, and allow for more compact design in various cars that are planned with this motor. The better emissions is a nice added plus.
 

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That theory doesn't make much sense given the Grecale comes with a twin turbo V6 with 523hp and 457tq. Doesn't look like they were too concerned with fitting in an I6 at any point. For the Wagoneer and RAM it really doesn't seem too much different than offering the GME I4 and the 3.2l Pentastar alongside each other in the Cherokee, for example. This modern engine design is going to pay benefits in weight, attract customers with better fuel economy, and allow for more compact design in various cars that are planned with this motor. The better emissions is a nice added plus.
It only leads to more compact designs if they drop the V8.
 

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That theory doesn't make much sense given the Grecale comes with a twin turbo V6 with 523hp and 457tq. Doesn't look like they were too concerned with fitting in an I6 at any point. For the Wagoneer and RAM it really doesn't seem too much different than offering the GME I4 and the 3.2l Pentastar alongside each other in the Cherokee, for example. This modern engine design is going to pay benefits in weight, attract customers with better fuel economy, and allow for more compact design in various cars that are planned with this motor. The better emissions is a nice added plus.
It does when you factor in BMW.
 
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