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KOG
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One of the best ways to minimize tire issues is to use Michelin. They have much higher standards for both trueness and roundness than other manufacturers. With other brands I've fairly often gotten good tires, but not always.
 
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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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I find that tire preferences is a very subjective topic. Sure, Michelin has high-standards for quality, but are over-priced IMHO.
All tires have to meet FMVSS and are subject to recalls when warranted. There are some tire brands that I avoid.
Sometimes the smaller (underdog) tire companies will step up to satisfy you if there is a problem. They have a vested interest (survival) in your complete satisfaction.
I have had the larger, more arrogant manufacturers unwilling to make things right.
I still think that Ford had more lawyers than Firestone. :rolleyes:
 
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Virginia Gentleman
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Sure, Michelin has high-standards for quality, but are over-priced IMHO.
Indeed. Though I did get 111,000 miles out of the Michelins my 2006 Dodge Ram 1500 came with. To replace with the same Michelins was way out of my budget.

I've had several sets of tires from Firestone (Destination LE, Primewell (2 sets), Destination LE3) from Firestone and got reasonable wear out of them. Only issue was a piece of debris that punctured one tire - was repaired by a local tire shop.
I still think that Ford had more lawyers than Firestone. :rolleyes:
Ford was wrong. They recommended a much lower tire pressure than Firestone on the Explorers.
 

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Michelin was my go-to for over 25 years. I was getting great ride and handling, and even wear up to 100K miles.
Then in 2010 I bought two full sets of Michelin Harmony tires, and both developed severe sidewall cracks - regularly-spaced and -sized and shape splits all around, like a retread - parallel to the circumference, where the tread meets the sidewall, on all 8 tires. One set only had 20K miles on it. I haven't bought any from them since.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
According to all three mechanics, the tires are fine. However, I am guessing we've got shock issues - and those worn suspension joints which ARE noisy over bumps. It's going in on Monday for a full workup.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I find that tire preferences is a very subjective topic. Sure, Michelin has high-standards for quality, but are over-priced IMHO.
All tires have to meet FMVSS and are subject to recalls when warranted. There are some tire brands that I avoid.
Sometimes the smaller (underdog) tire companies will step up to satisfy you if there is a problem. They have a vested interest (survival) in your complete satisfaction.
I have had the larger, more arrogant manufacturers unwilling to make things right.
I still think that Ford had more lawyers than Firestone. :rolleyes:
I would like to know the ones you avoid.

We've had decent luck with Goodyear, Yokohama, General, and Bridgestone. The only truly bad tires I've ever had were entry level Coopers and Goodyears - the ones specified by the automaker in years when Chrysler only cared about cost.
 

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I would like to know the ones you avoid.

We've had decent luck with Goodyear, Yokohama, General, and Bridgestone. The only truly bad tires I've ever had were entry level Coopers and Goodyears - the ones specified by the automaker in years when Chrysler only cared about cost.
Totally agree with IC. One thing I ALWAYS avoid when choosing a tire is Consumer Reports. Michelin is a love/hate brand. In my experiences, I fall squarely into the hate category. My wife had back luck with a set constantly leaking air on an old Monte Carlo. Had the rims cleaned and tires resealed, and still leaked. Tires were only a couple years old and not many miles. Finally replaced them with a cheap set of A/S Firestones before winter because she was going to trade the car in the spring. 'Stones didn't leak a bit of air all winter. Had an OEM set on a new 1990 GC with only 1,500 miles on it. Left rear tire peeled apart as I was exiting tollway doing about 55. Had our dog in the back, and it was a cool 50 degree day, so wasn't underinflated, going excessive speeds, or tires got very hot. Local Michelin dealer said it was obviously a defect, but Michelin wouldn't stand behind replacement on an almost new tire. Took the other 3, plus full sized spare and sold them as almost new take-offs and bought a set of 5 BFGs. Covered about 3/4 cost of a new set.

Lastly, my '06 Daytona came with Michelins. They were just OK, for 1st couple years. As I drive all my vehicles in NO IL winters year-round, tires became worthless after that in rain or snow. I got 22K out of them. Even dry traction was iffy. So, my adventures with Michelin haven't been very positive on 3 very different types of vehicles.

I don't necessarily focus on a specific tire "brand" when choosing a replacement tire. I look at the size, then I go to web sites like Tire Rack and Discount Tire and compare ratings in that size, and look for the proper tire (load rating, speed rating, tread-wear, all-season) based on the vehicle it's going on, type of driving it'll see, and highest ratings in wet, snow and ice, as it'll be driven year-round. I look for reviews from similar vehicles, driven in similar climate as mine.

Our newer '21 Durango has the 20" Bridgestone Ecopia (ECRAPPIAs!). Very iffy reviews from just about everywhere. FOR NOW, they will probably be like the Michelins I had on my Daytona - just get me through a couple winters before wet/snow traction goes away, and I have to search for a 265/50r20 replacement. As of today, I'd choose a set of Pirelli Scorpion AS Plus 3s, but that could change in a year or 2 if I need to dump these.
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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I avoid Goodyear, Pirelli and Dunlop because of personally bad experiences with them.
I have had good luck with Kelly (Springfield), Mastercraft & Futuras.
The Mastercraft & Futuras were inexpensive, but served well.
Coopers were OK with me.
Everybody will have different experiences with different tire brands. Even Consumer Reports evaluations were 'subjective'.
 

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Dunlops were OEM on my wife's 97 Camry and were bald at 30k miles.
Mastercraft were cheap but OK, I got about 60K miles from them.
Goodyear gave a good ride, slightly squishy, but not great handling.
We run General Altimax RT-43 on both our Chrysler 200 cars, they are fine.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thanks, ImperialCrown. I never even considered Kelly, Mastercraft, or Futura. Cooper has a good rep.
I found with Goodyear that the variation between brands, and even between sizes, was astonishing - even when price differences were minimal.
I've used the General Altimax and liked them along with Yoko Avid MD-H4 and a few others I forget the name of.

FWIW, to summarize the balance issues:
1) Mavis to fix small wobble up front. Car became undriveable at over 40 mph. Returned to shop. They retried all four wheels and shop foreman said he did it himself and it was perfect. Car remained undriveable.
2) Took to small shop with smart, enthusiastic techs. Much better but still felt like my fillings were being shaken out most of the time over 50 mph. They tried again and checked the suspension. "Can't find anything wrong."
3) Took to Teterboro dealership. Tech test drove and immediately said, "There's something loose in the suspension, but that's relatively minor, and the wheels are unbalanced." The machine there showed each wheel off by at least 1.5 grams (no idea if that's a big amount). He mentioned that the wheels were filthy on the inside—he always cleans them before balancing to eliminate any transitory problems.
Result: far better, but nowhere near what it should be. Driveable on the 950 mile trip but tiring with shaking steering wheel.

So yes, I'm guessing those joints are the issue, and it's going back to the same tech to find what's wobbling.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Update: they asked if they could take it apart, and I said yes. They found a defective (leaking) strut and a bad bushing / something-or-other link (I remembered yesterday but today it's gone). Chrysler is honoring the service contract. There's a financial relief!
 
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