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For those who cry for different materials, don’t think for a moment that anything is impervious to salt. It’s like driving in battery acid.

Actually, that is not true, as Salt (road salt, or halite—sodium chloride containing mineral impurities) is chemically neutral. It is neither basic, nor acidic. As you illustrate, it is however able to react powerfully with a variety of substances, including those used to make Mopars.

From the perspective of Joe Average, however, your point is well made.

(Just channeling Mr. Bob Sheaves.)
 

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If you want high margins, you should be willing to spend a little more for properly treated parts so it doesn’t look like this right away. Yes, it drives up cost a little, but it also boosts brand image. It doesn’t mean the car would cost $700k.
 

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Actually, that is not true, as Salt (road salt, or halite—sodium chloride containing mineral impurities) is chemically neutral. It is neither basic, nor acidic. As you illustrate, it is however able to react powerfully with a variety of substances, including those used to make Mopars.

From the perspective of Joe Average, however, your point is well made.

(Just channeling Mr. Bob Sheaves.)
That, sir, is why I used the qualifier “it’s like”.
(Insert some kind of emoji)
All arguments aside, every man made material does its best to return to its natural state, and cars dissolve round here
 

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And my 92 Dakota had a 30 inch section of frame rail rusted so badly that when I jacked it with a hydraulic jack, the frame rail collapsed without the truck elevating. Had to have it cut out and a new section fabbed.
Chrysler DEFINITELY has had issues with frame rust. My 93 Daytona also had a fully rotted rear crossmember. In fact, the inner and outer body yielded so that the gas cap door would not open fully, was misaligned. That was the end of it.
Wow. Seeing all those pictures makes me sick and feel very bad for you. I *HATE* rust. I know so folks don't have a choice but to drive on it. It just seems such a shame to drive such nice vehicles only so see them literally disappear before your eyes. Just makes me sick. Wish there was something that could be done. Call me crazy, but I once spent many hours cleaning a frame to the bare metal and had it submersed in a galvanizing tank. It got chemically stripped again then galvanized inside and out.
 

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After this video, many Will stay out from buying any Mopar, se most thank God foto that, se dont need them at all.
They should also look at what they think Is a better product, they will have a nice surprise.
Have a very good Moparweek!
 
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A lot of people (sports car buyers fit this bill, I think) are probably only keeping these cars for 2-4 years. I'm not sure a little surface rust is really anything they're concerned about.

People outraged by this should google "Toyota Tundra Frame Rust". Their heads would explode.
 
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I'm always mystified by "new" vehicles with rust issues. We keep our vehicles for roughly 6-8 years (so ~10 years old if bought used) and have never had a rust issue driving in Maine and now, Michigan winters. I don't wax our cars regularly (or ever on my fleet truck) and only run them through the car wash 1-2 times during the winter, probably only 6-8 times a year.
 

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I'm always mystified by "new" vehicles with rust issues. We keep our vehicles for roughly 6-8 years (so ~10 years old if bought used) and have never had a rust issue driving in Maine and now, Michigan winters. I don't wax our cars regularly (or ever on my fleet truck) and only run them through the car wash 1-2 times during the winter, probably only 6-8 times a year.
Come to Ontario. There is many a 4th gen Ram with rockers completely rotted as well as bedsides above the wheel well.
 

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Come to Ontario. There is many a 4th gen Ram with rockers completely rotted as well as bedsides above the wheel well.
I see rolling tetanus shots here as well, but the age of vehicle is decidedly a factor, plus if you are in an area that has inspection laws. The last vehicle we had that had rust forming along the rocker panel was my wife's 1996(?) Blazer in 2004. What a POS that was, but it was hardly new when we finally ditched it.
 

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Don't like rust on metal, figure out how to negatively charge the metal. Lots of people wasting a lot of energy complaining about a natural process when they could be working on how to setup a car to have a metal structure with a negative charge.

BTW - Rock salt on roads is a better alternative than brine (CaCl2 or MgCl2) that crystalizes when it dries on the road and becomes airborne. In that state is gets into all areas on a vehicle. Washing your cash does no good as brine reactivates when wet going back to crystal state when it dries. Its a vicious cycle and does damage all year long.

Where I live brine gets applied to the road (especially bridges) when the temps gets below 40 degrees. This means its applied from Oct to almost May. The resulting damage is obvious to ground vegetation, bridges, road surfaces, and 5 year old cars which look like Swiss cheese.

Beet Juice is an alternative as it will not harm the enviroment or infastructure. It costs 2-3x's more than brine (which is pennies a gallon) preventing its wide spread use. The long term damage cost is never a factor when municipalities and states only look at the world one fiscal year at a time.
 

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Part in red: how?
Suggestion: Plate or use product that will seal the part's raw exposed areas as best as possible. Putting forth SOME sort of effort rather that just installing non coated/plated parts, to me, would indicate more care for the product and help avoid any possibly consumer disappointment. I've read a lot of posts on here. And, let me stop and say this is NOT directed at you or anyone in particular, but just to make it crystal clear to everyone, I am a Mopar fan. PERIOD. I'm not going to list every single Mopar I've owned and which ones seemed better than others. The whole point here is to merely offer suggestions to improve the products. But if anyone wants a number, I've owned no less than ten Mopars since 2010. I'm not running the company down nor any vehicle down. Am merely offering that I care and want the company to succeed. Also, I think it wise to put forth extra effort when offering vehicles that represent the brand such as Hellcats, Redeyes, Demons, upper echelon Jeeps and the like to go to the extra effort to not just make the top and side shiny but to demonstrate and separate yourself from the rest and plate/coat certain exposed parts under these special cars/vehicles. I too am NOT fond when someone dumps on the company. I like to offer suggestions and *constructive* criticism at times. Plating parts is not THAT expensive. The "L" platform has been around and I'd think the platform has well paid for itself. No company is perfect, never will be so there's always room for improvement. Plain and simple, I care.
 

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BTW - Rock salt on roads is a better alternative than brine (CaCl2 or MgCl2) that crystalizes when it dries on the road and becomes airborne. In that state is gets into all areas on a vehicle. Washing your cash does no good as brine reactivates when wet going back to crystal state when it dries. Its a vicious cycle and does damage all year long.

Where I live brine gets applied to the road (especially bridges) when the temps gets below 40 degrees. This means its applied from Oct to almost May. The resulting damage is obvious to ground vegetation, bridges, road surfaces, and 5 year old cars which look like Swiss cheese.
Exactly. Here in MA, they spray liquid salt, it dries to a fine powder on the roads, flies up as dust and gets in every crevice of every car. It also attacks roadside vegetation and bridges.

My theory for why one side of the bridge looks worse than the other is that the air drafted by the spreading vehicle and cars behind it sends it airborne into the oncoming girder and the underside, and as the spreader comes out the other side, the bridge breaks the draft, so it doesn't attack the far side.

Northbound
Maple St bridge NB.JPG


Southbound, same bridge
Maple St bridge SB.JPG
 
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fter seeing what a few year old Dodge (Ram) truck looks like in Pennsylvania
Suggestion: Plate or use product that will seal the part's raw exposed areas as best as possible. Putting forth SOME sort of effort rather that just installing non coated/plated parts, to me, would indicate more care for the product and help avoid any possibly consumer disappointment. I've read a lot of posts on here. And, let me stop and say this is NOT directed at you or anyone in particular, but just to make it crystal clear to everyone, I am a Mopar fan. PERIOD. I'm not going to list every single Mopar I've owned and which ones seemed better than others. The whole point here is to merely offer suggestions to improve the products. But if anyone wants a number, I've owned no less than ten Mopars since 2010. I'm not running the company down nor any vehicle down. Am merely offering that I care and want the company to succeed. Also, I think it wise to put forth extra effort when offering vehicles that represent the brand such as Hellcats, Redeyes, Demons, upper echelon Jeeps and the like to go to the extra effort to not just make the top and side shiny but to demonstrate and separate yourself from the rest and plate/coat certain exposed parts under these special cars/vehicles. I too am NOT fond when someone dumps on the company. I like to offer suggestions and *constructive* criticism at times. Plating parts is not THAT expensive. The "L" platform has been around and I'd think the platform has well paid for itself. No company is perfect, never will be so there's always room for improvement. Plain and simple, I care.
Well said.
 
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I'd like to see the actual sales numbers on that... I've only ever seen a handful of V-6 Challengers on the road, but I see the V-8 models all the time.
I don't know about other places but here on the atlantic east coast of canada there are lots of v6 challengers running around in face there are 2 white base challengers in the small villiage I live in! but in fredericton newbrunswick one dealer told me they didn't sell any 300's chargers, challengers, in 2020, only jeeps and rams, no fiat dealers here at all you have to go to st john NB to find one, my dealer can't do any warrenty service on a fiat as he doesn't have a separate show room to sell them they have to go a 100 miles away to the fiat dealer ,
 

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Imagine spending near $100,000 on a car to have people tell you surface rust from factory is ok and you should grab a $12 spray can and fix it yourself.

If it's so simple and not an issue why doesn't FCA direct dealers to wire wheel and spray before handing the cars over to the customer?

You guys can't tell me it would increase the cost by thousands if you already said it's 5 minutes and a $12 can. Are we paying thousands per hour now?

Better off just not buying an FCA car....
 

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My 09 has less rust on suspension bolts than this. Granted, it mostly avoids any bad weather, and except for the photo on snow here when I first bought it and drove to my sister's house on a farm, never sees winter weather and road salt. That said, it looks worse than it probably is, mechanically. My Jeep takes the road salt abuse. My car's AR Torq Thrusts, OTOH, are pitted, presumably from being driven on brined roads that had dried, which I find out now produces salt dust, and then sweating or picking up atmospheric moisture.
 
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