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Yes, certain states will follow. The mandate will be very relevant if some states are unwilling to upgrade their grid, especially ones that have continued rolling brown outs and tell people to not charge their EV's. Cough Cough California.
You may want to brush up on your California knowledge before you falsely make claims. In summer 2020, there were extremely brief rolling blackouts for a small percentage of citizens that lasted a very short period of time. It was the first time in a couple decades.

Just this past couple of weeks we had record heat and all time high for daily grid demand. No blackouts.
 

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You may want to brush up on your California knowledge before you falsely make claims. In summer 2020, there were extremely brief rolling blackouts for a small percentage of citizens that lasted a very short period of time. It was the first time in a couple decades.

Just this past couple of weeks we had record heat and all time high for daily grid demand. No blackouts.
I been "brushed up" with the facts. But I'll add in the context:

So I guess you think under 1 million people losing power is a not an issue? Or businesses that lose power for 2 hours?

The fact they have to tell people to lower their energy consumption is an indicator that they don't have things under control. Especially when they want to switch to EV's and then tell them NOT to charge them. Sounds rather counter intuitive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I been "brushed up" with the facts. But I'll add in the context:

So I guess you think under 1 million people losing power is a not an issue? Or businesses that lose power for 2 hours?

The fact they have to tell people to lower their energy consumption is an indicator that they don't have things under control. Especially when they want to switch to EV's and then tell them NOT to charge them. Sounds rather counter intuitive.
California has had this issue for more than a decade. Besides, should not get into the grid or politics here.

The Recon may sell, but it all depends on price.....and I have zero faith that Jeep leadership wants a value-oriented offering.
 

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Most people who aren't quoting talking points, blame Enron for starting California's woes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·

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I been "brushed up" with the facts. But I'll add in the context:

So I guess you think under 1 million people losing power is a not an issue? Or businesses that lose power for 2 hours?

The fact they have to tell people to lower their energy consumption is an indicator that they don't have things under control. Especially when they want to switch to EV's and then tell them NOT to charge them. Sounds rather counter intuitive.
So one event, in 20 years, that lasted for less than 2 hours (for some just a few minutes) for less then 2% of the population, now means things are out of control in CA? Let's talk actual facts, and have them related to an EV discussion

1) we just had record heat waves that shattered anything that happened in 2020, both in terms of heat, longevity, and electricity demand. Zero rolling blackouts initiated by CA ISO.
2) CA has invested a lot over the years, including the last two years, to avoid what happened in 2020 (which was labeled as an extreme, non-normal event).
3) CA gets a large percentage of our electricity from cleaner, renewables and has a sophisticated system to understand demand and supply in order to make sure it purchases enough electricity to fill the gap. I know this, because my business' software is intimately involved with powering the entire data behind this demand forecast.
4) High demand usage comes between 4pm-9pm. Any sort or rolling blackout would occur here.
5) EV and/or solar/battery owners (of which I am one) are usually on rate plans that encourage charging EVs or filling of home batteries between the hours of Midnight to 3pm, and not charging EVs (and draining batteries to power the home) between 3pm-Midnight.
6) Many EV owners are already conditioned to charge their cars outside the 3pm-midnight range, especially the critical 4-9pm range.
7) There are relatively few drivers of ANY vehicle, that with a fully charged battery or gas tank at 3pm, would NEED to charge or fill that tank over the next 6 hours. The only use case would likely be someone who happened to be driving straight through that entire 6 hour block (which is very rare indeed).

You are taking a non-issue, and creating what you perceive to be an issue, in order to drive a fake narrative that either CA is out of control, or that further adoption of EVs will result in the state not allowing people to charge their car.
 

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California has had this issue for more than a decade. Besides, should not get into the grid or politics here.

The Recon may sell, but it all depends on price.....and I have zero faith that Jeep leadership wants a value-oriented offering.
And, no, we have not had an issue for more than a decade here, concerning rolling blackouts. It is literally a non event. See my other post.

And grid talk is relevant for an EV discussion (not politics of course).
 

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It reminds me of the "NYC is full of crime" narrative. NYC crime rates are actually still pretty good historically, and the subways are, per capita, safer than the above-ground. I lived in NYC for five years and worked there for around five to ten years. It's a lot safer than it was when I first moved in. I largely credit Bill Bratton and Mike Bloomberg. Corruption in NYC officials was allegedly rampant and quite open except under Bloomberg.

But it serves some politicians' and pundits' purposes to claim CA and NYC are horrors so they do it. Still a false narrative. Everyplace has its problems but I'd rather live in NYC than Minneapolis, New Orleans, Miami, or Detroit.
 

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It reminds me of the "NYC is full of crime" narrative. NYC crime rates are actually still pretty good historically, and the subways are, per capita, safer than the above-ground. I lived in NYC for five years and worked there for around five to ten years. It's a lot safer than it was when I first moved in. I largely credit Bill Bratton and Mike Bloomberg. Corruption in NYC officials was allegedly rampant and quite open except under Bloomberg.

But it serves some politicians' and pundits' purposes to claim CA and NYC are horrors so they do it. Still a false narrative. Everyplace has its problems but I'd rather live in NYC than Minneapolis, New Orleans, Miami, or Detroit.
NYC has plenty of crime and so does south Cali. Has it gone down(NYC)? Yes. But saying you get murdered or robbed less isn't something that warms the cockles of my heart. The crime, especially murders, is starting to rise again though. Giuliani also helped a lot and to a lesser extent Dinkins.
 

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NYC has plenty of crime and so does south Cali. Has it gone down(NYC)? Yes. But saying you get murdered or robbed less isn't something that warms the cockles of my heart. The crime, especially murders, is starting to rise again though. Giuliani also helped a lot and to a lesser extent Dinkins.
Dinkins? Nope. Giuliani either. As mayor he did one thing to stop crime, bringing in Bill Bratton. After that he got a huge head and stopped caring. Dinkins was always useless. I say that as one who did vote for Giuliani. I was out when the Dinkins election took place, lucky for me because I might have voted for him...

NYC is a lot safer than a lot of other places and much much safer than its historical norm. Like very city, it went through a long crime reduction trend and then, with COVID, crime came back, but nowhere near its old levels.

NYC is pretty safe for typical people on typical days. But with what, eight million? people, it's gonna have incidents every day. People don't seem to get that as you have larger populations, you get more crime overall, and there's a definite political reason to demonize certain places.

Side note -> https://www.bestplaces.net/crime/?city1=53651000&city2=51245000

Violent crime: NYC 28, Miami 49, USA total 23
Property crime: NYC 25, Miami 63, USA total 35

So in violent crime, NYC is a little worse than the country as a whole (2022 so far).
It's a lot safer in property crime.
Miami is poor in both.


Violent crime: NYC 28, Atlanta 55
Property crime: NYC 25, Atlanta 75

Oddly enough you don't hear constant references to how dangerous Atlanta is, but dang.
 

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Dinkins? Nope. Giuliani either. As mayor he did one thing to stop crime, bringing in Bill Bratton. After that he got a huge head and stopped caring. Dinkins was always useless. I say that as one who did vote for Giuliani. I was out when the Dinkins election took place, lucky for me because I might have voted for him...

NYC is a lot safer than a lot of other places and much much safer than its historical norm. Like very city, it went through a long crime reduction trend and then, with COVID, crime came back, but nowhere near its old levels.

NYC is pretty safe for typical people on typical days. But with what, eight million? people, it's gonna have incidents every day. People don't seem to get that as you have larger populations, you get more crime overall, and there's a definite political reason to demonize certain places.

Side note -> https://www.bestplaces.net/crime/?city1=53651000&city2=51245000

Violent crime: NYC 28, Miami 49, USA total 23
Property crime: NYC 25, Miami 63, USA total 35

So in violent crime, NYC is a little worse than the country as a whole (2022 so far).
It's a lot safer in property crime.
Miami is poor in both.


Violent crime: NYC 28, Atlanta 55
Property crime: NYC 25, Atlanta 75

Oddly enough you don't hear constant references to how dangerous Atlanta is, but dang.
Oh, I know exactly how bad Atlanta is. I just avoid the actual city, stick to various suburbs. The news is shooting after shooting interrupted by an occasional stabbing.
 

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Dinkins? Nope. Giuliani either. As mayor he did one thing to stop crime, bringing in Bill Bratton. After that he got a huge head and stopped caring. Dinkins was always useless. I say that as one who did vote for Giuliani. I was out when the Dinkins election took place, lucky for me because I might have voted for him...

NYC is a lot safer than a lot of other places and much much safer than its historical norm. Like very city, it went through a long crime reduction trend and then, with COVID, crime came back, but nowhere near its old levels.

NYC is pretty safe for typical people on typical days. But with what, eight million? people, it's gonna have incidents every day. People don't seem to get that as you have larger populations, you get more crime overall, and there's a definite political reason to demonize certain places.

Side note -> https://www.bestplaces.net/crime/?city1=53651000&city2=51245000

Violent crime: NYC 28, Miami 49, USA total 23
Property crime: NYC 25, Miami 63, USA total 35

So in violent crime, NYC is a little worse than the country as a whole (2022 so far).
It's a lot safer in property crime.
Miami is poor in both.


Violent crime: NYC 28, Atlanta 55
Property crime: NYC 25, Atlanta 75

Oddly enough you don't hear constant references to how dangerous Atlanta is, but dang.
They each did help regardless of capacity. No sense in ignoring that.

Nobody talks about Atlanta because it doesn't have the same gravitas or population size like NYC. Atlanta's crime is horrid, look at who runs it and the policies they enforce. Speaking of other cities my Aunt moved away from St. Louis because the crime rate was so high.
 

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As cities go, NYC is actually pretty good.

Dinkins... all I can say is he definitely didn't help with crime. Guiliani wasn't bad in his first term but the second was a self-dealing disaster. Speaking as one who was there, not one who only knew what was reported on a national level. You know why the emergency response team was in the WTC to begin with? Because Giuliani overrode their decision to be in Brooklyn (made because WTC was always a target). Why didn't the emergency workers have compatible radios? Because Giuliani overrode their budget request. “Leadership” that day consisted of words, not actions.

Anyway... the numbers don’t lie. NYC is not a cesspool of crime. It was, but it’s not now.

PS> One more: Dallas vs NYC.
Violent crime: Dallas 37, NYC 28
Property crime: Dallas, 51, NYC 25
 
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