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TFL reviews the 2020 Camry and Avalon TRD versions.

Contrary to past TRD practice where it involved a few cosmetic bits, these new TRDs will include a surprising number of appearance and performance goodies over the mainstream versions.

 

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Toyota has a RAV4 plug-in hybrid in testing. They are not sitting on their laurels.
 

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TFL... the second most bias source for auto opinion.

As for the "sportier" Camry, it's an interesting drive. They stiffened it up and it does feel sportier than previous Camry's for sure. I can attest to that. But it's got nothing on a Chrysler 200S or even a Charger. Throw in AWD to that 200S and it will pull away so fast it isn't even funny.

But to Toyota's credit, this is their sportiest Camry in decades! I haven't driven the sporty Avalon yet, but plan too. So I can't say anything on that. Look forward to driving the TRD trim in both of these myself. :)
 

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Getting serious means rear wheel drive. Front wheel drive relegates them to the not serious category. In a performance car it is a waste. Understeer, numb steering and lousy engine accessibility. I've had enough of those to never want another.
 
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kinda like selling a Chevrolet NOVA in Latin America lol.
 

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TFL... the second most bias source for auto opinion.
Biased indeed. Every video I’ve seen seems to praise a Jeep or a Ram pickup.
 

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Is it a requirement that these come with "TRD" emblem on the car? Very unfortunate acronym for the US.
Yup. Toyota even embroiders headrests with it!

I’m still not sure if refers to the vehicle...or the person sitting there...
 

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TFL... the second most bias source for auto opinion.

As for the "sportier" Camry, it's an interesting drive. They stiffened it up and it does feel sportier than previous Camry's for sure. I can attest to that. But it's got nothing on a Chrysler 200S or even a Charger. Throw in AWD to that 200S and it will pull away so fast it isn't even funny.

But to Toyota's credit, this is their sportiest Camry in decades! I haven't driven the sporty Avalon yet, but plan too. So I can't say anything on that. Look forward to driving the TRD trim in both of these myself. :)
You're sleeping quite a bit on the camry v6. Those things are just as quick if not quicker then the 200s along with it's awd
 

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dull dull nothing but understeer. Young'uns who never learned on a proper V8 rear drive don't know how a proper car should handle. Sorry for their loss.
 
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I’ll have to disagree. You use up all your traction to turn and add power and what happens? You understeer more and slide off the road. FWD is used for 2 reasons:
Saving space/weight
Reduce costs
Having nearly 60% of weight at one end, and all the power and steering at that end is not the ultimate in handling.

BMW and M-Benz do not use FWD. guess why?
 
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I’ll have to disagree. You use up all your traction to turn and add power and what happens? You understeer more and slide off the road. FWD is used for 2 reasons:
Saving space/weight
Reduce costs
Having nearly 60% of weight at one end, and all the power and steering at that end is not the ultimate in handling.

BMW and M-Benz do not use FWD. guess why?
If you are using up your car anywhere near that much on a public road you need to dial it back a lot. FWD as a whole is safer fro every day driving because it is predictable unlike rwd for most people. Why do you think you see so many mustang videos of a driver veering off the road? Its because they can't control a rwd vehicle. Also both bmw and mercedes have fwd model(s)
 

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FWD is not safer. Explain to me why the auto companies best known for safety, high performance handling use RWD?
BMW
MBenz
Jaguar
Aston Martin
Ferrari
Lamborghini

Front drive saves space and weight and makes certain sub assemblies faster on the assembly line.
If it were safer explain why the company best known for safety innovation in the world, MBenz, does not use it? You can’t because it isn’t safer.
The Mustang example is dumb [I should have my mouth washed out with soap for using such terms] kid drivers.
I learned on RWD and tried FWD and in the end do not like it. It compromises steering in high horsepower applications and does not allow the driver to adjust the attitude of the vehicle with the throttle.
To say nothing of the service headaches it creates. Rear bank of spark plugs buried on V6s. Timing belt housings jammed against the sub frame. I could go on but any serious driver who has driven both will prefer RWD.
FWD is for amateurs who see the car as an appliance. Just ask the engineers at BMW or MBenz if you don’t believe me.

So no, Toyota is not serious till you step up to the top Lexus models and guess what drive system they use? Hint: NOT FWD!

And just which models of MBenz and BMW here in the US use FWD?
And also, why did Toyota make such a big deal about naming the former Scion rear drive sports car the 86?
Because that was their internal code number for the last RWD Corolla that Japanese enthusiasts still revere!
 
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Sorry, I'm laughing at some of the above.
I learned to drive on RWD, and have driven FWD cars for 34 years now, and over 650K miles out of about 870K miles of driving. Snow, ice and rain are the norm where I live.
FWD is safer for public roads, because the car tends NOT to fishtail and spin out of control. In the few times that I have lost traction on a turn, the front pivoted instead of the rear wheels, keeping me exactly in line for the lane I was targeting.
The only times I've gone off the road were with RWD, and the only way I could get traction was to drive in reverse. The only way I could climb a slippery hill where I lived was to back up it in my RWD car for a block, til I could turn down a side street.
If you are drawing that much hp that FWD is unmanageable for you, you should not be on a public road.
 

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.

I've been seeing both the newer Camrys, along with previous Gen Camrys dressed in performance after-market pieces, on the roadways round about where I work. These dressed-up Camrys I've been noticing more and more over the last four to five years.

Many of those who have transformed their rides have done quite a good job of masking the family sedan, and have pumped up the road-racer image ( and a few others have done a pretty fair job of turning them into their own Urban Stealth ride ).

Never before thought of the Camry in those terms, but the majority have created a convincing finished product - down to a passable V6 growl ( or growl-ette for those who only like their V8 exhaust note ).

.
 
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