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This mod sounds like a great idea. I'll modify mine asap as I've already replaced the computer once because of those codes and I'm sure it failed from the under hood heat. I've already baked several sets of windshield washer nozzles to a crisp ( literally ! ) Following the same process would it make sense to make the same mod directly above the computer ?
I got two reman computers from a place in Florida (this was about two years ago) and they were worse than my original which was throwing the codes. I ended up having a brand new computer installed at the dealer and having them flash it. Haven't had a problem since. Odd thing though, even though the bad computer was throwing the codes the car still ran perfectly. So what do you think about opening up another section of that seal area ?
 

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This is all based on the assumption that the computer is at fault and that a failure is heat-related, and that that heat is delivered from the engine compartment. Too many assumptions and not enough proper diagnostic work.
I'd say it's a fairly safe bet that it's the under hood heat on these turbo cars that's causing these computer issues.
Various "false" 0032,0035 codes being set seem to be the norm yet there's no degradation whatsoever of the performance of the engine. It get's super hot back there including the PCM which is only a few inches away from the turbo housing. These failures seem to occur when the mileage gets in the 100K range.
The crystalization of the washer nozzles is another indicator of high heat. I'm on my third set of nozzles. These things snap like dry pasta !
Just thinking that maybe simply removing the entire rear piece of engine compartment weatherstrip would also promote airflow out of the engine compartment.
 

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The location of the PCM in the PT Cruiser is positioned in such a way that it's a heat sink for the turbo. No way it gets any ventilation in that location. There's so little room in the PT engine compartment. They should have mounted it behind the grille ! Oh, and have used metal washer nozzles !
 

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It's too bad these cars are worth so little now. Between the difficulty and expense of replacing the timing belt and the related components as well as the failure rate and the cost of the PCMs it doesn't make economic sense for the average owner to fix these terrific little cars. The recommended timing belt change interval of 102K miles and the cost involved in changing it dooms these cars to simply be driven until they stop.
Unless you're a competent DIY person where you have the ability and patience to fix it yourself, having a good shop do a timing belt job at 102K is just not worth it.
It seems that as you pass around 120K miles all sorts of repairs will be imminent if they haven't been done already. Timing belt, water pump, motor mounts, suspension components, radiator, PCM on turbos, etc. simply add up to make expensive repairs like a timing belt change at 102K a bad idea as there will be additional repair expenses lurking not all that far down the road. Too many systems and components that won't make it to 200K miles.

Now if there was a kit to convert a PT to an electric car that would be the ticket !
 

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It's funny, at least on my PT GT, the original PCM "failure" appeared to only be the fact that the CEL was lit and there were false codes being set. The car ran perfectly, but would not pass state inspection with the CEL lit. A lot of time and expense replacing O2 sensors and such that weren't bad only to find that the PCM was at fault.
 

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I'm sure the under hood heat is responsible for the PCM Failure. Since the false codes being set are rather commonplace it would indicate to me that a certain component or group of components within the PCM are the most vulnerable. No surprise though that other related problems pop up as well. The two remanufactured PCMs I had received not only had the usual bad codes but had other problems as well. They were unusable.

The PCM should have been located way up front ahead of the radiator and the car should have been made with a timing chain and a long life water pump !
 

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The Ace mechanic on YouTube, Motor City Garage has done a number of excellent videos on various services on the PT as well as other Mopar vehicles. He has a great deal of insight.
 
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