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I noticed the other day when adding oil to my 2005 300C that there was moisture under the filler cap. I also noticed moisture on the oil dip stick. I ask the service tech. at the dealership about this and was told the this was common on the Hemi engines. Is this true and what can be done to stop it? I'm using Mobile 1synthetic oil. And no it's not engine coolent. Is there anything to add to the oil to get rid of this moisture?
 

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Common especially in the cold winter months with condensing water inside the engine. For every 8 gallons of gasoline burned, a gallon of water is produced. Most goes out the tail pipes. A small amount will mix with oil and become a 'mayonnaise'.
This is aggravated by short trips where the condensate doesn't have a chance to burn off. You might consider more frequent oil changes in colder weather.
 

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I had a Reliant that got a lot of really short trips to work, like 1.5 miles each way. I tried to check the oil one winter day, and so much condensation had developed that the dipstick was frozen in the tube. I decided then that I had better take it out for a long drive every couple weeks at least.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No, all my trips are 30 miles one way,60 miles a day roun trip, 5 days a week. So the engine gets hot enough to get rid of the condensation, I would think.
 

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Then you should check the PCV valve for proper operation.
 

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That was my first thought. But I just had the PVE changed last year, but that's not to say that it isn't working the way it should. Changing the oil this Friday, and I think I'll check the PVC too. Was also thinking of adding a small amout of Marvel Mystery Oil to the oil. But I'm not sure on this one. Not sure how good of an idea this is. I've used it in the gas tank with good resualts.
 

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You should only need a good grade of 5w-20 that meets Chrysler's MS and API spec noted in your owner's manual. You shouldn't need additives.
An OEM (Chrysler) PCV valve is the best choice. Some aftermarket PCVs can vary in vacuum calibration and cause problems.
Some moisture in the crankcase this time of year is not uncommon and is mostly harmless to the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the help. Have only used Mobile 1 Synthetic 5W20 oil in this car from the start. I don't think I can get any better. I've have never used additives to this point, except the gas.
Thanks again.
 

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Wow. Thanks for the info. I was contemplating changing the oil in my wife's 200 myself, and would have used Mobil 1 synthetic 5W-20, apparently in violation of the warranty.
We have a contract with the dealer to do 3 more oil changes pre-paid, then I'll evaluate what to do.
 

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That's really strange. I know that Mobil One is considered by many to be the best brand out there, and I know that the Shelby cars recommended only Mobil One. From their website, it sounds like Mobil is trying to get their oil approved, but it's strange to me that it wasn't right off the bat.
 

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A revision to the Chrysler spec probably meant that Mobil had to redo testing to measure one or more parameters on which they had no data. Not strange if you live in the engineering world. Very likely they'll meet the spec once they have the requisite proof.
 

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That's very strange. I've been useing Mobil 1 for over 20 years now, in all my Chryslers (Mopars are all I've ever owned) and have never had any problems with it. I've asked different Chrysler service tech's at different dealerships and they have all said the same, that Mobil 1 is just fine to use. The first car In used it in was a '92 Le Baron with a 3.0 V-6 that was two years old when I bought it. The first thing that I noticed was the the engine started running a lot quieter and smoother. Had over 150,000 miles on it when I traded it in, and it was still running strong.
Bought a 98 Dodge Dakota two years ago. First oil change I put Mobil 1 in it. This truck has 100,000 miles on it. One of the very first things that i noticed was that the gas mileage went up. Not a real big increase but still an increase. Truck is running a lot smoother also.
My brother has replace all the lubricants in his Dodge with Mobil 1 lubricantes, oil, transmission and rearend. He's had nothing but good results. He's had this car for ten years.
So I don't think I'm going to stop using Mobil 1 anytime soon. The one thing that I love about Mobil 1 (all synthetics) is that when the engine is cold, winters here in northwestern Ohio, the oil starts to flow as soon as the engine starts. It's not effected by the cold the way regular motor oil is. I'll continue to use it.
 

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Not saying that you would ever have problems with using Mobil 1. It just isn't recommended because it hasn't received the OK from Chrysler until a required 2-year test trial is passed and complete. It would be a long-shot to invoke warranty denial over its use and you are free to use whatever you want after warranty.
Synthetics have many positive characteristics. Blends have many of the best attributes of both conventional and synthetics.
Synthetics may not make a good break-in oil and I have heard that oil consumption (burning) may increase in some cases. Not that increased consumption is detrimental to the engine.
MS-6395 is still the recommended spec for motor oil in yours and my Chryslers. I feel that the factory knows what is best for its babies, so I will continue to use the recommended oil in mine. I have had no problems relating to engine lubrication and longevity with mine on a premium conventional oil and regular changes either.
Aftermarket additives are another story. Most are marketing snake oil and none are recommended by Chrysler or most other manufacturers.
Some say it is 'sour grapes' because the auto manufacturer doesn't have their brand name on it and would have to license it, but I don't think that they are that petty and I doubt that many of these 'Miracle oils' actually do anything to help your engine or meet some of their wild claims.
A premium motor oil meeting or exceeding MS-6395 should already have a good blend of the necessary compounds in it.
 
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