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Hard to say if it is true or not, some things do get picked up in the halls, all unconfirmed. On the other side of that, if they do, for example, do reduce the power output potential it does nothing but help the racer make gains that much greater than expected, so it would have an on-track advantage. There are tons of things that can be done these days with the computer inputs, things a person on the street may not need, but on the track could mean the difference of winning or coming in second. As far as the Ferrari goes, hey, they have been at this a lot longer than Viper, let them stand on their own, or laurels, as so eloquently put.

Doesn't it catch you as funny.....a supposed news article written on a rumor. Go figure. Do your own work, which is a downfall to a lot of the reporting these days.
 

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AutoTechnician said:
They are not arbitrary. There is a tire standard produced by the ASTM, and manufacturers test their tires relative to that one.
Actually it was made by DOT/NHTSA, and it is alot more arbitrary than you might think. You can compare treadwear ratings between tires of the same manufacturer, but I wouldn't recommend doing it against other manufacturers. Read these two links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treadwear_rating

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=48

Some interesting quotes:


Unfortunately, the rating that is of the most interest to consumers is the one that appears to be the least consistent. While the Treadwear Grade was originally intended to be assigned purely scientifically, it has also become a marketing tool used by manufacturers to help position and promote their tires.
The problem with UTQG Treadwear Grades is that they are open to some interpretation on the part of the tire manufacturer because they are assigned after the tire has only experienced a little treadwear as it runs the 7,200 miles. This means that the tire manufacturers need to extrapolate their raw wear data when they are assigning Treadwear Grades, and that their grades can to some extent reflect how conservative or optimistic their marketing department is. Typically, comparing the Treadwear Grades of tire lines within a single brand is somewhat helpful, while attempting to compare the grades between different brands is not as helpful.
The Treadwear Grade describes how a tire manufacturer views the wear of a given tire. In theory, this means that a tire with a 200 grade will wear twice as long as a tire with a 100 grade. However, tire manufacturers are not under any obligation to grade a tire based on the test results, except to say that they can not overstate the grade. This is enforced by NHTSA requiring documentation to justify any assignment of a grade on a tire.

As Course Monitoring Tires have changed, their treadwear grades have changed to numbers considerably higher than 100. As a result, it would be incorrect to say that a tire with a treadwear grade of 200 gets twice the life of the Course Monitoring Tire.
It is legal and permissible for a tire manufacturer to give a particular tire line a lower treadwear grade. For example: If the highest treadwear grade in a manufacturer's line up is 600, then a tire line with a lower treadwear test result might receive a grade of 400, instead of the 480 it could possibly receive.
 

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Plymouth Makes It
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Performance competition between Ferrari and Viper could only be a good thing. Plymouth was suppose to be the economy car and would best Dodge occasionally of course Dodge had to answer back. I think it would be great FREE advertising for both if would "secretly" compete. Racing would be boring if there were no challenges. I would like to see the sometimes you win sometimes you lose advertising again!!

This is not Mercedes any more.
 
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