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Why isnt there a Dodge "E-Charger" or a "E-Challenger"?
 
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Why isnt there a Dodge "E-Charger" or a "E-Challenger"?
You're joking right? They may make one someday, but all they know how to do is stuff Hellcats in anything that will fit. While Ford has been planning for the future. It's a gutsy call on Ford's part, but may pay off handsomely.
 

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The real game changer will be the F-150 Lightning. If it lives up to all the hype, Ram and Chevy will be playing catch-up for several years. GM at least has a plan, Ram because of very poor management opinions on electrics, is years behind GM. They will be the new steam engine companies still promoting the benefits of coal powered steam engines over diesel powered locomotives in the late 40s. None survived, even ones that converted later.
 

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The real game changer will be the F-150 Lightning. If it lives up to all the hype, Ram and Chevy will be playing catch-up for several years. GM at least has a plan, Ram because of very poor management opinions on electrics, is years behind GM. They will be the new steam engine companies still promoting the benefits of coal powered steam engines over diesel powered locomotives in the late 40s. None survived, even ones that converted later.
Yep, Ford has had the best selling pickup forever.

Will they be able to keep that record going with the F-150 Lightning?

That will be the real test for Ford.
 

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Yep, Ford has had the best selling pickup forever.

Will they be able to keep that record going with the F-150 Lightning?

That will be the real test for Ford.
There were people posting here that were sure the Ecoboost engine would kill Ford's truck sales.
Then they were sure the aluminum construction would kill Ford's truck sales.
Maybe innovation is part of the reason Ford stays on top.
 

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There were people posting here that were sure the Ecoboost engine would kill Ford's truck sales.
Then they were sure the aluminum construction would kill Ford's truck sales.
Maybe innovation is part of the reason Ford stays on top.
AMEN!
 

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I still believe until there is new battery tech and a solid recharging network, the best answer for most is a plug-in Hybrid and that should be very doable for Stellantis in the near term. That tech can be sold to the masses. Full electric power for all your around town errands, with gas engine for longer trips or extra power/sound. Those have to be close to release in all the larger vehicles I would think?
 

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I still believe until there is new battery tech and a solid recharging network, the best answer for most is a plug-in Hybrid and that should be very doable for Stellantis in the near term. That tech can be sold to the masses. Full electric power for all your around town errands, with gas engine for longer trips or extra power/sound. Those have to be close to release in all the larger vehicles I would think?
I'd like to see Stellantis offering both PHEV and EV versions of most of their vehicles. Even with range and infrastructure where it is today, the American 2-car family would get along just fine with an EV and PHEV - the EV for regular commuter duty, the PHEV for long trips. IMO the biggest holdup for EVs right now is purchase price, which probably is addressed by new battery tech you mentioned.
 

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I suspect most of the Mustang is based on Rivian’s advanced technology, but that just means Ford was smart enough to dive into the market at the right time - or they just assumed Bezos was smart and did what he did. Amazon agreed to buy 100,000 Rivian vans before Ford started their huge buy-in. Marchionne’s strategy was like Daimler’s—wait until the dust is settled and partner with someone. I'm not necessarily critical of that, since it's an awful lot cheaper and less risky, but it also means the company will be a marginal player ten years down the road. Government regulations or no government regulations, given that most people buy ordinary gasoline powered cars and use them to commute under 40 miles, I'd assume electric would be the norm eventually no matter what.
 

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I still believe until there is new battery tech and a solid recharging network, the best answer for most is a plug-in Hybrid and that should be very doable for Stellantis in the near term. That tech can be sold to the masses. Full electric power for all your around town errands, with gas engine for longer trips or extra power/sound. Those have to be close to release in all the larger vehicles I would think?
FCA was far behind on electrification. That was the other benefit of the merger because PSA was much further ahead.

PROOF is in the lineups. PSA is introducing hybrids across all the brands (without favoritism) while FCA is offering one here and one there for Jeep, Alfa and Maserati. Please spare me the "its coming" nonsense.

The other PROOF is the Alfa Tonale that Jean-Phillipe Imparato delayed so they could improve the electrification that FCA had engineered.

Stellantis will have to accelerate electrification and that is the purpose of the product teams and platform sharing, but it will be a mix of adding it to existing (Wrangler 4xe) versus new product.
 

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Electric cars do nothing for me...I was a car guy my whole life...Electric is just a car for a non car person!

Same as listening to Music and not hearing it..Drinking Alcohol and not getting a buzz or drunk as people like to do..Having sex and not feeling anything,thats electric cars!
 

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Cant wait for road tolls,price per mile and increased electricity rates,that will be really fun...

Thing is until you have 1 minute full charge and places to charge..Apartment dwellers are screwed....People driving all night to go somewhere are screwed! Oh well,enjoy the future,you wont even own one or anything and be happy as they say!
 

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I suspect most of the Mustang is based on Rivian’s advanced technology, but that just means Ford was smart enough to dive into the market at the right time - or they just assumed Bezos was smart and did what he did. Amazon agreed to buy 100,000 Rivian vans before Ford started their huge buy-in. Marchionne’s strategy was like Daimler’s—wait until the dust is settled and partner with someone. I'm not necessarily critical of that, since it's an awful lot cheaper and less risky, but it also means the company will be a marginal player ten years down the road. Government regulations or no government regulations, given that most people buy ordinary gasoline powered cars and use them to commute under 40 miles, I'd assume electric would be the norm eventually no matter what.
You really aren't taking into account how Americans buy vehicles.

Most Europeans after '97 bought a subcompact hatch with a small Diesel engine. I would expect in Europe BEVs will become the norm.

In the US the same kind of buying behavior would give us a fleet that was 90% compact 4 cylinder cars. Instead we get a fleet that is 18% pickups, 22% conventional cars, 50% SUV/CUV, and 10% others (vans, minivans, sports cars).

From American buying habits you can be certain that PHEVs will become the norm in the US. People will want a car that has the capability to take a road trip in remote locations, even if they only use that capability a few times a year, or never.
 

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You really aren't taking into account how Americans buy vehicles.

Most Europeans after '97 bought a subcompact hatch with a small Diesel engine. I would expect in Europe BEVs will become the norm.

In the US the same kind of buying behavior would give us a fleet that was 90% compact 4 cylinder cars. Instead we get a fleet that is 18% pickups, 22% conventional cars, 50% SUV/CUV, and 10% others (vans, minivans, sports cars).

From American buying habits you can be certain that PHEVs will become the norm in the US. People will want a car that has the capability to take a road trip in remote locations, even if they only use that capability a few times a year, or never.
I agree and so does Toyota.

Americans enjoy the ability to jump in the car and take a road-trip. Having a PHEV where their daily routine requires no gas and they do not have range anxiety for long trips is why they will be the dominant force for decades to come in North America.

BEVs will be slightly more popular than city cars currently.
 

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Another source out there is hydrogen. Not sure where it's going, but it leaves lithium in the dust in power density.
 

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Another source out there is hydrogen. Not sure where it's going, but it leaves lithium in the dust in power density.
Yup, hydrogen will be big in Class 6-8 trucks and such—and seagoing ships. Toyota is in the lead there. Hydrogen did not make much sense until wind turbine and solar costs plummeted; now we have grids with overcapacity in renewables (which are relatively inexpensive). It makes sense to me that one would build double the wind and solar one needs in a particular grid, and then use them to create hydrogen fuel when they are not needed to keep things going. Right now the main thing they do to counter fluctuations in power demand is they keep nuclear, coal, etc going, and shut off the turbines, because it's easy. Instead, they could keep the turbines on and (a) fluctuate output of nat-gas plants, which is easy on the more modern designs, and (b) generate hydrogen with the extra, varying demand instead of varying capacity.

As for "car guy" stuff, 98% of the public either doesn't care or prefers electric’s torque anyway. There aren't that many instant-on gasoline engines (392 counts!). All this stuff about "what about an emergency," well, if people top off every night, they have about the same range as a gasoline car on one tank of gas. How many people keep a spare 20 gallons of fuel in their car? (Assuming a major emergency, the gas stations will likely be inaccessible too, for most people.) And then hydrogen will probably be a solution.

I don't think Ford, of all companies, would be diving into electric power if it wasn't the future. Ford talks a good game and always has, but their execs (and most of GM’s) have pretty much the mind-set of ExxonMobile.

Will there be solutions for people who run out of power or whatever? Maybe. It'll be worked out. How many people insist on just having a spare tire?

However... I'm not going to rebut any rebuttals because this is something like the 30th thread with the same tired arguments.
 

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Another source out there is hydrogen. Not sure where it's going, but it leaves lithium in the dust in power density.
PSA has already shown their electric vans using hydrogen (sharing many parts) because hydrogen seems better for heavier loads.
 

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Cant wait for road tolls,price per mile and increased electricity rates,that will be really fun...
I mean as someone that's lived in Orlando, pretty much every expressway in Florida is tolled. That's nothing new.
 

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As far as I have read profitibility has still been an isssue with EVs. Great to have fantastic products but you still have to make money. Everyone assumes scale will solve this and it probably will. But a lot of these investments seem bets to me...
 
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