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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey peoples

Well today, I serviced my differential in my 05 Dakota, which is a 8.25 stock. Ten bolt cover. The last time I changed the gear oil was 4 years ago, and I used one quart. Yes 0ne. Lately I was scared and had to service it immediately. So After I drained it all out, took off the cover, there were no metal shavings. The used gear oil may be all dark, but well textured. The gears look good. So, do anyone know how many quarts of gear oil it takes? I put in a quart and a half. Not topped off.

Second issue While cruising there this on/off grinding effect on the front. Is it the bearings?
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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Fluid level within a 1/2" of the bottom of the fill hole should be OK when cold. The fluid level will rise as the oil warms. Use a fluid that says that it meets Chrysler MS-9763 (material standard) on the label.
If the truck sees heavy loads or pulls a trailer, you may want to use a synthetic hypoid fluid that meets Chrysler MS-8985.
The 8.25" rear axle fluid capacity should be 2.1L (4.4 pts).

Bearing or tire noise may be all the time? Are you doing anything in particular when the noise occurs, like cornering, 4WD, accelerating or decelerating?
It wouldn't hurt to change front diff and T/case fluid for maintenance purposes, or any fluid services for that matter if they haven't been done. Fluids do age and 'wear out'.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Fluid level within a 1/2" of the bottom of the fill hole should be OK when cold. The fluid level will rise as the oil warms. Use a fluid that says that it meets Chrysler MS-9763 (material standard) on the label.
If the truck sees heavy loads or pulls a trailer, you may want to use a synthetic hypoid fluid that meets Chrysler MS-8985.
The 8.25" rear axle fluid capacity should be 2.1L (4.4 pts).

Bearing or tire noise may be all the time? Are you doing anything in particular when the noise occurs, like cornering, 4WD, accelerating or decelerating?
It wouldn't hurt to change front diff and T/case fluid for maintenance purposes, or any fluid services for that matter if they haven't been done. Fluids do age and 'wear out'.
Well, in the owner's manual it said to use 75W-140 MS-8985 gear oil. So that's what I did.
My Dakota is only a 4X2. The grind noise happens when turning or going straight. Not at high speeds and hardly any resistance. If it's the tires, I'm okay with it. Bearing? Well will see. As long as I know that I have no real problem with the differential. I doubt a differential would grind.
 

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1966 Crown Coupe, 2016 200 S AWD, 1962 Lark Daytona V8.
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Any cupping or scalloping on the front tire tread area? Usually one can feel a 'sawtooth' or rippled edge by running your hand around the circumference of the tire tread. A front/rear tire rotation may change or lessen the noise.
Does the noise vary with speed or load? Could the grinding be mistaken for a heat shield rattle or similar noise that wouldn't be so dependent on vehicle speed or load?
 

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Could it be brakes?
I would expect grinding in the diff to create a very short life.
 

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In general, gears have a wirring sound, bearings grind (if bad).
 

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If grinding sound is constan, or almost constant, probably a bearing. Which also includes wheel bearings
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay. I concluded to the what happen. When my driving isn't quiet and smooth, the front wheels and bearings are ruled out. What I did, since I have a MT, while cruising above 50MPH with the grinding noise/felt, I put down the clutch. And the noise stop. Let got the clutch that puts the load on the drivetrain, back to the grinding noise.
When parked, I got under to look at the driveshaft which is two piece. One end to the transmission, a center, and other end to the differential. Turns out, the U joint in the center has some play in it. Because the other two ends are perfectly still. No movement in it. So, I guess the center U Joint has gone defect which cause the off balance spinning.
 

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Thats very possible, its a simple and cheap fix to do. Change all of em while your at it.
 
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