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Radioactive
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SuperShadow said:
Okay, first winter done, still a few flurries here and there but I'll say its done. Question..... What kind of fuel consumption are the owners in the northern climates getting over the winter. This year was colder than many of the past winters but I really wasn't liking the 21.3L/100 km (11 mpg!!!!!) when the mercury was below -30 for extended periods!!! Anyone else experience this or am I the only one??? Please feel free to chime in and thanks :)
Ours was showing similar (or worse) for most of the winter... the Mrs. auto-starts and idles for 10 minutes before driving it for 10 min (city). :|

Now that the weather is warming up, it is in the high teens (L/100km).

Highway, from warm, I get ~9L/100km.
 

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Which shows that excessive idling is a bad thing for gas mileage, as well as engine longevity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Jeff2KPatriotBlue said:
In addition to the high fuel consumption, the oil change monitor tripped at 3000 km. :(
Mine didn't go off at all!! I took it in at 8K because thats the factory interval.


Jeff2KPatriotBlue said:
Ours was showing similar (or worse) for most of the winter... the Mrs. auto-starts and idles for 10 minutes before driving it for 10 min (city). :|

Now that the weather is warming up, it is in the high teens (L/100km).

Highway, from warm, I get ~9L/100km.
I got 8.8L/100kms the other day, mostly highway. BTW, not anywhere near the 7.9L/100km listed by Transport Canada, maybe needs to break in a bit yet?

Bob Lincoln said:
Which shows that excessive idling is a bad thing for gas mileage, as well as engine longevity.
You folks in warmer climes sure do like to talk about "Long/excessive" idling times. Until you drive for two weeks straight without seeing the temperature rise above -30C (15F) you cannot speak about excessive idling. It is a necessity at those times and I don't give a darn about what people say, I would understand losing even 10% in fuel economy but dropping 50% (which was and still is my original beef!!) is simply not acceptable for a vehicle made in 2012!!

I WILL switch over to synthetic fluids this summer and i will be here to let everyone know how that works out and I'd bet that I don't lose half of my fuel economy numbers this coming winter season...time will tell!!
 

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It's not opinion - it's fact.

1) Cold engine operation will give you about half the gas mileage of that when the engine is warm.
2) Idling gives you zero miles per gallon while you are at idle.
3) You cannot change either of these facts.

All you can do to mitigate it is to keep your vehicle well-tuned, minimize idling, and drive for best fuel economy. To what extent you do these three things is entirely up to you. I understand that very cold climates cause longer warmup times and may require more idling to make sure oil gets to the cam. However, that being the case, you have to accept the fuel penalty of living in a cold climate.

And we do see 15F in winter, sometimes for extended periods. Usually single digits for at least several days a winter. My warmup period during those times is about 20 seconds, then I drive off at moderate speeds, and the engine is warm within 3-4 miles.
 

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Agree.
Mom's Caliber got about 12% better overall fuel economy after breaking-in at 18,000 miles (~30,000 km) than when we first got it.
We usually have a couple of weeks at a time of sub-zero winter here around Rochester NY and deep lake-effect snow makes for slow going at times with lights, wipers, defogger and heater all going.
Conditions like this are no time for fuel economy checks. They will be very poor. Even 4-cyls have a hard time getting over 20 mpg (12 L/100km). This past winter seemed a lot more brutal than last winter.
I hope that your fuel economy improves with the warmer weather and more break-in km.
 

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My winter mileage on my '11 R/T is equally brutal as the other Canadians posting here. Note that we see extended periods of temperatures below the -30C range. It's not unusual for a vehicle to take 10-15 minutes to reach regular operating temperature. Especially bearing in mind that the outside air passing through the heater core and the rad is so cold resulting in a prolonged warm up time.

I haven't tracked mine except for the EVIC computer but it gets to over 20L/100km in the winter (city). I'll get around 14L/100km in the summer (city).

Either way, I've found the city mileage to be pretty poor in the Journey with the 3.6. However, get it out on the highway and it does very well.
 

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Another way to shorten the time the engine is in open-loop, and speed up the cabin warm-up: plug in a block heater. I plug in my Dakota when the overnight lows are forecast below 0 F (-18 C) and use a timer so that the heater is turned on 2-3 hours before I need to leave in the morning. Fargo had about 40 days that met my criteria this past winter, and I always had noticeable heat coming from the vents by the time I'd gone 3 miles of my 4.5-mile morning commute.
 
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