Allpar Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1951 Nash Statesman with the Nash Six 184 flathead. Facing engine from front left side has compartment on side of engine that had 3 bolts holding cover in place. under plate are 2 gears that the shaft of one obviously runs off cam shaft. Do these gears have anything to do with the distributor and the timing? Thanks for any info. My car ran perfectly until I stupidly removed the cap and the gears fell out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,012 Posts
most certaninly yes, distributor is usually driven by the cam on this types of engines.
- whats your problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Actually that picture is exactly what I have been trying to describe. There are 2 bolts on each side and 1 on the bottom. I thought it was an oil filter and took the plate off. 2 gears fell out 1 with a short shaft with slot on end. The second gear has no shaft. Car ran perfectly before I did this now it acts like it’s not getting any spark. Gears would only go back in after gear with slotted shaft was positioned a certain way. I’m thinking it’s some how change the firing order but that’s just guessing. Any ideas?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,623 Posts
Those gears would likely have timing marks to index at TDC with the rotor pointing at #1?
This image shows the distributor-side and what looks like a vacuum pump driven off the rear of the generator?
I have a 1955 Motor Service manual that may show auxiliary shaft and gear orientation?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,140 Posts
Actually that picture is exactly what I have been trying to describe. There are 2 bolts on each side and 1 on the bottom. I thought it was an oil filter and took the plate off. 2 gears fell out 1 with a short shaft with slot on end. The second gear has no shaft. Car ran perfectly before I did this now it acts like it’s not getting any spark. Gears would only go back in after gear with slotted shaft was positioned a certain way. I’m thinking it’s some how change the firing order but that’s just guessing. Any ideas?
I believe you got into the oil pump. The gear with the shaft goes up into a hole and mates with the distributor and the other is just An idler driven by the gear with the shaft. There should be two holes going into the block just above and below where the gears mesh. One goes to goes to the pan area and one two the oil gallery. I suspect that the drive gear for the distributor AND oil pump is mounted on the distributor and they are not indexed. The only index would be to align with the slot in the bottom of the distributor so it will go all the way into the housing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,623 Posts
See fig. 16 for series 20 and 60 engines. The one pump gear (rotor or vane) is driven by the pump drive shaft. The shaft is splined to the cam driven gear. If the shaft were to slip out of the drive gear splines, it could require pan removal to re-attach it.
The pump drive shaft is keyed is keyed to the rotor. A thrust ball sits in its pocket and keeps the drive shaft and rotor in place.
The other rotor is passive. Its axle pin may float in the housing. Together the rotors turn and pump oil.
There is no timing or indexing for these 'gears'.
The distributor has its own individual shaft driven by the camshaft. It does not share any drive with the oil pump.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,140 Posts
See fig. 16 for series 20 and 60 engines. The one pump gear (rotor or vane) is driven by the pump drive shaft. The shaft is splined to the cam driven gear. If the shaft were to slip out of the drive gear splines, it could require pan removal to re-attach it.
The pump drive shaft is keyed is keyed to the rotor. A thrust ball sits in its pocket and keeps the drive shaft and rotor in place.
The other rotor is passive. Its axle pin may float in the housing. Together the rotors turn and pump oil.
There is no timing or indexing for these 'gears'.
The distributor has its own individual shaft driven by the camshaft. It does not share any drive with the oil pump.
Pics are for OHV not a flathead.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,623 Posts
The Ambassador 6 was an OHV (fig.1).
The Statesman "Flying Scot" 6 was still an L-head (fig.2).
The early Hudson and Ambassador V8 was supplied by Packard.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top