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Claimed New Dodge Crossover In the Works


Take this with a grain of salt.

In an article by Automotive News released on Sunday September 22, 2019.... they claim they have insider knowledge a new Dodge crossover is in the works. They state the Journey's time is limited and the Durango "may" be gone in a few years.

It will still probably be a day or so before the tabloid/blog type website's post their speculatory articles up with no basis or evidence other than this article which itself is claiming "sources" told it this info. None the less, I wanted to share this with you before you found it elsewhere. There is no deep information in this article.

The article is here and written by Vince Bond Jr. Could it be related to this crossover GM Authority claimed Chrysler was making in 2017? We'll find out.

Have a good day everyone.
 

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According to Auto News this week:

Both brands [Jeep and Ram] will compete with rosters full of fresh products in the years ahead. The future of FCA's other brands aren't as clear cut.

Dodge is carrying on with its aging muscle cars, while the long-standing Journey and Grand Caravan could be coming to the end of their lives soon. Even the Durango is a question mark as a new three-row crossover that could replace it looms.
 

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There was supposed to be a two-pronged Journey replacement strategy:
* For Dodge, a CUV based on the Stelvio that was once rumored to come just a few months after Stelvio. Instead, it's been two years of nothing.
* For Chrysler, a "people move" supposedly a Chrysler "Grand Commander". Now that's even off the radar.
Buy a Jeep., I guess, that's the only option presented for the future.
 

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It really would be nice, and a smart move on their part if they would outline wth is going on. One of four reasons why, you pick. One, there is no plan, and the brands are in stasis. Two, there is future product, and for whatever stupid reason, nothing at all is discussed, not even it's existence. Three, everything is being withheld for a pending merger. Or four, they have no clue what direction they want these two brands to take, hense the delays. I'm just not buying what some former members used to feed us, which was, just wait good things will replace these models.
 

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It really would be nice, and a smart move on their part if they would outline wth is going on. One of four reasons why, you pick. One, there is no plan, and the brands are in stasis. Two, there is future product, and for whatever stupid reason, nothing at all is discussed, not even it's existence. Three, everything is being withheld for a pending merger. Or four, they have no clue what direction they want these two brands to take, hense the delays. I'm just not buying what some former members used to feed us, which was, just wait good things will replace these models.
Fifth: they don’t really know what they are doing and want to give themselves full latitude until the last possible moment to wing it. Sixth: they know that the customer base won’t like hearing what they are truly planning.

There’s something to be said for providing a clear product outline and timetable: auto buyers operate in 4 - 7 year horizons; unless they know there’s something worth waiting for, they will end up going to the competition —as many on here are already doing.
 

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How long have we been hearing that there was to be a Dodge branded CUV coming out of Brampton?
At one time it was hinted it might come from overseas instead. But there is no evidence of either existing.
 
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It really would be nice, and a smart move on their part if they would outline wth is going on. One of four reasons why, you pick. One, there is no plan, and the brands are in stasis. Two, there is future product, and for whatever stupid reason, nothing at all is discussed, not even it's existence. Three, everything is being withheld for a pending merger. Or four, they have no clue what direction they want these two brands to take, hense the delays. I'm just not buying what some former members used to feed us, which was, just wait good things will replace these models.
My feeling is that all the posts over the 5+ past years promising exciting new products were from people who were mislead as much as we were - either from plans that never were, plans that got long delayed, or plans that were cancelled.
It happens.It happens with most companies. It just happens so frequently with FCA. I know, we've got new paint colors and more black wheel designs! Whoopie!
 

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True or not true. Why can't they keep the names. Durango and Journey are names people know and I don't thing those names carry any 'baggage'.
That is the million dollar question.

The best answer I’ve been able to come up is:
  1. When you are sitting in a board room making these decisions, surrounded by people who have been working on these vehicles for years, there’s 100% awareness —and knowledge— in that room of what this new vehicle is and looks like. Within that context, there’s a tendency to assume everyone else in the outside world will know what it is the moment they see it, no matter what it ends up being called.
  2. Changing names is the quickest, easiest —and laziest— way to show change, leave their mark, show “innovation”, particularly when an executive seeks career advancement and won’t be there in six months to deal with the consequences.
A well-established nameplate gives consumers the sense familiarity and continuity that facilitates forking out a significant chunk of change on a vehicle that is going to have to last them many years. But the cost in time and money that it takes to established a brand-new nameplate on the market tends to get underestimated, usually due to a combination of 1 and 2 above.

It is no coincidence that this practice is more common among the domestics, where staff get rotated much more than at tier-1 Japanese automakers.
 

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That is the million dollar question.

The best answer I’ve been able to come up is:
  1. When you are sitting in a board room making these decisions, surrounded by people who have been working on these vehicles for years, there’s 100% awareness —and knowledge— in that room of what this new vehicle is and looks like. Within that context, there’s a tendency to assume everyone else in the outside world will know what it is the moment they see it, no matter what it ends up being called.
  2. Changing names is the quickest, easiest —and laziest— way to show change, leave their mark, show “innovation”, particularly when an executive seeks career advancement and won’t be there in six months to deal with the consequences.
A well-established nameplate gives consumers the sense familiarity and continuity that facilitates forking out a significant chunk of change on a vehicle that is going to have to last them many years. But the cost in time and money that it takes to established a brand-new nameplate on the market tends to get underestimated, usually due to a combination of 1 and 2 above.

It is no coincidence that this practice is more common among the domestics, where staff get rotated much more than at tier-1 Japanese automakers.
Add to the fact that the Japanese hardly ever withdrawal from a product segment unless there's nothing selling. Even if they aren't successful the first or second go around, they keep improving until they're competitive.
 

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Add to the fact that the Japanese hardly ever withdrawal from a product segment unless there's nothing selling. Even if they aren't successful the first or second go around, they keep improving until they're competitive.
Indeed. From what I’ve seen, top Japanese automakers view a customer as an asset that is to be retained and optimized, and treat customer acquisition and retention as activities that offer profit opportunity and require financial investment.

At FCA, it appears the focus is primarily on plant utilization and product manufacturing, secondarily on unit sales, margins and after-sales. The customer is just a demographic profile for whom to build a vehicle. Customer retention and acquisition are not viewed as activities that represent profit opportunity and, as such, don’t require investment.
 

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Changing names is the quickest, easiest —and laziest— way to show change, leave their mark, show “innovation”, particularly when an executive seeks career advancement and won’t be there in six months to deal with the consequences.
Years ago, when I worked for a different company, they hired a new VP of marketing. She came in with a sweeping rebranding campaign and threw out the 30-year old division logo and marketing color scheme, replacing them with a new logo and new (rather odd orange and tan) brand colors.

She asked one of my co-workers how soon the new logo and brand colors could be on all the corporate documentation, and Leslie replied "A complete changeover, especially for printed documents, will take at least two years. But new marketing directions usually only last about 6 months."

Sure enough, within 6 months there was a new marketing VP and no one ever followed up to make the new logo and colors were used (even though we did follow our new procedures to implement them). I'm sure the VP's resumé mentioned her "successful" rebranding campaign at company X.
 

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The also failed to mention the Alfa GTV in their story. I'm actually disappointed in the article. Automotive News is usually good at this stuff, but the coming GTV model was spoon-fed to the press and it was still left out by the publication.
 
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