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NASCAR is on the wane, if not done. Some NASCAR tracks are removing seats, usually on the back stretch, so the empty seats don't show up on TV. Former big time fan. Currently a 'who cares' fan.
For sure not done, still the biggest motorsports in the states. If Nascar is dead then every other motorsports here are dead too, but thats not the case. Nascar has plateaued for awhile now, nhra is dipping (while losing drivers), and indy car as on a slight uphill that's almost flat but still very far behind nascar.
 

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For sure not done, still the biggest motorsports in the states. If Nascar is dead then every other motorsports here are dead too, but thats not the case. Nascar has plateaued for awhile now, nhra is dipping (while losing drivers), and indy car as on a slight uphill that's almost flat but still very far behind nascar.
Should be National Association of Kit Car Auto racing.
 

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Once a fan, always a fan. I love racing and support all kinds. I honestly miss watching those crazy vehicles racing on the water road courses some 10 plus years ago.
 

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It no longer exists in the true sense of it's prime years in the 50's & 60's.
Though they may have been death traps, the drivers knew it and most drove accordingly.
Now the "cars" in NASCAR bear no resemblance to what is sold in showrooms on Monday.
And with all the safety devices and precautions in the vehicles, the drivers can be, and are
reckless as opposed to cautious.
When King Richard left Plymouth, my interest in NASCAR, although minor, ceased completely.
I can't name a single driver (or a married one) and have no idea which "makes" (and I use that term VERY LOOSELY) even compete any more.
Nor, do I even care.
For somebody who hates NASCAR so much you must be watching it to have all these bad comments.
 

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The main rumors are that Honda or Acura would be joining the series. Acura is the main name being thrown around with their new TLX and their push to enter motorsports in different leagues. They are really proud of their new sports sedan and they want to promote it.

There have been minor rumors about Dodge coming back. I hope this is true, but it is unlikely and most die-hard Mopar fans pushing this idea.

Others have brought up Kia and the K5 or Hyundai but there have been no indications from the conglomerate they would join.
 

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NO.
I currently do not intentionally watch at all.
I may catch a glimpse while channel surfing, I do not linger.
That ship sailed 40+ years ago.
I turned on a NASCAR race early this year. A car had Mustang written on the front bumper cover. It was not a Mustang. I changed channels.
 

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One thing they definitely have in common with their street counterparts; the more safety improvements they add the more reckless the drivers become.
 

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It no longer exists in the true sense of it's prime years in the 50's & 60's.
Though they may have been death traps, the drivers knew it and most drove accordingly.
Now the "cars" in NASCAR bear no resemblance to what is sold in showrooms on Monday.
And with all the safety devices and precautions in the vehicles, the drivers can be, and are
reckless as opposed to cautious.
When King Richard left Plymouth, my interest in NASCAR, although minor, ceased completely.
I can't name a single driver (or a married one) and have no idea which "makes" (and I use that term VERY LOOSELY) even compete any more.
Nor, do I even care.
NASCAR’s prime was not in the 50’s and 60’s. It was basically a east coast/southern thing. Most races had less than 10,000 spectators at the track. Most people couldn’t give you the name of a driver back then if you asked them. The first live race was in ‘79 at Dayton, before that, you got condensed highlights weeks later. CBS took a chance on broadcasting the race and almost decided to not broadcast other races after the wreck and fight between Yarborough and the Allison brothers on the last lap. They thought it was just a bunch of ********, not an actual sport. The ”prime” of NASCAR was the 80’s and 90’s. This began the climb in TV ratings and attendanc, NASCAR was becoming a household name. There was also some of the best competition ever in the sport. During the 50’s and 60’s, there were only a handful of teams that ran the entire season. Richard Petty won several of his championships because he was able to compete in all of the races. There were some great drivers, but there was just more competition in the 80’s and 90’s.

Earnhardt, Wallace, the Labontes, Waltrip, Martin, Elliott, Gordon, Irvin, Davy Allison, Rudd, Bonnet, Geoff Bodine, Gant, and Kulwicki were the young guns and the old guard, like Petty, Donnie Allison, Yarborough, Buck Baker, Buddy Baker, and Pearson were still running. Most of those named are considered to be in the top 20 of all time in NASCAR. Everything about NASCAR was bigger and better during that time, but it didn’t last.
 

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For sure not done, still the biggest motorsports in the states. If Nascar is dead then every other motorsports here are dead too, but thats not the case. Nascar has plateaued for awhile now, nhra is dipping (while losing drivers), and indy car as on a slight uphill that's almost flat but still very far behind nascar.
NASCAR has been on the decline for years, with this year being one of it worst years. TV viewership is down as much as 40% for some races, with attendance at all time lows. Many tracks have removed large sections of grandstands to give the illusion that it isn’t that bad. After NASCAR went woke with Confederate Flag ban, and jumping to conclusions without any investigating the noose incident, many fans left and won’t come back. Once NASCAR goes electric, it will be over, as will all other motor sports. Watching a bunch of quiet cars go around the track, or down the strip, just won’t bring the fans. No fans, no money, no sponsorships mean no more racing.
 

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Don't see Nascar going electric anytime soon. With cars going flat out, how long will batteries last? Will it be a battery changeout every few miles? That should bring some fan excitement for sure.
 

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NASCAR is no longer on a decline. It's stabilized and I believe has a lot of potential for another growth period.

The two races pointed out where ratings were down 40% was the Daytona 500 that got rained out and ran on a Monday when everyone was working. The other was a Saturday Pocono race that no-one knew was on a Saturday. Because the following day, the Sunday race of Pocono matched the previous years ratings.

If we are going to go after the drops in viewership, lets also talk about the gains.
The O'Reilly Auto Parts 253 had nearly 5 million viewers over the 3.2 million the previous year. The Dixie Vodka 400 at Homestead had 4.2 million viewers compared to 2.7 the previous year. The Food City Bristol race had 3.1 million compared to 2.9 the previous year. Richmond had 3.3 million over 2.7 million. Talladega had 4.7 million over 2.0 million the previous year. Kansas had 2.7 to 1.4 million. Dover had 2.4 million over 1.7 million. The Coca Cola 600 was 4 million over 3.9. What I am saying is the majority of races this year have had their tv ratings up or about the same. Source I could go on.

NASCAR track attendance has been an ongoing issue, but has had many sell outs this year, which they were not having previous years. Road America was a completely overcrowded sell-out. Nashville was a sell out. Many other tracks have had lower than peak attendance, but they have had steady attendance and more than previous years.

To say NASCAR is declining is no longer the case. It is either reached it's position averaging roughly 3 million viewers a week, or being on the edge of another growth spurt with all the new drivers, new talent, and new people watching. Demographics from the tv ratings have shown lots of new viewers, but also the viewers watching on tv. NASCAR's biggest gains have been through people streaming races online, which are not included on tv ratings. Depending on where you look and for which race, this can add as much as 400,000 to a million new viewers per race, possibly more. This is coming from roughly 50,000 streamers just back in 2018.
 
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