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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Found a “barn find” and after a quick google search decided I couldn’t pass it up. '67 Belvedere GTX. It’s been parked in an old, run down building since 91. I guess it’s time for me to learn about Mopar big blocks. Lol. This car was for sure built for power and not luxury. Manual steering and brakes. No “creature comforts” even for that era. Any and all help and/or advice is welcomed and appreciated. I just got 30 years of dirt and grime washed off so I can start to see what and where to start with the disassembly.
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Found a “barn find” and after a quick google search decided I couldn’t pass it up. '67 Belvedere GTX. It’s been parked in an old, run down building since 91. I guess it’s time for me to learn about Mopar big blocks. Lol. This car was for sure built for power and not luxury. Manual steering and brakes. No “creature comforts” even for that era. Any and all help and/or advice is welcomed and appreciated. I just got 30 years of dirt and grime washed off so I can start to see what and where to start with the disassembly. View attachment 81539 View attachment 81540 View attachment 81541 View attachment 81542 View attachment 81543
Hi nice find. That is a 440 RB motor and that car will perform with it tuned up.
 

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Welcome and congrats on the awesome find. I think It could be rare not having much options. GTX’s were usually the higher optioned model.
 

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Totally agree with the lack of options, especially manual steering. On the inside of the driver side fender, on the flat part just under the hood should be one or two rectangle build plates to check everything and verify what the car was equipped with originally.This is not all inclusive, but tons of info on it. And yep, 440 automatic should have an 8.75 rear end( limited slip for the model, in 3.23, 3.54, or 3.91 most likely, the last probably for more racing), but the manual brakes and manual steering is rather rare to see, and 3speed windshield wipers to boot. GTX was the businessman high end performance car, so she is special if the fender tag is accurate with the "standard" things like PS and PB not on the plate, along with the bench seat and column shifter.

There may also be a build sheet located between the spring and padding of the rear seat to really nail everything the car has, removing the rear seat is not that difficult.

In your engine picture, to the right of the radiator hose where the sparkplug wires are crossing, is a flat pad, right behind the timing cover surface, with numbers and letters stamped into that pad so the originality of the engine in the car itself can be checked (besides the ones on the side of the block). There are several sites that give details on the numbers and what they mean, but it is always fun to help someone out with these, get to see a rare beast such as this.
 

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Nice find.
GTX had upgraded trim (interior and exterior) and that's why it was considered a more luxurious muscle car. But things like power steering and brakes were still optional on the GTX. The 440 engine, heavy duty suspension and heavy duty drum brakes were standard on GTX.Back then there were few option groups so there were an almost infinite number of options combinations that could be built.
 

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Nice....Freaking ...Car!!!!! Beautiful colour and looks to be very restorable. Good for you and welcome!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Welcome to the forum :D

The body looks in great shape, and it's got some cool lines to it, giving it some "attitude" :cool:
It’s got a small dent in the drivers fender but found quite a bit of rust around the bottom of the rear window, in both quarters and trunk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Totally agree with the lack of options, especially manual steering. On the inside of the driver side fender, on the flat part just under the hood should be one or two rectangle build plates to check everything and verify what the car was equipped with originally.This is not all inclusive, but tons of info on it. And yep, 440 automatic should have an 8.75 rear end( limited slip for the model, in 3.23, 3.54, or 3.91 most likely, the last probably for more racing), but the manual brakes and manual steering is rather rare to see, and 3speed windshield wipers to boot. GTX was the businessman high end performance car, so she is special if the fender tag is accurate with the "standard" things like PS and PB not on the plate, along with the bench seat and column shifter.

There may also be a build sheet located between the spring and padding of the rear seat to really nail everything the car has, removing the rear seat is not that difficult.

In your engine picture, to the right of the radiator hose where the sparkplug wires are crossing, is a flat pad, right behind the timing cover surface, with numbers and letters stamped into that pad so the originality of the engine in the car itself can be checked (besides the ones on the side of the block). There are several sites that give details on the numbers and what they mean, but it is always fun to help someone out with these, get to see a rare beast such as this.
I was told it’s not the original engine.
 

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Welcome to Allpar, What an awesome find, looking forward to your progress with this gem
 

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Since the car is a 1967, there won't be a VIN stamp on the motor to positively know if it's the original engine.
You'll have to rely on engine stampings to see if the engine matches the car, based on date codes and if the engine is really a 440.
 

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It's not the original engine (unless, it was pulled and repainted), as the 1967 440s were all turquoise, not orange (not until 68).
And, as stated, they didn't stamp VINs onto engine blocks until 1968 model year, so no 67s have the VINs on the block, you just have to find a date correct engine (if you want to put it back to stock). Nothing wrong with a later year 440, though.

Looks like a VERY solid place to start (not a lot of rust, if any). Awesome body style (My Dad and I restored a 67 Dodge Coronet R/T many years ago, similar car from Dodge).

Good luck!

JS
 

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You won't get a VIN on the engine, but there is a casting date into the block in raised numbers, then verify the date of the block is (I have seen) up to a year prior to the build date of the car. The flat pad will have a letter code (never can remember letter to year myself) and engine size as the first two numbers (i.e., 44) showing it is a 440, lots of examples can be found with a simple search.
This link will give some of the details of what you can find, along with what to look at. I know this is not your car.
 

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It's not the original engine (unless, it was pulled and repainted), as the 1967 440s were all turquoise, not orange (not until 68).
And, as stated, they didn't stamp VINs onto engine blocks until 1968 model year, so no 67s have the VINs on the block, you just have to find a date correct engine (if you want to put it back to stock). Nothing wrong with a later year 440, though.

Looks like a VERY solid place to start (not a lot of rust, if any). Awesome body style (My Dad and I restored a 67 Dodge Coronet R/T many years ago, similar car from Dodge).

Good luck!

JS
And it would be cool to find an original air cleaner assy like in the brochure :cool:


 

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Well, gee. If it isn't the original engine, it's probably not worth anything. You should just give it to me and forget about it. LOL Anyway, that's a beautiful car and I'd like to welcome you to Allpar. You'll find a lot of help here for things you want to do to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You won't get a VIN on the engine, but there is a casting date into the block in raised numbers, then verify the date of the block is (I have seen) up to a year prior to the build date of the car. The flat pad will have a letter code (never can remember letter to year myself) and engine size as the first two numbers (i.e., 44) showing it is a 440, lots of examples can be found with a simple search.
This link will give some of the details of what you can find, along with what to look at. I know this is not your car.
I done a simple VIN search and came up with the basic info. The basic break down, I’ve found is RS23L77. R=Belvedere, S=GTX, 2=doors, 3=hardtop, L=440 4bbl high performance, 7=1967, 7=built is St. Louis MO, the last 6 numbers are the serial numbers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's not the original engine (unless, it was pulled and repainted), as the 1967 440s were all turquoise, not orange (not until 68).
And, as stated, they didn't stamp VINs onto engine blocks until 1968 model year, so no 67s have the VINs on the block, you just have to find a date correct engine (if you want to put it back to stock). Nothing wrong with a later year 440, though.

Looks like a VERY solid place to start (not a lot of rust, if any). Awesome body style (My Dad and I restored a 67 Dodge Coronet R/T many years ago, similar car from Dodge).

Good luck!

JS
Hey, I was told it’s a 68 440. Something happened to the original one so they dropped in a 68.
 
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