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Discussion Starter #121
There are vinyl protectants that contain UV blocker. However, if the car can be sheltered or covered, that is the best protection from the environment.
The hub can be separated from the drum. It just needs a press. If you are replacing the drums, you don't have to worry about distorting the drums in the press.
Thanks man! If I have to have the hub pressed into the new drum doesn't that predicate a risk of distortion?
 

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The hub must be pressed in evenly and straight, supporting around the center hole of the drum so you don't risk any chance of distortion. Surfaces must be clean and rust-free. The press must stop advancing once the hub/drum assembly is seated. Select press arbors that fit the job at hand.
Don't use a hammer. :(
 

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Simplify the hub back onto the center hub and put the drum on the hub, then flip the lug nuts over and do normal cross tightening to suck it down. If there is a tiny lip on the bottom of the lug nut threads, put a flat washer on it. Works for me every time and no distortion, do about 20lbs of torque at a time and when they don't tighten any more, increase the torque another 20lbs at a time.
 
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Discussion Starter #127
Nevermind, I found it.

I've got two BBD carbs - one from the original 318 that came with the car (1972) and the one from the junkyard engine - which was from 1978.

I'm thinking i'll rebuild the 72 carb rather than gamble on a poorly calibrated and maladjusted chinese copy. Thanks guys!

You might call your local junkyards and ask if they have Dodge trucks in your vintage and what their carburetor prices are. Or check online, as some yards now have their own sites. Carbs are fairly easy to remove, hoses first, then linkage, then 4 nuts. Wrench a Part in Texas charges $30 or so for a 2-barrel, regardless of condition. If a Pick n Pull is closer to you, they often have Mopars going back that far. Most of the carbs I've seen need a rebuild, but better to practice on a junkyard carb than the only one you currently have on the truck. The carb on your daughter's truck was made from the '74 to '84 model years. There were two BBDs then; the 318 should have the smaller one (1 1/4-inch).

Carbs might cost more at swap meets, depending on the vendor and whether it's been rebuilt, though I've bought them there as cheap as $5 (they were very dirty).

Ditto on the shop manual, preferably the factory service manual, as Chilton's, Haynes, and the like aren't as detailed.

I prefer the Carters to the Holleys, as the Carters perform better and are easier to work on. However, they will need a rebuild every few years due to the ethanol in the gasoline. The Carters also need the throttle shafts rebushed after so many miles -- maybe that's all that's wrong with yours. If you want to try a Holley, a 2280 model should work on your truck, but I don't think they were offered until the '79 model year. I'd first research before making that swap.
 

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Things to consider:
1) Make sure there is no wear where the shafts go through the body of the carb. This wear can be fixed by a competent carb shop. But this is probably the reason repop carbs are out there.
2) I'd pick the 72 carb over the 78 carb as the 78 is likely leaned out for emissions and some 1978 carbs may have electronic controls to be used with lean burn (depending on what the 78 donor was).
 
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Discussion Starter #129 (Edited)
Issue: no start


I have water in the floor every time it rains and we have had craploads of rain here over the past few weeks.

A few days ago it wouldnt start back after i stopped to air up tires in town - ended up just cranking until it fired and ran, then it died at a stoplight - ended up leaving it overnight at a BP downtown after replacing cap and rotor button with no fix.

The next day it started right up like normal but was hell to get restarted after turning it off. I was thinking the can of Chemtool B12 i put in the tank has flushed some gunk into the carb, so thats why ive been posting about carbs. Now - i have weak/no spark during cranking from the coil and no spark from the plug wires. I just changed the distributior/hall coil and set reluctor gap to .008 with no improvement.

The ballast resistor is good and the ignition module, although older, has been working fine.

Should i start digging under the dash for corrosion? Could it be the ignition switch? Here's a pic of the fuseblock.

Thanks for any help!
fuses.jpeg
 

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Well, it would be good housekeeping to disconnect the battery, remove the fuses one at a time, clean the fuseholders and install new fuses (because they DO age over the years), and reinstall, being careful to put the correct ratings in each one.
But I don't believe that's your trouble. You might have worn the battery down so that the spark is weak. Try putting it on a charger overnight at a 2-amp rate. It is possible that gunk has flushed through from the tank. How old is the gas in it?
And I hope those wires jammed into the fuseholders are not for any critical function. The correct way to connect them is to lower the fuse block and use parallel splices to connect them to the existing wires into the block. Be sure to use the correct one for the gauge wire.

3M 2-Port Dry Environment, Single U-Element Insulation Displacement Connector, PK of 50 - 1A075|801 - Grainger (at https://www.grainger.com/product/1A075?cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!166588026391!!!g!81032122797!&ef_id=VfBWSgAABJqlMIOu:20180928184813:s&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8ruArK7e3QIVwwOGCh38iA20EAYYAiABEgLGIPD_BwE )
 

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Discussion Starter #131
Well, it would be good housekeeping to disconnect the battery, remove the fuses one at a time, clean the fuseholders and install new fuses (because they DO age over the years), and reinstall, being careful to put the correct ratings in each one.
But I don't believe that's your trouble. You might have worn the battery down so that the spark is weak. Try putting it on a charger overnight at a 2-amp rate. It is possible that gunk has flushed through from the tank. How old is the gas in it?
And I hope those wires jammed into the fuseholders are not for any critical function. The correct way to connect them is to lower the fuse block and use parallel splices to connect them to the existing wires into the block. Be sure to use the correct one for the gauge wire.

3M 2-Port Dry Environment, Single U-Element Insulation Displacement Connector, PK of 50 - 1A075|801 - Grainger (at https://www.grainger.com/product/1A075?cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!166588026391!!!g!81032122797!&ef_id=VfBWSgAABJqlMIOu:20180928184813:s&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8ruArK7e3QIVwwOGCh38iA20EAYYAiABEgLGIPD_BwE )
Fuel is new last week. Full tank of 87 octane with the b12 and now a can of 108 octane boost. I'll charge the battery but that seems a bit counterintuitive - charge has been fine and when its gotten weak ive been jumping it with my Nissan. It wont even hit with starting fluid down the carb. Maybe ill pull plugs and dry everything out and try again.
 

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First thing to do is verify you have spark to the distributor, and if you do, then to a sparkplug itself, then, recognizing you have water entering the car (probably from the windshield wiper mountings through the body, that the water is falling onto the wiring harness through the bulkhead connector and this is the first place to start checking for corrosion, not the fuse block, which does look pretty good to me (visually), but verify that spark first.
 

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The water may be coming in from the top of the windshield. I had this problem in a '69 Imperial with a vinyl roof. The solution was to apply some silicone sealer along the edge of the chrome piece where it met the vinyl. Perhaps a better solution would have been to first remove the chrome piece, and apply it along the top of the windshield.

No spark makes me suspect the coil. If you have a good one on another Mopar, you might see if it works on the '72. Also, what kind of shape is the power lead in? Any fraying in any of the ignition system wires could cause your problem. Dana has a good point about the bulkhead connector.
 

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Discussion Starter #135
Windshield is sealed, leak is definitely wiper arms.
Spark verified from coil
No spark from dist
New plugs, wires, cap, button, ig module, ballast resistor.
Hall coil is from spares - shows continuity with meter.

Has to be something under the dash I reckon?
 

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Discussion Starter #136
T
No spark makes me suspect the coil. If you have a good one on another Mopar, you might see if it works on the '72. Also, what kind of shape is the power lead in? Any fraying in any of the ignition system wires could cause your problem. Dana has a good point about the bulkhead connector.
I have a spare coil, but im getting fire from the current one. Please define "power lead"?

Thanks guys!
 

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As previously mentioned, have you tried cleaning the bulkhead connector? I don't see where you made mention of that. This is a known problem area for corrosion on the older Mopars.
 
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Discussion Starter #138
Looks good from the engine compartment but i haven't been under the dash yet. I'm expecting some crud. Will post when i get a chance to get to it.
 

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Based on having spark at the coil and how you've described the problem, I think the problem is either in the distributor (as in the pickup coil has failed or is incorrectly gapped) or the ignition module is bad. Sadly, what used to be an item that never failed (the Chrysler electronic ignition module) isn't as robust any more.
 
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Discussion Starter #140
Based on having spark at the coil and how you've described the problem, I think the problem is either in the distributor (as in the pickup coil has failed or is incorrectly gapped) or the ignition module is bad. Sadly, what used to be an item that never failed (the Chrysler electronic ignition module) isn't as robust any more.
That's what i figured, so i replaced the pickup coil (gapped at .008) and the ignition module yesterday.

The reluctor is installed with the rotation arrow 180deg from the slot in the dist shaft, right?
Also -if the pickup coil shows full continuity with a meter, then it is good? If not, what is test procedure?

Thanks!
 
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