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Discussion Starter #1
91 Dynasty 3.3 The oil pan gasket is really leaking. I'm no expert under the hood, but I can do the simple stuff like this. I just need to ask for the tips and tricks which you all have been so kind to provide here.

Is there a particular brand of gasket to purchase? Should I coat the gasket with any sealant or just install it dry?
How much torque should I apply to the pan bolts? Did I leave anything out?

Thanks in advance. You guys have saved me much time and money.
 

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It is really pretty straight forward. NAPA carries the proper gasket, it is probably a rubber or rubber/metal gasket. Removing the pan is pretty easy, unbolt, but on occasion there may be a bracket or something like the starter that needs to be removed, not positive on this, look and see if you have clear access to all the bolts, remove what you need. Cleanliness is the most important thing, so after the old gasket is removed, make sure both the pan and the block edge are cleaned, I like using simple laquer thinner, acetone, something that will really remove any grease, oil or dirt, even the old gasket that sticks to the metal. Recommended or not, I always use a tiny bit of blue Permatex on both the pan edge and the block edge. Only need a smear about as thick as a piece of paper, so very sparingly wipe the surfaces. Get all the bolts started by finger, then tighten them with a socket and an extension by hand, this allows a very even squeezing of all the bolts to the pan and block first, then the manual says 17 foot pounds of torque, equivalent to tightening them with a socket, extension and the ratchet, holding the ratchet at the head and tightening them just about as much as you can by hand, go over them all a third time to double check the work.
 

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I highly recommend the Felpro PermaDry gasket OS30622R. You can put it on dry, its a combo metal/rubber gasket that prevents over torquing, and it is actually cheap for the 3.3L engine compared to other vehicles.
 

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I believe with the 2.2/2.5, there was a multi-piece gasket and a one-piece gasket. If you have a choice, I would recommend the one-piece gasket. I don't believe oil pans are like the 2.2/2.5 valve covers, where one type can use a one-piece gasket exclusively and the other has a myriad of choices. Keep in mind that you're going to have to align a complex shape and then have it stay in place while you bolt the pan on, while working upside-down, on your back, so anything that will help you get and keep that alignment is worth it. A little RTV (they sell "gasket maker RTV" at most parts stores) might help to tack the gasket on, like Dana mentioned.
 

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The Felpro gasket listed above comes with snap ups that will hold the gasket in place and the pan up while you tighten the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just bought the Felpro PermaDry gasket OS30622R. The instructions say to install it dry, no sealants. I will follow the instructions and install it without any gasket goop, but that does go against my instincts. We'll see. Thanks for the tips.
 

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Well now I'm not so sure about going without some type of sealant, especially at the seams where the timing chain cover housing and the rear main seal cover attach to the block. There are four obvious leak points there that I doubt the gasket can seal up by itself. Am I wrong?

And if I need to use a sealant at these points, which brand is best? Thanks again.
 

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I've used this gasket without any RTV on the 2.2/2.5 family of engines without any leaks and even missing a bolt in a place notorious for leaks. However, the 2.2 and 2.5 blocks are made pretty good in the sense that this gasket would work best.

I've seen other engines where this type of gasket may not seal well, however I have no experience with that. If you'd like you can apply some black RTV in those "leak points" if it makes you feel better. I know with my first experience with these types of gaskets I applied RTV in some corners. It wont hurt if you apply some RTV to those areas.
 

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When I recommend using a smear of RTV blue Permatex on these gaskets, whether it says dry or not, it is mostly to keep it in place. I have yet to have a problem with just a smear on any gasket (head gaskets is the only exception, they are dry unless copper, which can use either indian shellac or copper spray if one wants, I don't), it is simply good insurance. You aren't using lots and not making a gasket, just a little extra seal between zero tolerance.
 

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If you are using a Perm-a-dry, use only a dab of sealant at those seams you mention. IIRC this is a rubbery silicone 1 piece gasket and any sealant may make it so slippery, the gasket will squash out between the bolts and could leak. Use the clips they provide to hold the pan and gasket in-place while you go around and tighten the bolts gradually, alternating sides. Then remove the clips and install the remaining bolts. That gasket is very good and the clips simplify the job to make it almost foolproof. Be sure the mating surfaces are bone dry for the gasket to hold in-place.
 
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