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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Good verification. This indicates that fuse M1 in the TIPM is good. When the brake pedal is depressed, the brake light plunger extends. Terminal 5 power from fuse M1 is connected to terminal 6 and onto the rear center high mounted stop lamp and onto a connector at the TIPM.

And I believe you indicated that when the brake pedal is depressed, the left rear and right rear brake lamps turn on? Is this correct?

If YES then the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to activate the brake lamps and the circuit through the brake light switch for controlling the brake lamps is functioning properly. So that circuit can be eliminated as a source of the issue.



Since the adoption of drive by wire (electronic throttle control; no mechanical cable connection between accelerator pedal and throttle butterfly) the cruise control hardware has been simplified. Since you are able to drive the vehicle and the throttle works correctly, you know that the PCM is able to control the stepper motor at the throttle body and open and close the throttle butterfly valve.

Because the PCM has detected a brake sense signal circuit 1 problem, it is disabling the cruise control feature for safety reasons. If the P0572 code can be eliminated then the cruise control function will return.



In a recent post you mentioned hearing a constant clicking sound coming from the area of the transmission selector lever. I believe that the wireless control module is receiving false signals and applying a constant duty cycle to that transmission shift lever unlock solenoid. That is it is rapidly energizing and de-energizing the solenoid. Maybe the wireless control module is recognizing the rapid cycling and disabling cycling control to protect the solenoid? This solenoid is probably designed for intermittent duty and not constant duty. (This is a BIG guess!)

Next step is to check the ground terminal at the brake light switch. I believe it is terminal 2. Look for a wire that is black with red tracer or solid black. I have found some inconsistencies in wiring diagrams with wire colors so I am not sure. But I believe the ground wire is black with red tracer. Use a 12 volt test lamp and touch one lead to 12 volt power and the other to terminal 2 (black / red tracer wire). The test lamp bulb should illuminate brightly. If NO illumination there is an open ground circuit problem. If the bulb is dim then there is excessive resistance in the circuit to ground location G300. Report back.

Does anyone know where ground G300 is located? My resources are limited and I am not sure. Is G300 grounded on the floor under the driver's feet? Grounded to the left cowl? Grounded to the steering column? If there is a poor ground / no ground at the brake light switch terminal 2 then the location will need to be determined.
i did not mean to say constant clicking. Just a few inconsistent slow clicking sounds. nothing consistent. nothing i can make happen
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Good verification. This indicates that fuse M1 in the TIPM is good. When the brake pedal is depressed, the brake light plunger extends. Terminal 5 power from fuse M1 is connected to terminal 6 and onto the rear center high mounted stop lamp and onto a connector at the TIPM.

And I believe you indicated that when the brake pedal is depressed, the left rear and right rear brake lamps turn on? Is this correct?

If YES then the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to activate the brake lamps and the circuit through the brake light switch for controlling the brake lamps is functioning properly. So that circuit can be eliminated as a source of the issue.



Since the adoption of drive by wire (electronic throttle control; no mechanical cable connection between accelerator pedal and throttle butterfly) the cruise control hardware has been simplified. Since you are able to drive the vehicle and the throttle works correctly, you know that the PCM is able to control the stepper motor at the throttle body and open and close the throttle butterfly valve.

Because the PCM has detected a brake sense signal circuit 1 problem, it is disabling the cruise control feature for safety reasons. If the P0572 code can be eliminated then the cruise control function will return.



In a recent post you mentioned hearing a constant clicking sound coming from the area of the transmission selector lever. I believe that the wireless control module is receiving false signals and applying a constant duty cycle to that transmission shift lever unlock solenoid. That is it is rapidly energizing and de-energizing the solenoid. Maybe the wireless control module is recognizing the rapid cycling and disabling cycling control to protect the solenoid? This solenoid is probably designed for intermittent duty and not constant duty. (This is a BIG guess!)

Next step is to check the ground terminal at the brake light switch. I believe it is terminal 2. Look for a wire that is black with red tracer or solid black. I have found some inconsistencies in wiring diagrams with wire colors so I am not sure. But I believe the ground wire is black with red tracer. Use a 12 volt test lamp and touch one lead to 12 volt power and the other to terminal 2 (black / red tracer wire). The test lamp bulb should illuminate brightly. If NO illumination there is an open ground circuit problem. If the bulb is dim then there is excessive resistance in the circuit to ground location G300. Report back.

Does anyone know where ground G300 is located? My resources are limited and I am not sure. Is G300 grounded on the floor under the driver's feet? Grounded to the left cowl? Grounded to the steering column? If there is a poor ground / no ground at the brake light switch terminal 2 then the location will need to be determined.
I checked J6 J7 J18 M1 M14 M18 M20 M27 M28 was going to check M33 and M37 but fuse puller broke will have to wait until i get home and get a needle nose. checked with ohmeter all are good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Good verification. This indicates that fuse M1 in the TIPM is good. When the brake pedal is depressed, the brake light plunger extends. Terminal 5 power from fuse M1 is connected to terminal 6 and onto the rear center high mounted stop lamp and onto a connector at the TIPM.

And I believe you indicated that when the brake pedal is depressed, the left rear and right rear brake lamps turn on? Is this correct?

If YES then the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to activate the brake lamps and the circuit through the brake light switch for controlling the brake lamps is functioning properly. So that circuit can be eliminated as a source of the issue.



Since the adoption of drive by wire (electronic throttle control; no mechanical cable connection between accelerator pedal and throttle butterfly) the cruise control hardware has been simplified. Since you are able to drive the vehicle and the throttle works correctly, you know that the PCM is able to control the stepper motor at the throttle body and open and close the throttle butterfly valve.

Because the PCM has detected a brake sense signal circuit 1 problem, it is disabling the cruise control feature for safety reasons. If the P0572 code can be eliminated then the cruise control function will return.



In a recent post you mentioned hearing a constant clicking sound coming from the area of the transmission selector lever. I believe that the wireless control module is receiving false signals and applying a constant duty cycle to that transmission shift lever unlock solenoid. That is it is rapidly energizing and de-energizing the solenoid. Maybe the wireless control module is recognizing the rapid cycling and disabling cycling control to protect the solenoid? This solenoid is probably designed for intermittent duty and not constant duty. (This is a BIG guess!)

Next step is to check the ground terminal at the brake light switch. I believe it is terminal 2. Look for a wire that is black with red tracer or solid black. I have found some inconsistencies in wiring diagrams with wire colors so I am not sure. But I believe the ground wire is black with red tracer. Use a 12 volt test lamp and touch one lead to 12 volt power and the other to terminal 2 (black / red tracer wire). The test lamp bulb should illuminate brightly. If NO illumination there is an open ground circuit problem. If the bulb is dim then there is excessive resistance in the circuit to ground location G300. Report back.

Does anyone know where ground G300 is located? My resources are limited and I am not sure. Is G300 grounded on the floor under the driver's feet? Grounded to the left cowl? Grounded to the steering column? If there is a poor ground / no ground at the brake light switch terminal 2 then the location will need to be determined.

all 3 lights in rear for brake work, when brake pedal is depressed
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Good verification. This indicates that fuse M1 in the TIPM is good. When the brake pedal is depressed, the brake light plunger extends. Terminal 5 power from fuse M1 is connected to terminal 6 and onto the rear center high mounted stop lamp and onto a connector at the TIPM.

And I believe you indicated that when the brake pedal is depressed, the left rear and right rear brake lamps turn on? Is this correct?

If YES then the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to activate the brake lamps and the circuit through the brake light switch for controlling the brake lamps is functioning properly. So that circuit can be eliminated as a source of the issue.



Since the adoption of drive by wire (electronic throttle control; no mechanical cable connection between accelerator pedal and throttle butterfly) the cruise control hardware has been simplified. Since you are able to drive the vehicle and the throttle works correctly, you know that the PCM is able to control the stepper motor at the throttle body and open and close the throttle butterfly valve.

Because the PCM has detected a brake sense signal circuit 1 problem, it is disabling the cruise control feature for safety reasons. If the P0572 code can be eliminated then the cruise control function will return.



In a recent post you mentioned hearing a constant clicking sound coming from the area of the transmission selector lever. I believe that the wireless control module is receiving false signals and applying a constant duty cycle to that transmission shift lever unlock solenoid. That is it is rapidly energizing and de-energizing the solenoid. Maybe the wireless control module is recognizing the rapid cycling and disabling cycling control to protect the solenoid? This solenoid is probably designed for intermittent duty and not constant duty. (This is a BIG guess!)

Next step is to check the ground terminal at the brake light switch. I believe it is terminal 2. Look for a wire that is black with red tracer or solid black. I have found some inconsistencies in wiring diagrams with wire colors so I am not sure. But I believe the ground wire is black with red tracer. Use a 12 volt test lamp and touch one lead to 12 volt power and the other to terminal 2 (black / red tracer wire). The test lamp bulb should illuminate brightly. If NO illumination there is an open ground circuit problem. If the bulb is dim then there is excessive resistance in the circuit to ground location G300. Report back.

Does anyone know where ground G300 is located? My resources are limited and I am not sure. Is G300 grounded on the floor under the driver's feet? Grounded to the left cowl? Grounded to the steering column? If there is a poor ground / no ground at the brake light switch terminal 2 then the location will need to be determined.
I may have introduced another problem. I was checking the fuses with Acc power on. Now that i have it all back together.
The AbS light is on steady. when acc or when running. So this is new
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
The brake switch is actually 3 switches in one.
1) The rear brake lamps get power when pressing the pedal and not have power with your foot off the pedal.
2) The cruise control should lose power when pressing the pedal, but get power when your foot is off the pedal.
3) The PCM should see a ground signal when pressing the pedal, but not see a ground with your foot off the pedal.
Where is M7 supposed to go, there are 2 options?
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Regarding the P1797 fault code, I think this is the same component I've been having intermittent problems with on our Journey (62TE transmission). It's not a neutral safety switch, but is now referred to as the TRS (Transmission Range Sensor). Unfortunately, it is deep inside the transmission requiring the pan dropped and valve body removed to access. Probably looking at 2-3 hours labor at over $100/hour (maybe more).

I would advise having a properly equipped shop or dealership confirm the diagnosis first. Mine has never been hard to get out of park. I just had no start issues. Whenever the no start situation occurred I could move the gear select to neutral and it would start up. Your symptoms sound more like a hardware or physical problem - maybe a brake interlock problem or a dragging parking pawl? Perhaps the parking pawl has been damaged? Again, I recommend a competent shop or dealer to do diagnostics - plan on an hours labor charge.

I'm not sure if the ECS is related or not. My Journey owners manual indicates if the ESP (Electronic Stability Program) light is on (other than at start up momentarily) a malfunction has been detected.

The ECS/ESP button you refer to allows you to partially turn off the electronic stability control. The ESP (or in your case ECS) light will be on to indicate this. Consult your owners manual.
I cannot trust the dealerships in my area. I drive taxi and a taxi driver is the last person they want to help. The reason is because all the taxi drivers before me always would go to dealer, get the diagnostics done and find the problem and take it to their personal mechanic to fix it. so far, i have had 2 bad experiences with dealerships close to me.
 

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I cannot trust the dealerships in my area. I drive taxi and a taxi driver is the last person they want to help. The reason is because all the taxi drivers before me always would go to dealer, get the diagnostics done and find the problem and take it to their personal mechanic to fix it. so far, i have had 2 bad experiences with dealerships close to me.
Please note I said "properly equipped shop or dealership". The choice is yours. The problem you may run into is not all independent shops may have the diagnostic tools at its disposal that a dealership will have. YMMV.
 

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, , , , but, what if the cruise control is not working?
Read my post at 12:55 pm Tuesday, Mar 14. When the problem is corrected that is setting code P0572, then the cruise control feature will start to work again.

. . . I checked J6 J7 J18 M1 M14 M18 M20 M27 M28 was going to check M33 and M37 but fuse puller broke will have to wait until i get home and get a needle nose. checked with ohmeter all are good. . . .
Very good to know. Continue to check remaining fuses.

. . . . all 3 lights in rear for brake work, when brake pedal is depressed
Very good. We now know definitely that the stop lamp circuit terminals 5 & 6 on the brake light switch are functioning properly. Center high mounted brake lamp illuminates and the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to illuminate / turn on the rear brake lamps.

. . . . I may have introduced another problem. I was checking the fuses with Acc power on. Now that i have it all back together. The AbS light is on steady. when acc or when running. So this is new
On the underneath side of the TIPM cover there is a legend that identifies all fuses, relays, etc and their location. Did you replace fuse M37? That controls power to ABS. In the dropbox folder that I posted at 9:59 pm on Monday, Mar 13 I added a file to the folder named Fuses M7 M37. Look at it and I highlighted where these fuses are located. Fuse M7 has only 1 location; not 2. I also show where the 12 volt power input to the TIPM is located.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Read my post at 12:55 pm Tuesday, Mar 14. When the problem is corrected that is setting code P0572, then the cruise control feature will start to work again.



Very good to know. Continue to check remaining fuses.



Very good. We now know definitely that the stop lamp circuit terminals 5 & 6 on the brake light switch are functioning properly. Center high mounted brake lamp illuminates and the TIPM is receiving the proper signal to illuminate / turn on the rear brake lamps.



On the underneath side of the TIPM cover there is a legend that identifies all fuses, relays, etc and their location. Did you replace fuse M37? That controls power to ABS. In the dropbox folder that I posted at 9:59 pm on Monday, Mar 13 I added a file to the folder named Fuses M7 M37. Look at it and I highlighted where these fuses are located. Fuse M7 has only 1 location; not 2. I also show where the 12 volt power input to the TIPM is located.
Yes, I printed it out and was using it to check the fuses. I did not replace any fuses but I checked J6 J7 J18 M1 M14 M18 M20 M28 AND WAS GOING TO CHECK M33 AND M37 BUT FUSE PULLER BROKE. I will check it tomorrow. However, the M37 controls the fuel pump, I would think if it was bad then there would be other issues. Regarding the returning P0572, I found out late tonight that the brake switch had come loose and I found this because my brake lights were stuck on when I was getting ready to load at the terminal at DFW. I pressed the pedal and rotated the switch and put it back in and the ABS light went off. There is still a problem with the cruise control. It does not work. I never use it, I just do not want it to cause problems for other circuits. I did not get to drive it enough to see if the issue is still there with the transmission,, I sure hope that it has cleared up because the transmission is my biggest concern.
 

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Continue with checking fuses for continuity.

Have you checked the fluid level in the automatic transmission? Incorrect fluid level (too high or too low) can cause heat buildup. There is a temperature sensor in the automatic transmission that monitors fluid temperature. Fluid that gets excessively hot can force the transmission controller to change the shift pattern and this is noticeable. Insufficient can cause delayed starts and engagement of clutches.

Look under the transmission at the pan. There are numerous bolts (about 14 - 16) that attach the pan to the aluminum case. Are there any signs of fluid leakage? Check the 2 flexible hoses that run from the side of the transmission that faces the radiator to the transmission cooler. There is probably a cooler in the radiator header tank and there may be an air to fluid heat exchanger in front of the radiator and A/C condenser. Make sure the transmission cooler hoses connections are clean, tight and show no signs of leakage. Are there leaks where the left front and right front axle shafts extend into the sides of the transmission? If there are any signs of leakage then the transmission could be low on fluid.

This is a link to an article on Allpar.com that describes how to check transmission fluid level.

The Chrysler 62TE automatic transmission (transaxle) (at http://www.allpar.com/mopar/transmissions/62TE.html )

The 62TE has a very short dipstick tube and was not intended for DIY owners to check the fluid. It very well might have a sealing cap on the end of the dipstick tube to prevent tampering. Scroll through the article and read about checking fluid level. There is a chart which needs to be consulted. You have to know the temperature of the fluid and then find the correct fluid level at that temperature. The author suggests using a short piece of old speedometer cable to check fluid level. You can use your engine oil dipstick also as a measuring device. Wipe it clean of engine oil, insert it into short filler tube. When it hits bottom of pan (you can tell by clunk) extract it and use tape measure to get fluid level depth.
 

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I had a P0572 code on my 2007 Magnum that persisted through a brake switch replacement. After I replaced the switch, the code was intermittent just like it was before the replacement.
The code finally disappeared forever when I replaced the PCM for a non-start issue. This is why it really needs diagnosed, there can be several causes. For the Magnum the 7 manual listed 6 causes for the P0572 code, ranging from the switch itself to the PCM.
 
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Continue with checking fuses for continuity.

Have you checked the fluid level in the automatic transmission? Incorrect fluid level (too high or too low) can cause heat buildup. There is a temperature sensor in the automatic transmission that monitors fluid temperature. Fluid that gets excessively hot can force the transmission controller to change the shift pattern and this is noticeable. Insufficient can cause delayed starts and engagement of clutches.

Look under the transmission at the pan. There are numerous bolts (about 14 - 16) that attach the pan to the aluminum case. Are there any signs of fluid leakage? Check the 2 flexible hoses that run from the side of the transmission that faces the radiator to the transmission cooler. There is probably a cooler in the radiator header tank and there may be an air to fluid heat exchanger in front of the radiator and A/C condenser. Make sure the transmission cooler hoses connections are clean, tight and show no signs of leakage. Are there leaks where the left front and right front axle shafts extend into the sides of the transmission? If there are any signs of leakage then the transmission could be low on fluid.

This is a link to an article on Allpar.com that describes how to check transmission fluid level.

The Chrysler 62TE automatic transmission (transaxle) (at http://www.allpar.com/mopar/transmissions/62TE.html )

The 62TE has a very short dipstick tube and was not intended for DIY owners to check the fluid. It very well might have a sealing cap on the end of the dipstick tube to prevent tampering. Scroll through the article and read about checking fluid level. There is a chart which needs to be consulted. You have to know the temperature of the fluid and then find the correct fluid level at that temperature. The author suggests using a short piece of old speedometer cable to check fluid level. You can use your engine oil dipstick also as a measuring device. Wipe it clean of engine oil, insert it into short filler tube. When it hits bottom of pan (you can tell by clunk) extract it and use tape measure to get fluid level depth.
the transmission has a short dipstick? The one I have is long except for the end of it where it reads up to 100 i think. mine is at 70.
should it be at 50?
here is a link to the video i put on you tube that shows my dipstick.
View: https://youtu.be/203yWKLoEVs
 

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Go to the linked article I posted at 2:09 am on Wednesday, Mar 15. Scroll through the document and find the reference to a chart showing fluid level that shows transmission fluid level at various operating temperatures. I have repeated some of the chart information below.

Deg F Min level Max level

70 3 mm 1/8 in 14 mm 1/2 in

75 3.5 mm 1/8 in 16 mm 5/8 in

80 4mm 5/32 in 19 mm 3/4 in

200 40mm 1 9/16 in 54mm 2 1/8 in

Procedure to check transmission fluid level.

Make sure vehicle is on level surface.

Set parking brake firmly.

Start engine and let idle in PARK position.

Move selector lever through all positions:
R, N, D and pause for a few seconds in each position.
Return selector to PARK position. Let engine idle for 2
minutes. Wipe dipstick clean. Insert dipstick into filler
opening and withdraw. Measure distance from tip to fluid
level on dipstick. Compare to chart.

The factory service manual indicates to use a scan tool and
read the transmission fluid temperature from the tool. You
do not have access to such information so use this work around.

Hopefully your van has an outside temperature display somewhere
on the overhead console or in the instrument panel. Check the fluid
level first thing in the morning before you start your days activities.
Start the engine and note the outside temperature display. Use that
reading in the chart to determine fluid level. Follow the procedure
and measure.

If the vehicle has been sitting and not operated for several hours, fluid
drains and returns to the pan. You will get an excessively high reading
(you indicated 70 mm) but that is misleading. Fluid level must be
checked with engine running and is temperature dependent. Aim to
get the fluid level exactly between the minimum and maximum level.
Do not overfill.
This can cause foaming and excessive heat buildup
and is detrimental to transmission longevity

Do not get in a hurry with checking and adding fluid if it seems low. Add a little
fluid and then perform the procedure again tomorrow morning. When the
fluid is cold / cool it is very easy to panic and think it is too and add too much.
Several iterations over a number of days will get it set correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Go to the linked article I posted at 2:09 am on Wednesday, Mar 15. Scroll through the document and find the reference to a chart showing fluid level that shows transmission fluid level at various operating temperatures. I have repeated some of the chart information below.

Deg F Min level Max level

70 3 mm 1/8 in 14 mm 1/2 in

75 3.5 mm 1/8 in 16 mm 5/8 in

80 4mm 5/32 in 19 mm 3/4 in

200 40mm 1 9/16 in 54mm 2 1/8 in

Procedure to check transmission fluid level.

Make sure vehicle is on level surface.

Set parking brake firmly.

Start engine and let idle in PARK position.

Move selector lever through all positions:
R, N, D and pause for a few seconds in each position.
Return selector to PARK position. Let engine idle for 2
minutes. Wipe dipstick clean. Insert dipstick into filler
opening and withdraw. Measure distance from tip to fluid
level on dipstick. Compare to chart.

The factory service manual indicates to use a scan tool and
read the transmission fluid temperature from the tool. You
do not have access to such information so use this work around.

Hopefully your van has an outside temperature display somewhere
on the overhead console or in the instrument panel. Check the fluid
level first thing in the morning before you start your days activities.
Start the engine and note the outside temperature display. Use that
reading in the chart to determine fluid level. Follow the procedure
and measure.

If the vehicle has been sitting and not operated for several hours, fluid
drains and returns to the pan. You will get an excessively high reading
(you indicated 70 mm) but that is misleading. Fluid level must be
checked with engine running and is temperature dependent. Aim to
get the fluid level exactly between the minimum and maximum level.
Do not overfill.
This can cause foaming and excessive heat buildup
and is detrimental to transmission longevity

Do not get in a hurry with checking and adding fluid if it seems low. Add a little
fluid and then perform the procedure again tomorrow morning. When the
fluid is cold / cool it is very easy to panic and think it is too and add too much.
Several iterations over a number of days will get it set correctly.
Great Information. thank you so much. I do have outside display temp reading and i do check the fluid with everything to operating temp. i just have never done this thourough of a check. i cannot wait to try it.
i did get the temp/ level chart with the stick. i just did not know the exact level that it should be.

i still have an chime that comes on as soon as i turn power on but, i will address that next. i want to take care of the tranny first and foremost. You are awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Go to the linked article I posted at 2:09 am on Wednesday, Mar 15. Scroll through the document and find the reference to a chart showing fluid level that shows transmission fluid level at various operating temperatures. I have repeated some of the chart information below.

Deg F Min level Max level

70 3 mm 1/8 in 14 mm 1/2 in

75 3.5 mm 1/8 in 16 mm 5/8 in

80 4mm 5/32 in 19 mm 3/4 in

200 40mm 1 9/16 in 54mm 2 1/8 in

Procedure to check transmission fluid level.

Make sure vehicle is on level surface.

Set parking brake firmly.

Start engine and let idle in PARK position.

Move selector lever through all positions:
R, N, D and pause for a few seconds in each position.
Return selector to PARK position. Let engine idle for 2
minutes. Wipe dipstick clean. Insert dipstick into filler
opening and withdraw. Measure distance from tip to fluid
level on dipstick. Compare to chart.

The factory service manual indicates to use a scan tool and
read the transmission fluid temperature from the tool. You
do not have access to such information so use this work around.

Hopefully your van has an outside temperature display somewhere
on the overhead console or in the instrument panel. Check the fluid
level first thing in the morning before you start your days activities.
Start the engine and note the outside temperature display. Use that
reading in the chart to determine fluid level. Follow the procedure
and measure.

If the vehicle has been sitting and not operated for several hours, fluid
drains and returns to the pan. You will get an excessively high reading
(you indicated 70 mm) but that is misleading. Fluid level must be
checked with engine running and is temperature dependent. Aim to
get the fluid level exactly between the minimum and maximum level.
Do not overfill.
This can cause foaming and excessive heat buildup
and is detrimental to transmission longevity

Do not get in a hurry with checking and adding fluid if it seems low. Add a little
fluid and then perform the procedure again tomorrow morning. When the
fluid is cold / cool it is very easy to panic and think it is too and add too much.
Several iterations over a number of days will get it set correctly.

One thing i have failed to mention, the three times that i myself have change the fluid and filter, i have not replaced the seal although i have it, i was afraid to damage something if i tried to get it out. it is in there tight. any ideas on this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
o to the linked article I posted at 2:09 am on Wednesday, Mar 15. Scroll through the document and find the reference to a chart showing fluid level that shows transmission fluid level at various operating temperatures. I have repeated some of the chart information below.

Deg F Min level Max level

70 3 mm 1/8 in 14 mm 1/2 in

75 3.5 mm 1/8 in 16 mm 5/8 in

80 4mm 5/32 in 19 mm 3/4 in

200 40mm 1 9/16 in 54mm 2 1/8 in

Procedure to check transmission fluid level.

Make sure vehicle is on level surface.

Set parking brake firmly.

Start engine and let idle in PARK position.

Move selector lever through all positions:
R, N, D and pause for a few seconds in each position.
Return selector to PARK position. Let engine idle for 2
minutes. Wipe dipstick clean. Insert dipstick into filler
opening and withdraw. Measure distance from tip to fluid
level on dipstick. Compare to chart.

The factory service manual indicates to use a scan tool and
read the transmission fluid temperature from the tool. You
do not have access to such information so use this work around.

Hopefully your van has an outside temperature display somewhere
on the overhead console or in the instrument panel. Check the fluid
level first thing in the morning before you start your days activities.
Start the engine and note the outside temperature display. Use that
reading in the chart to determine fluid level. Follow the procedure
and measure.

If the vehicle has been sitting and not operated for several hours, fluid
drains and returns to the pan. You will get an excessively high reading
(you indicated 70 mm) but that is misleading. Fluid level must be
checked with engine running and is temperature dependent. Aim to
get the fluid level exactly between the minimum and maximum level.
Do not overfill.
This can cause foaming and excessive heat buildup
and is detrimental to transmission longevity

Do not get in a hurry with checking and adding fluid if it seems low. Add a little
fluid and then perform the procedure again tomorrow morning. When the
fluid is cold / cool it is very easy to panic and think it is too and add too much.
Several iterations over a number of days will get it set correctly.
ok, at 82 degrees with engine cold reads at 80mm
at 82 degrees with engine at 212 degrees,.
it reads 75 mm

i cannot check other outside temps until it changes, , but i think it is a little high
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Go to the linked article I posted at 2:09 am on Wednesday, Mar 15. Scroll through the document and find the reference to a chart showing fluid level that shows transmission fluid level at various operating temperatures. I have repeated some of the chart information below.

Deg F Min level Max level

70 3 mm 1/8 in 14 mm 1/2 in

75 3.5 mm 1/8 in 16 mm 5/8 in

80 4mm 5/32 in 19 mm 3/4 in

200 40mm 1 9/16 in 54mm 2 1/8 in

Procedure to check transmission fluid level.

Make sure vehicle is on level surface.

Set parking brake firmly.

Start engine and let idle in PARK position.

Move selector lever through all positions:
R, N, D and pause for a few seconds in each position.
Return selector to PARK position. Let engine idle for 2
minutes. Wipe dipstick clean. Insert dipstick into filler
opening and withdraw. Measure distance from tip to fluid
level on dipstick. Compare to chart.

The factory service manual indicates to use a scan tool and
read the transmission fluid temperature from the tool. You
do not have access to such information so use this work around.

Hopefully your van has an outside temperature display somewhere
on the overhead console or in the instrument panel. Check the fluid
level first thing in the morning before you start your days activities.
Start the engine and note the outside temperature display. Use that
reading in the chart to determine fluid level. Follow the procedure
and measure.

If the vehicle has been sitting and not operated for several hours, fluid
drains and returns to the pan. You will get an excessively high reading
(you indicated 70 mm) but that is misleading. Fluid level must be
checked with engine running and is temperature dependent. Aim to
get the fluid level exactly between the minimum and maximum level.
Do not overfill.
This can cause foaming and excessive heat buildup
and is detrimental to transmission longevity

Do not get in a hurry with checking and adding fluid if it seems low. Add a little
fluid and then perform the procedure again tomorrow morning. When the
fluid is cold / cool it is very easy to panic and think it is too and add too much.
Several iterations over a number of days will get it set correctly.

On your chart you indicate temp, that is engine temp and at 82 is at 80mm
with engine temp ay 212 then it should be closer to 50mm. i say it is overfilled but a quart ? 2 quarts?
 

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. . . .i still have an chime that comes on as soon as i turn power on but, i will address that next. i want to take care of the tranny first and foremost. You are awesome. . . .
On Chrysler vehicles, you will get a repeating chime for 5 - 6 second when ignition is first turned to ON / RUN and the driver side seat belt is not latched. The chime stops when you fasten the seat belt or the 5 - 6 second interval passes. After this and you put the vehicle into motion and the BCM (body control module) senses that any door or lift gate is not closed properly, a chime will sound. If this happens you would have a door ajar icon lamp illuminated on the instrument panel. If none of these preceding situations occurs or has been corrected and you still get a single chime sound, that is usually a signal that there are active diagnostic codes in the PCM (check engine lamp may or may NOT be illuminated). And if a pending diagnostic code has happened and is on its way to maturation as an active code, a single chime will sound. So let's get all the diagnostic code conditions remedied and removed, and this single chime sound should disappear.

. . . . One thing i have failed to mention, the three times that i myself have change the fluid and filter, i have not replaced the seal although i have it, i was afraid to damage something if i tried to get it out. it is in there tight. any ideas on this?
I believe you are referencing the seal that is recessed into the opening in the transmission that the nipple on the filter assembly inserts. You are wise in not forcing the situation. The transmission case is aluminum which is soft metal and can be gouged. Use a pick type tool (similar to the instrument a dentist uses to scrape tartar from teeth) to remove the seal. Here is a link to such a tool.

Performance Tool W942 - Hook/Pic Set | O'Reilly Auto Parts (at http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/PFM0/W942/N0722.oap?ck=Search_seal+pick_N0722_1420243_149&keyword=seal+pick&pt=N0722&ppt=C0374 )

. . . On your chart you indicate temp, that is engine temp and at 82 is at 80mm with engine temp ay 212 then it should be closer to 50mm. i say it is overfilled but a quart ? 2 quarts?
The numbers I posted tend to run together and make it difficult to read.
At 70 Deg F temperature, minimum level is 3 mm; max level is 14 mm.
At 80 Deg F temperature, min level is 4 mm; max level is 19 mm.
At 200 Deg F temperature, min level is 40 mm; max level is 54 mm.

The temperature used in the chart is transmission fluid temperature; NOT engine temperature. At 212 deg F engine temperature, fluid temperature should be 180 - 190. 200+ degree transmission fluid temperature is too high and leads to fluid degradation and internal seal damage.

So if you are following the procedure exactly to the letter, letting the vehicle sit overnight so that engine and transmission temperature cool and reach ambient / outside / surrounding air temperature. Then you start the engine, move selector through all positions (P, R, N, D) and then let it idle for 2 minutes. I believe the transmission is overfilled! It is probably overfilled by 1 to 1.5 quarts.

Remove some of the fluid through the fluid fill tube. There are hand held vacuum devices for fluid extraction. A simpler, less expensive solution is available. If you have a turkey baster in the kitchen dedicate it to automotive duty. (Please buy a NEW one for kitchen service!) Go to a home improvement center such as Lowes, Home Depot or Ace Hardware and buy clear vinyl tubing, 1 foot length, in the appropriate size to fit the end of the turkey baster. Insert the baster with extension vinyl into the dipstick tube. Suction excess fluid and measure. Extract about 1.5 quarts.

Follow the procedure for checking fluid level with cold engine and vehicle at ambient / surrounding temperature. Your fluid level reading at 80 deg F fluid temperature (not engine temperature) should be between 4mm and 19 mm so I would adjust to get a level at 10 - 11 mm.

It is difficult to get an exact fluid temperature unless you can use a sophisticated scan tool that gives this information. Some DIY scan tools ($100 - $500 price range) may provide this information. So if you do not have the particular equipment to retrieve transmission fluid temperature from vehicle, how can you improvise?

A digital home thermometer with flexible probe might work. You clean the underneath side of the transmission pan, tape the probe to the pan and then activate the thermometer and read the temperature. You would need to leave the probe attached for 10 - 20 minutes to get an accurate reading. Of course the thermometer needs to have an upper range of at least 210 - 220 deg F to give correct information. If you have the old style, glass tube mercury thermometer for home health, do NOT use such a device. Those thermometers only had an upper range of 120 - 130 deg F and higher temperatures applied to the sensing bulb will cause the glass tube to crack and spill mercury.

Here is a link to a video that shows how to drain fluid, change filter and fill and check fluid on a Chrysler 62TE automatic transaxle. Of particular interest is the information and pictures presented at time interval 6:10 and beyond. Also the presenter shows actual levels on a dipstick and at interval 7:50 a picture of the chart.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYLlN0UFEyk
 
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