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Virginia Gentleman
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Discussion Starter #1
As some of you know my son is an avid baseball player and I've relayed his exploits during his HS senior year,

He's moved onto college. During his senior year he signed a national letter of intent to play for and attend Patrick Henry Community College in Martinsville, VA. He just completed his freshman year and thought I would post an update.

In the fall the Patriots played 17 games and posted a 14-3 record. Dylan played in 7 games and recorded 7 hits in 13 at-bats. The spring season was more intense with 56 games on the schedule with 49 games actually played - 7 were cancelled due to weather.

Dylan finished the season as the starting DH (designated hitter) and primary backup for 1B. In 43 games he had 33 hits in 109 at-bats for a .303 batting average. His on base percentage was .402 and his slugging percentage was .422. Of his 33 hits 7 were doubles and 2 were HR's. He also recorded 17 runs scored, 22 RBI's while drawing 13 walks and striking out 11 times. He was also hit-by-pitch 5 times.

Not bad for a freshman!

The Patriots finished the regular season with a 32-17 record overall, 19-11 in the conference, for 4th place in the Region X conference. They were the 5th place seed for the tournament. Pasco-Hernando college (FL) was the 3rd seed - they are the only DII school in Florida (the rest are D1's). In the tournament the Patriot's won game one with a hard fought 8-7 victory in 11 innings over SECC. But the next two games did not go well. Game 2 was a 9-3 loss to the #1 seed Catawba Valley followed by a 4-1 loss to Lenior CC. The team is currently en route home to Martinsville and my son will be home tomorrow. Despite the disappointment of losing in the tournament, it has been a good season. For the tournament Dylan was 2 for 9 with a double, run scored, 2 RBI's and 2 walks.

Below are a few pics. Enjoy!







 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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I admittedly don't know a lot about baseball, having grown up in a town that didn't get a professional team until I was in high school, but those sound like pretty good stats. Is he looking to play professionally, or is there an opportunity for a bigger school to look at him and to consider offering a scholarship based on his ability?

Sabermetrics, if they're employed in college-level teams for recruiting, might lead them to find him even if his team itself isn't winning too much. There's only so much that an individual player can do, but if he's the bright spot on offense even if the team isn't winning then that may be noticed.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Discussion Starter #3
TWX said:
I admittedly don't know a lot about baseball, having grown up in a town that didn't get a professional team until I was in high school, but those sound like pretty good stats. Is he looking to play professionally, or is there an opportunity for a bigger school to look at him and to consider offering a scholarship based on his ability?

Sabermetrics, if they're employed in college-level teams for recruiting, might lead them to find him even if his team itself isn't winning too much. There's only so much that an individual player can do, but if he's the bright spot on offense even if the team isn't winning then that may be noticed.
His long term dream is to play professionally, but we know the odds. According to what I've read, coming out of HS only 1 in 94 (1%) actually plays professionally (minors or majors) and only 1 in 10 play at the collegiate level. So he's beat one set of odds. Yes, his stats are good, but not great. College coaches don't read a lot into stats as statistically, it's too small of a window, but they do help.

The game plan is to contact coaches at the next level (4 yr DI & DII) and have them "scout" him this summer and fall - one reason he'll be playing legion ball. It's admittedly hard for them to see him in the spring season when they are coaching their own teams. It gets tricky as DI schools have to follow strict NCAA guidelines. DI's (the big schools - UVA, UNC, etc) typically have 11.7 scholarships per year on the baseball squad - and that's out of 35 on the squad. So not even half the team is on scholarships. DII's have slightly different guidelines. DIII's are not allowed to offer any athletic scholarships. At a DIII everybody is basically a "walk-on".

The good news is by going the JUCO (short for junior colleges) route, he gets a lot more playing time and many 4 yr schools prefer JUCO players as they are 1) ready to play, 2) already have experience dealing with academics and playing ball and 3) have experience playing at the collegiate level. At least compared to a HS player. At least 5-6 players on this years squad were scouted and signed letters of intent to play for DI's, DII's and NAIA schools. So there is the opportunity to move on.

Two of his HS teammates went the DIII route - one at Guilford College in NC (pitcher) and one at University of Mary Washington (catcher) in Fredericksburg. Neither had much playing time. My son had more hits than his teammate had at-bats at UMW. The pitcher is considering transferring to PHCC in hopes of getting more time on the mound. He and his parents have already visited with the coach and watched a game. Haven't heard of their decision yet. They paid $22K for him to go to Guilford while PHCC is about $1600 for 12 credit hours and about $5,000-$6,000 in living expenses.

With so many players fighting for scholarships, it really is cut throat out there.

If the professional option doesn't pan out, his "backup" plan is to earn a physical education degree and teaching certificate and become a teacher with the idea of becoming a coach.

And one more thing to think about - my son is only 1 year younger than Bryce Harper who signed with the Washington Nationals last year.
 

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DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
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At least he and you know what he's up against; being realistic is not very much fun, but it means having a backup plan if what one's primary interest is doesn't ultimately work out.

Academically what has he enjoyed and been good with? If, in order to coach, he has to be an academic teacher, it's good to teach something that one enjoys and is good at. By contrast I had a couple of teachers in high school that were coaches first and foremost and teachers secondarily, and since history and social studies have the least stringent requirements for academic success for the student those tended to be the subjects that the coaches ended up teaching. If he is in to another subject then it might well be good to focus on that subject so that he's more valuable as a coach that can actually teach, as opposed to one that gets thrown in where he'll do the least damage.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Discussion Starter #5
His plan was to basically become a phys ed teacher. And then eventually coach at the JV and varsity level. Most school districts (in our area) have policies that prefer having coaches (regardless of sport) come from the "staff" before they go outside. Not sure what subject(s) really interest him at this point. I know he is not fond of history or english.

The sad thing is there isn't much money in coaching at the HS level. For any head coach position at the local HS, it's only about $3,000/year stipend in addition to their teaching salary.
 

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Dylan has some very good stats, Doug. As long as he keeps up the hard work and dedication, there's no reason that he couldn't go pro. Just make sure he has a backup plan (good education) to go along with the ball playing. He seems to have his head on pretty straight, so I'm sure he's aware of that need too. I had a buddy in high school that was a great athelete and never concentrated on his education. He thought he'd be a pro baseball player. He had a terrible accident our senior year and ruined his left leg. Fortunately for Anthony, he had friends in the electricians union and he became an electrician. He still regrets drinking and driving and never being able to fulfill his desire to play ball.
 

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Virginia Gentleman
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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, he's done a good job keeping out of trouble while at college. One time in the fall and once in the spring quite a few baseball players were busted at a party where the cops were called. The cops didn't call the parents - they called the coach. Coach had those players run for a week and some lost their starting positions. Fortunately, Dylan was part of that mess.

In the fall there were 50+ players on the team. By the beginning of the spring season, it was down to about 40. About 10 quit due to grades, dissatisfaction with the coach or they found out it wasn't what they wanted or expected. Then he redshirted 5 for various reasons. So at the beginning of the spring season the roster was down to about 35. By the end of the season it was down to about 30. More quit as they weren't getting what they perceived as enough playing time. Even Dylan's roommate quit about 2 weeks from the end of the season. One thing I learned, it's not just about your skill level and ability, but attitude and perseverance as well. There are more distractions at the college level and you really have to focus on your goals and studies.

Sidenote - my 2nd daughter graduated from ODU Friday with a Bachelor of Science in Communications. Woo Hoo!
 

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Congratulations to your daughter. I got a B.S. degree from MTSU with a Mass Comm major and Management minor. Never really used either one except to run my own business for 13 years. The management minor did come in handy while working for Autozone. I schooled the store manager over and over on how to handle co-workers and disgruntled customers. Unfortunately for him, he didn't listen or learn!
 
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