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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
"Torque Converter Clutch Solenoid Circuit" Fluid is @ the right level and clean. This has happened 3 times in the last 8 months and only after reaching speeds over 80. Could it be the clutch solenoid? 41TE is what I think the trans is, 2003 GT Turbo with paddle (I think). Is this the only trans?
 

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According to the '03 Parts Catalog, the 41TE was the only auto trans for that year:

 

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I'm not going out on a limb and condemn the TCC solenoid. Solenoids are, basically fairly trouble-free. This will need more investigation and diagnosis, possibly road testing with a pressure gauge in view of the driver or tech. I have the gauge pinned under a wiper blade against the windshield. Watch TCC apply pressure for dropping below an engagement pressure.
The P0740 can also be caused by hydraulic and mechanical defects. I have replaced torque converters and front pump assemblies because of hydraulic leaks from hub wear. It can be electrical, but not often.
 

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I'm not going out on a limb and condemn the TCC solenoid. Solenoids are, basically fairly trouble-free. This will need more investigation and diagnosis, possibly road testing with a pressure gauge in view of the driver or tech. I have the gauge pinned under a wiper blade against the windshield. Watch TCC apply pressure for dropping below an engagement pressure.
The P0740 can also be caused by hydraulic and mechanical defects. I have replaced torque converters and front pump assemblies because of hydraulic leaks from hub wear. It can be electrical, but not often.
I tend to agree with I C that this is NOT an electrical problem. Code P0740 indicates that the PCM applies a certain duty cycle / pulsing of fluid pressure to the torque converter clutch. As a result the input shaft or engine speed is expected to be within a small tolerance or range of the vehicle speed. But that is not happening because of excess slippage in the TCC. If there was an electrical issue it would appear at lower speeds.

As vehicle velocity increases the coefficient of drag increases with the Mathematical SQUARE of velocity increase. So at high vehicle speed the TCC is allowing excessive clutch slippage. Wear in the transmission could be preventing the PCM from applying adequate clutch pressure to prevent slippage.
 

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I tend to agree with I C that this is NOT an electrical problem. Code P0740 indicates that the PCM applies a certain duty cycle / pulsing of fluid pressure to the torque converter clutch. As a result the input shaft or engine speed is expected to be within a small tolerance or range of the vehicle speed. But that is not happening because of excess slippage in the TCC. If there was an electrical issue it would appear at lower speeds.

As vehicle velocity increases the coefficient of drag increases with the Mathematical SQUARE of velocity increase. So at high vehicle speed the TCC is allowing excessive clutch slippage. Wear in the transmission could be preventing the PCM from applying adequate clutch pressure to prevent slippage.
You mention PCM for controlling the transmission, doesn't the '04 have a separate TCM (transmission control module)?

On my Gen2, they did away with the TCM and it is incorporated into the PCM.
 

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You noted the fluid was at the right level and clean. When was the last time the pan was dropped and the filter replaced? Sometimes 4 quarts of fresh atf+4 will cure a number of little issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I tend to agree with I C that this is NOT an electrical problem. Code P0740 indicates that the PCM applies a certain duty cycle / pulsing of fluid pressure to the torque converter clutch. As a result the input shaft or engine speed is expected to be within a small tolerance or range of the vehicle speed. But that is not happening because of excess slippage in the TCC. If there was an electrical issue it would appear at lower speeds.

As vehicle velocity increases the coefficient of drag increases with the Mathematical SQUARE of velocity increase. So at high vehicle speed the TCC is allowing excessive clutch slippage. Wear in the transmission could be preventing the PCM from applying adequate clutch pressure to prevent slippage.
Thank you for the input, makes sense, the code came up while going 75 up a slight incline in the same spot twice, I'm in Southern California and 75 is the norm or you get run over. I wonder if there is a way to get over this problem?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You noted the fluid was at the right level and clean. When was the last time the pan was dropped and the filter replaced? Sometimes 4 quarts of fresh atf+4 will cure a number of little issues.
Thanks for you input, bought the PT from my neighbor and was told the trans would not shift @ one time and Firestone changed the oil and filter, cleared the code as I do now and all is well until going up an incline over 70 MPH.
 

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Thanks for you input, bought the PT from my neighbor and was told the trans would not shift @ one time and Firestone changed the oil and filter, cleared the code as I do now and all is well until going up an incline over 70 MPH.
The scariest thing (and not necessarily related to this problem) is that Firestone may not have used the proper ATF+4 fluid.

Years ago, I sold a really nice New Yorker to a kid who took it to Firestone for tires after he had it a year or so. They talked him into a transmissions service (A604, the predecessor to your transmission), put the wrong fluid in, and destroyed the transmission. He ended up scrapping the car..
 

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The scariest thing (and not necessarily related to this problem) is that Firestone may not have used the proper ATF+4 fluid.

Years ago, I sold a really nice New Yorker to a kid who took it to Firestone for tires after he had it a year or so. They talked him into a transmissions service (A604, the predecessor to your transmission), put the wrong fluid in, and destroyed the transmission. He ended up scrapping the car..
Also, some shops use "chemicals" or "cleaners" when doing a system flush.

Chrysler does not recommend using any cleaning agents.

I've had my trans flushed several times, at dealerships, when they replace the filter, and the flush gets a nearly 100% fluid exchange.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Also, some shops use "chemicals" or "cleaners" when doing a system flush.

Chrysler does not recommend using any cleaning agents.

I've had my trans flushed several times, at dealerships, when they replace the filter, and the flush gets a nearly 100% fluid exchange.
Thanks again, I will take it to my mechanic and have the fluid changed, will need to be flushed to get the fluid out of the converter.
 

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The problem with a fluid transfusion (flushing) is that the old filter is still there, you don't know what is laying in the bottom of the pan along with what is stuck to the chip magnet.
Also the transfusion machines service many different vehicles all day long. Cross-contamination of Mercon/Dexron, etc fluids used in the machine previously bother me. At least, Chrysler dealer transfusion machines do (mostly) ATF+4 all day long.
The factory service manual still suggests a pan drop/filter change as 'the procedure'.
I suppose that if you wanted to get every last drop of old fluid out, you would begin by dropping the pan and changing the filter, then perform the exchange operation by a transfusion with pure ATF+4.
A poor-man's fluid transfusion service can be done by placing the output cooler hose in a drain bucket with the engine idling in Neutral (chock wheels and set parking brake for safety). Add fresh fluid through the inlet cooler hose. Some filling through the dipstick tube initially will keep the transmission pump primed and moving fluid. Air bubbles and foam can make the pump 'whirr'.
.
 

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The problem with a fluid transfusion (flushing) is that the old filter is still there, you don't know what is laying in the bottom of the pan along with what is stuck to the chip magnet.
Also the transfusion machines service many different vehicles all day long. Cross-contamination of Mercon/Dexron, etc fluids used in the machine previously bother me. At least, Chrysler dealer transfusion machines do (mostly) ATF+4 all day long.
The factory service manual still suggests a pan drop/filter change as 'the procedure'.
I suppose that if you wanted to get every last drop of old fluid out, you would begin by dropping the pan and changing the filter, then perform the exchange operation by a transfusion with pure ATF+4.
A poor-man's fluid transfusion service can be done by placing the output cooler hose in a drain bucket with the engine idling in Neutral (chock wheels and set parking brake for safety). Add fresh fluid through the inlet cooler hose. Some filling through the dipstick tube initially will keep the transmission pump primed and moving fluid. Air bubbles and foam can make the pump 'whirr'.
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That's when I've had the "flush" done, in conjunction with a filter change. :)

When shopping around for the service, not all dealerships are created equal. ;)

I had one dealership that wanted to charge me for a filter and fluid change at one price ($150). Then they would put the pan back on, and then remove it again to do the flush service at another price ($190). :eek:

I found another dealership that did the complete service (filter change, fluid change, system flush) and at one reasonable price ($155). :cool:
 

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I agree about price shopping with dealer service (and parts) departments. Chrysler can only suggest retail prices, but the dealers set their own prices.
When at the service desk, ask about coupons, service specials, 10% discounts for vets, seniors, etc. It never hurts to ask.
Shop policies/procedures and minimum/diagnostic charges should be explained before writing the work order. Read and sign the document.

One service advisor that I worked with kept a few coupons under the desk. He would offer them to sell a job to a hesitant customer or slip one quietly to a regular customer. He sold the work, where otherwise the customer would have declined. I liked working with this guy.
 

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I agree about price shopping with dealer service (and parts) departments. Chrysler can only suggest retail prices, but the dealers set their own prices.
When at the service desk, ask about coupons, service specials, 10% discounts for vets, seniors, etc. It never hurts to ask.
Shop policies/procedures and minimum/diagnostic charges should be explained before writing the work order. Read and sign the document.

One service advisor that I worked with kept a few coupons under the desk. He would offer them to sell a job to a hesitant customer or slip one quietly to a regular customer. He sold the work, where otherwise the customer would have declined. I liked working with this guy.
About 10 years ago the transmission cable on my Ram snapped. Also a check ball had come off the end of the cable (the initial problem). This required dropping the pan to access. Anyhew, the initial cost estimate was over $700 (mostly labor). While the service writer did not have any coupons, he was able to discount the service to about $500. As you posted, it never hurts to ask. It also helped that at the time I was still a somewhat regular customer.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
This is my PT and took it in yesterday to have the trans fluid changed, I made sure that all the fluid will be change as advised above, $290, one shop wanted $250 but had no idea what I wanted done as far as taking the hoses off and removing "all" the fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Getting the PT back today. As I said I took it to a good local shop, he explained the front cowling (2003) had to be taken off to get to the cooling lines, this is the only way to do the correct job. Mike had a computer that ran the pressures that were all in tolerance with 4th gear reading of 72 where 77 is the limit, can't remember the lower value but I think it was 55. Will post the readings later. Filter had clutch grindings hanging from it. Firestone didn't do a correct job, this is where my neighbor had taken in before I bought it.
 

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Getting the PT back today. As I said I took it to a good local shop, he explained the front cowling (2003) had to be taken off to get to the cooling lines, this is the only way to do the correct job. Mike had a computer that ran the pressures that were all in tolerance with 4th gear reading of 72 where 77 is the limit, can't remember the lower value but I think it was 55. Will post the readings later. Filter had clutch grindings hanging from it. Firestone didn't do a correct job, this is where my neighbor had taken in before I bought it.
It would have been nice if the shop had saved a sample of the old fluid that they removed, along with the filter and pics of the material in the pan.

It had been mentioned, in an earlier post, that the trans had been serviced at a Firestone shop, and there is the possibility that they did not use the correct fluid.

I know it may be a long shot, but if the wrong fluid had been put in the trans, and it can be attributed to their service work, if the trans is toast now, it may be worth your while to go back to them for some relief.

Of course, the person that had that original service work done would probably have to make any claim, and since you bought the car, you would have no standing, but the seller might help you out, under the circumstances.

Do you know how long ago Firestone serviced it?
 
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