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Chrysler LLC Press Release said:
2014 Ram Heavy Duty — The King of Capability Offers Exclusive Air Suspension and an All-new Best-in-class V-8 Engine
2014 Ram Heavy Duty retains the highest level of capability with best-in-class towing, best-in-class payload and best-in-class Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR)
Largest displacement V-8 in the segment, all-new 6.4-liter HEMI® delivers best-in-class power
2014 Ram 2500 Heavy Duty starts at $29,600, plus $1,095 destination; 6.4-liter HEMI option priced $1,495 greater than similarly equipped 5.7-liter HEMI-powered Ram
New engine offering opens the door to additional customers who are looking for a large gasoline powertrain at a great value
Two gas-powered options, plus manual and automatic transmission-equipped diesel powertrains offer customers a wide range of choices to meet their needs
Available 6.4-liter HEMI V-8 delivers best-in-class 410 horsepower (306 kW) at 5,600 rpm and 429 lb.-ft. of torque (582 N•m) at 4,000 rpm, and features VVT with Fuel Saver cylinder deactivation
Standard 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 delivers 383 horsepower (286 kW) at 5,600 rpm and 400 lb.-ft. of torque (542 N•m), and features variable-valve timing for greater efficiency and performance
Available 6.7-liter Cummins High-Output Turbo Diesel produces 385 horsepower (283 kW) at 2,800 rpm and best-in-class 850 lb.-ft. of torque (1,151 N•m)
Ram engineering continues to lead Heavy Duty segment innovation with Ram 2500 link coil rear suspension to deliver best-in-class ride
Exclusive factory rear air suspension for Ram 2500 and exclusive factory supplemental air suspension system for Ram 3500
New gooseneck/fifth wheel capability for Ram 2500
Ram PowerWagon increases capability with all-new 6.4-liter HEMI V-8 engine and new suspension
New best-in-class dual alternator systems up to 440 amps
New 18- and 20-inch wheel packages
Unsurpassed powertrain warranty – five years/100,000 miles – and best-in-class 15,000-mile oil change interval on the Cummins diesel engine
June 28, 2013 , Auburn Hills, Mich. - Ram Truck brand offers the most capable heavy-duty pickups in the segment – the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty line features a list of best-in-class titles in the segment's number one purchase reason, capability:
Towing – Up to 30,000 pounds with Ram 3500
Towing – Up to 17,940 pounds with Ram 2500
Payload – Up to 7,320 pounds with Ram 3500
Power – 850 lb.-ft. of torque with 6.7-liter Cummins
Power – 410 horsepower and 429 lb.-ft. of torque with all-new 6.4-liter HEMI V-8
Capacity – Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) of 37,600 pounds with Ram 3500
Pricing for the new 2014 Ram 2500 Heavy Duty starts at $29,600, plus $1,095 destination. The 6.4-liter HEMI option is priced $1,495 greater than a similarly equipped 5.7-liter HEMI-powered Ram Heavy Duty pickup and is the first gas engine available in the dual rear wheel 3500.

Ram 2500 and 3500 Heavy Duty trucks also add new innovation, including an all-new, 5-link coil suspension with optional air suspension on Ram 2500 and a supplemental air bag suspension option on Ram 3500.

ENGINEERING
Heavy-duty trucks generally have suspension equipped for constant, heavy payloads. This can result in a harsher ride when unloaded. Ram innovation leads again for 2014. The new Ram 2500 takes lessons learned from the Ram 1500 and adds an all-new, segment exclusive five-link coil rear suspension system for best-in-class ride and handling and new air suspension system.

The exclusive five-link coil design provides better articulation over obstacles than a leaf spring system and the robust coil springs are more than up to the task of handling the loads required of a Heavy Duty Ram 2500 — up to 17,940 pounds for towing.

The 2014 Ram 2500 also will offer a segment exclusive rear air suspension system. An air bag replaces the coil spring much like the Ram 1500. Load capacity is not sacrificed and the 2014 Ram 2500’s best-in-class ride and handling gets even better, crushing the competition with two doses of engineering innovation (five-link coil standard and air suspension option). Another benefit to the new air suspension design is the load-leveling capability, which automatically detects load on the rear suspension from a trailer or payload. The air pressure increases until the vehicle reaches normal ride height, leveling the truck, improving stability and loaded ride.

The Ram 3500 will continue to feature the rear Hotchkiss leaf spring system on the Ram 3500 but will now offer a supplemental air suspension system on SRW and DRW applications. By adding supplemental air bags to the rear suspension, Ram engineers were able to soften the leaf springs, allowing for more unladed suspension movement. When a high-load capacity condition exists, the air suspension automatically fills the rear air bags to level the truck to improve stability and ride quality — even pulling a best-in-class 30,000-lb. load.

In the front, the Ram Heavy Duty line features an advanced three-link front suspension to ensure roll stiffness. Greater roll stiffness, also known as body roll, is an important characteristic in taller vehicles and especially trucks with heavy payloads. Roll stiffness is measured by the amount the truck’s body tips side-to-side, independently of the wheels, during cornering.

For 2014 Ram 2500 offers gooseneck (center-positioned ball in the bed) or fifth wheel capability. Ram is unmatched in terms of offering the most complete ‘hitch ‘n go’ towing prep package found anywhere in the heavy-duty category. Additionally, Ram features an in-box connection junction, and a standard Class 4 and 5 receiver hitch with a four or seven pin connector on the bumper.

Ram offers two different dual alternator systems on the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty providing additional power for higher electrical loads from commercial vehicle upfits and accessories. New for 2014, Ram Heavy Duty models equipped with the Cummins 6.7-liter diesel engine will offer dual 220-amp alternators (best-in-class 440 amps). Both the Ram 2500 and 3500 equipped with the new 6.4-liter HEMI® V-8 gas engine also will offer a dual-alternator system – the first gas-driven application of its kind in either class – that combines 220- and 160-amp units for 380-amps of total best-in-class output.

Although the Ram Power Wagon benefits from the new five-link rear suspension, it also receives a unique front suspension system to maintain its leadership in off-road capability. The modified front three-link system incorporates high-movement links, allowing for additional flexibility and axle articulation. The 2014 Power Wagon also is powered by the all-new 6.4-liter HEMI V-8 engine, contributing to Ram Power Wagon’s title: the most capable production off-road truck in the industry.

POWERTRAIN
With Chrysler Group’s all-new 6.4-liter HEMI V-8, the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty will deliver to best-in-class horsepower and best-in-class torque among pickups with gasoline engines.

Engineered to deliver capability, durability and bang for the buck, the largest displacement V-8 in its class provides a worthy gas-powered option to the segment’s overall standard-bearer – the 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel.

Compelling numbers tell the story of the new 16-valve engine with 410 horsepower (306 kW) at 5,600 rpm and a peak torque rating of 429 lb.-ft. (582 N•m), at 4,000 rpm.

One of the enablers for such performance is an active dual-runner-length intake manifold optimized specifically for the Ram Heavy Duty lineup. The result is improved low-end torque without sacrificing high-end power.

The legendary HEMI architecture provides the foundation of the 90-degree V-8. But its advanced technology is decidedly forward-looking. Cooled exhaust-gas recirculation (CEGR), variable-valve timing (VVT) and Chrysler Group’s trademark Fuel Saver cylinder-deactivation technology all contribute to efficiency and help to capitalize on every cubic inch.

The new 6.4-liter HEMI is standard on the 66RFE six-speed automatic transmission.

Other engine options include the 5.7-liter HEMI V-8, standard equipment for the Ram 2500 and 3500 (SRW). The engine produces 383 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and generates peak torque of 400 lb.-ft. at 4,000 rpm. The 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 is mated to a 66RFE six-speed automatic transmission.

Dominating the torque charts, the renowned 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel I-6 is available in three versions. The first version is paired with Ram’s segment exclusive six-speed manual transmission, which features a wear-compensating clutch for lifetime like-new performance and a dual-trunion shift tower to accommodate a compact shift pattern. This combination delivers 350 horsepower at 2,800 rpm and 660 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,400 rpm. The second option matches the Cummins to the 68RFE six-speed automatic transmission. The diesel engine cranks out 370 horsepower at 2,800 rpm with an unsurpassed in ¾-ton trucks 800 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,600 rpm.

Finally, the 6.7-liter Cummins High-Output Turbo Diesel I-6 for Ram 3500 is paired with the Aisin six-speed automatic transmission (AS69RC), leaving no doubt to Ram Heavy Duty’s capability. In addition to 385 horsepower at 2,800 rpm, the most powerful Cummins, generates best-in-class torque of 850 lb.-ft. at 1,700 rpm. The AS69RC transmission features wide gear ratios that contribute to impressive shift performance, efficiency and drivability.

The Ram Heavy Duty also features another innovation, the industry-exclusive Ram Active Air intake system. When the intake system senses extreme heat, it draws cooler air from the front of the vehicle – a function that also engages at high altitudes for superior throttle response in low oxygen environments. When conditions are wet from snow, ice or water-fording, the system pulls air from an under-hood inlet, clear from snow packing and water. The 2014 Ram 3500 boasts a best-in-class GCWR. A contributor is the 11.8-inch rear axle matched with the high-output diesel engine boasting a 300-mm hypoid gear set, a 4-pinion helical differential and a cooling-fin equipped aluminum differential cover for optimal thermal management.

Two Borg-Warner part-time transfer cases are available on the 2014 Ram Heavy Duty. The BW 44-46 is an electric shifting part-time transfer case with 2WD, 4WD High, 4WD Low and Neutral. BW 44-47 is a manual shifting transfer case with 2WD, 4WD High, 4WD Low and Neutral. Both options feature a low-range ratio of 2.64 and locking differential from front to rear.

Low total cost of ownership and unsurpassed powertrain warranty – five years / 100,000 miles
Operating costs are of great consideration for owners who use their trucks for work. The 2014 Ram Heavy Duty holds class-leading features in:
Fuel economy
Extended maintenance cycle (oil change, fuel filter life)
Brake life with advanced engine exhaust brake and largest brakes in the segment
The 2014 Ram Heavy Duty is backed with an unsurpassed five-year/100,000-mile Powertrain Limited Warranty. The powertrain-limited warranty covers the cost of all parts and labor needed to repair a covered powertrain component – engine, transmission and drive system. Coverage also includes free towing to the nearest Ram Truck dealer, if necessary. The warranty also is transferable allowing customers who sell their truck during the warranty period to pass the coverage to the new owner. The standard three-year/36,000-mile Basic Limited Warranty provides bumper-to-bumper coverage for the Ram Heavy Duty, from the body to the electrical system.

DESIGN
The new 2014 Ram 2500 and 3500 Heavy Duty models uphold a bold presence while retaining comfort and styling. The new Ram Heavy Duty features segment-leading technology – every model offers specific content.

Beginning in the 2014 model year, the Ram 2500 will offer a range of new 18- and 20-inch wheels, including forged aluminum, polished with painted, white gold painted pockets and cast aluminum with silver inserts. A cargo-view camera, mounted in the center high-mounted stop light (CHMSL) provides a view of the bed for easier fifth wheel or gooseneck trailers as well as monitoring bed loads. Also, a flat-load floor option is now available on Crew Cab models, featuring fold-out panels that create a flat surface across the floor of the rear seating area.

For 2014, the Ram Heavy Duty offers 12 different colors, including two new shades: Blue Streak and Granite Crystal; available in a monotone and/or two-tone depending on the model.

MANUFACTURING
Start of production of the 2014 Ram 2500 and 3500 Heavy Duty is scheduled for the third quarter of 2013 at the Saltillo Truck Assembly Plant in Coahuila, Mexico.
 

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PowerWagon with the 6.4!

Not quite as spiffy as the 6.7 true, but that should make some of the "moar torque" offroad crowd happy!
 

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Heavy truck and heavy towing and all that, look at the HP (5600rpm) and Torque (4000rpm). This is a truck, not race car. The numbers may be a slight bit smaller but I think it would actually perform better in hauling and rock crawling/off roading if these numbers were at 4800 and 3000 rpm respectfully, especially since there is a gearbox with so many gears it can shift through.
 

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dana44 said:
Heavy truck and heavy towing and all that, look at the HP (5600rpm) and Torque (4000rpm). This is a truck, not race car. The numbers may be a slight bit smaller but I think it would actually perform better in hauling and rock crawling/off roading if these numbers were at 4800 and 3000 rpm respectfully, especially since there is a gearbox with so many gears it can shift through.
While I agree 200%, the regulations for emissions push engineers to those high rpm's.
Lost in this discussion is the fact that the 3.0 diesel is at 420 lb ft, nearly the same towing ability, at a much lower rpm. (2100?)
These large gassers were offered because there is still a lack of consumer knowledge, when it comes to diesels and this is an attempt to get around customer aversion to Diesels and Diesel engine initial costs.
 

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While the torque "peak" is at 4000 RPM, the torque curve is likely very flat and it probably makes over 400 lb-ft of torque through most of the rev-range, possibly 400 lb-ft from idle if they designed the intake/camshafts well. We'll have to wait for official power/torque curves or for someone to throw one on a dyno to hear the full story.

Older V8s had torque that peaked very early and low, then rapidly dropped off. This made for decent low end, but very little power. This was mostly thanks to poor flowing heads and very conservative emissions-friendly camshafts. Modern V8s actually make more low-end torque then their predecessors (some of it is masked due to things like traction control and torque-management), but their camshafts and heads are so good, they can keep making that high amount of torque at high RPM. That lets engineers extract a lot more horsepower than they could before.
 

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All true, however horsepower is pretty irrelevant to real work performance.
Marketing needs to educate the average consumer about torque, not horsepower.
I think we agree that we need to see the technical data on both engines, to better see their abilities.
The Hemi's I saw testing last Summer in CO, were pulling 8,000 + lb sleds at 12,000 ft., what remains to be learned is their mpg while doing so...
 

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Horsepower is only irrelevant to people who want to pull 8,000 pounds up a 5% grade while still remaining in 6th gear. For people that don't mind their engines needing to rev occasionally - horsepower is VERY relevant. For example, the GM and Ford 6.2L V8 gasoline engines are capable of keeping up with the older 350/650 Cummins 6.7 on many loaded up-hill scenarios.

On one forum, the members arranged a "tow off", which consisted of a 15,000 pound trailer and a 10-15% grade hill. A 6.2L V8 truck crested the hill only 1-2 MPH slower than a brand-new 6.7 Ford Diesel. The 6.2 truck was slower off the line, but it's not often you need to come to a complete stop on a 15% grade with 15,000 pounds behind you. Once the V8 got going though, it pulled very hard.

Granted in situations such as that, the V8 engines are revving very high and are consuming copious amounts of fuel, but they are still very capable of doing the work in real-world situations.
 

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AutoTechnician said:
Horsepower is only irrelevant to people who want to pull 8,000 pounds up a 5% grade while still remaining in 6th gear.
Which is exactly what I said, and I do not disagree with the rest of that post. The main reason for selecting diesel is the power combined with low fuel consumption.
My old school 440 could do the job, at 8 mpg. My Cummins does the job easier, at 16 mpg.
It's a matter of familiarity for most, or more precisely, a fear of the unknown.
Diesels are still a misunderstood complexity to many consumers. The 3.0 should be a big boost to their education.
 

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One more thing maybe consumers consider in the gas or diesel choice is the diesel upfront cost, added cost of maintenance, and cost to fix if something breaks down.

Auto technician/MoparNorm i have enjoyed your comments on this and the 6.4 thread.
 

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What are the added cost of maintenance on a diesel that people keeping talking about? Only people keeping the vehicle past the drivetrain warranty need to consider any cost of break downs. Consumers need to realize that the resale value of the vehicle is normally higher because it is a diesel.
 

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kcoc said:
What are the added cost of maintenance on a diesel that people keeping talking about? Only people keeping the vehicle past the drivetrain warranty need to consider any cost of break downs. Consumers need to realize that the resale value of the vehicle is normally higher because it is a diesel.
There are maintenance intervals that need to be considered during the normal period of ownership. Depending on those intervals, it may be cheaper. I've owned a VM diesel in my old Liberty, and the maintenance interval for the engine was every 6250 miles. A diesel oil change can cost significantly more due to more oil required and more expensive oil required. Filters are similar cost.

The other costs of maintenance I am not sure about, but the fuel savings alone pays for the new diesel option (over a V8 gas) pretty quickly. Against the gas V6, not so much. In some places where diesel is cheaper, it will pay back faster. Nationwide, diesel costs more than gas, so the payback period is lengthened.
 

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kcoc said:
What are the added cost of maintenance on a diesel that people keeping talking about? Only people keeping the vehicle past the drivetrain warranty need to consider any cost of break downs. Consumers need to realize that the resale value of the vehicle is normally higher because it is a diesel.
As noted, diesels normally have a higher oil capacity and more expensive filters. The parts are heavy duty and generally cost more.
That being said, the primary electrical system is less complex, there are no costs for spark plugs, plug wires, coils or distributors.
Diesels generally have greater longevity and longer service life than gas motors.
Diesel fuel economy is normally 30-35% greater than equal displacement gas engines. Fuel prices can fluctuate, but for the last two months in SoCal, diesel has been approx. 10 cents per gallon cheaper than regular.
For all of that you end up with better torque which can mean payload and towing advantages over gasoline engines.
 

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I look at that specification list with my own skewed thinking and see a spot that's left uncovered and open for - and think they're missing out by NOT doing it - for the Iveco NEF Diesel engine that was co-developed with Cummins.

One version is a 5.9L Inline 6 ( just as the 5.9L Cummins B was offered with the earlier Dodge Ram ) which could slot between the VM 3.0L ( 400-odd Lb/Ft Torque) and the current 6.7L producing 850. The Iveco 5.9 had a range of HP and TQ - up to a max of 680-odd in TQ). I believe the 600-odd TQ engine does not require Urea ( but I have not followed it closely ). Iveco also has a 6.7L version which compares with the Cummins currently in the Ram Commercial. I know Cummins holds a long-standing vaunted place in the Ram history and market presence with respect to domestic Pick-up Trucks. But I'm also wondering if it wouldn't aid the umbrella brand to also use (not exclusively use ... also use) in-house Chrysler-Fiat gear as a complement to the established kit. Change happens.

I also thought it a bit odd to go for the purchase of VM Motori when FPT/Iveco produce Diesel for pretty much every sort of use : Static Power Generation all the way up to Heavy Roadway Hauling and Marine as well as the SDE's found in Euro city cars. I'm not against VM Motori gear, it just struck me peculiar when they have their own established, mature product lines which have been really rather successful.

This is just me musing about this topic -
 

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MoparNorm said:
As noted, diesels normally have a higher oil capacity and more expensive filters. The parts are heavy duty and generally cost more.
That being said, the primary electrical system is less complex, there are no costs for spark plugs, plug wires, coils or distributors.
Diesels generally have greater longevity and longer service life than gas motors.
Diesel fuel economy is normally 30-35% greater than equal displacement gas engines. Fuel prices can fluctuate, but for the last two months in SoCal, diesel has been approx. 10 cents per gallon cheaper than regular.
For all of that you end up with better torque which can mean payload and towing advantages over gasoline engines.
NOT offered as a correction, but rather as further corroboration : Diesel engines in the same class as the Cummins B (and larger) usually have a terrific lifespan, weighed against common petrol engines. Some people claim 300,000 miles or more before need for overhaul. Implicit with time-to-overhaul is the expectation of further useful service life after the overhaul. The other aspect is that the Cummins B (likely other brand diesel in the same class) takes about 25,000 miles just to break-in. Hoped for economy, HP and Torque are then realised ... I can't say from personal use. I owned a 2006 Cummins Dodge Ram 2500 for just three years.

This, supposedly, is different from expectations of SDE's found in the Jetta, Beetle and other Euro-sourced diesel cars. I'm unsure of what we here in the USA could expect from the 2.0 L to 3.0L Diesel range typically deployed in commuter and family car models we now see in Europe, but don't see in plentiful quantities here.
 

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Yes, thats why I wrote generally, for brevity, but...While the VM is in a different durability class than the 300,000 mile Cummins, it's far superior to the disposable Merc and VW diesels. The VM block is stiffened and uses cylinder technology borrowed and co-developed with Detroit Diesel and Cummins.
 

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MoparNorm said:
As noted, diesels normally have a higher oil capacity and more expensive filters. The parts are heavy duty and generally cost more.
That being said, the primary electrical system is less complex, there are no costs for spark plugs, plug wires, coils or distributors.
Diesels generally have greater longevity and longer service life than gas motors.
Diesel fuel economy is normally 30-35% greater than equal displacement gas engines. Fuel prices can fluctuate, but for the last two months in SoCal, diesel has been approx. 10 cents per gallon cheaper than regular.
For all of that you end up with better torque which can mean payload and towing advantages over gasoline engines.
All modern engines have eliminated distributors, most have eliminated plug wires, and coil packs are generally quite reliable - they do occasionally fail, but they are very cheap to replace.

Modern diesel engines have highly sophisticated electrical systems, arguably much more complex than a gasoline engine. Very few diesel injectors operate at 12 volts. Most require a special high voltage driver that operates the injectors up to 200 volts. Some newer systems even have injectors capable of sending feedback data back to the ECU. Couple that with the array of sensors and actuators required for proper DPF/SCR operation, and you have an electrical system that is far more complex than any gasoline powered vehicle.

Then you move onto costs. Spark plugs for a 5.7 Hemi are $1.70/pc. Coil packs are $20/pc, and fuel injectors are $30/pc and the fuel pump is $180. Gasoline injection components are generally very rugged, and capable of dealing with very poor fuel quality without damage.

A 6.7 Cummins injection pump is $650 (the newer Bosch CP4 pumps cost even more). The injectors cost $1200 a piece. Diesel fuel injection components (especially modern ones) are very sensitive to fuel quality, and a severe water-in-fuel situation is very likely to cause some injector or fuel pump damage. For the price of three 6.7 Cummins injectors, I can have a new 5.7 Hemi crate engine shipped to my front door.

Yes diesel engines are more durable, yes they tow better, and yes they often get better fuel economy - but what happens 5-7 years down the line when it is out of warranty? What happens if one of your drivers fills the tank up with gasoline? Suddenly you're out $8500 to replace all the injectors and the fuel pump. This is partially the reason many people are now going to gasoline engines in HD trucks.
 

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The only point I could see in adapting the NEF 6-cylinder into the Ram HD would be as a replacement for the Cummins B-series. The engines are too closely equivalent for there to be a point in having both, and there could be major engine-compartment redesigns necessary since the NEF generally has the timing geartrain at the flywheel end whereas the Ram's Cummins has it at the front face of the block. SCR technology would most likely be necessary to meet US emissions regulations.
 

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Thanks, AutoTechnician.

there are no costs for spark plugs, plug wires, coils or distributors.
I was just thinking that spark plugs last 100,000 miles, plug wires and coil packs last even longer, and distributors... don't exist.

If like most people you only keep your car for less than 200,000 miles, durability of a gasoline issue is not an issue.

Keep in mind I like diesels but a lot of people don't.

The 6.4 Hemi is there because half the market in the heavy duty pickups and 3500-level chassis cabs is still gasoline, according to the Ram guy.
 

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AutoTechnician said:
Yes diesel engines are more durable, yes they tow better, and yes they often get better fuel economy - but what happens 5-7 years down the line when it is out of warranty? What happens if one of your drivers fills the tank up with gasoline? Suddenly you're out $8500 to replace all the injectors and the fuel pump. This is partially the reason many people are now going to gasoline engines in HD trucks.
As a former fleet owner, I have had much better success and lower operating cost from my diesels than the gas engines. My Cummins has a 7 year-100,000 mile warranty and never need a penny put into it.
I don't see any trend toward gas, I see the opposite. Dodge is doing this to fill a gap in their product line and price point, not because there is suddenly a move toward gasoline engines.
If one reads the 5 year plan, Marchionne plans to further eliminate V8 offerings, not expand them.
Dr. Z said:
The 6.4 Hemi is there because half the market in the heavy duty pickups and 3500-level chassis cabs is still gasoline, according to the Ram guy.
Everything that I have read from Ram says the diesel take rate in their HD line is 85%.
The test drivers I talked to in Colorado, do admit it is softening, because of price resistance.
The economy won't stay down forever and CAFE will dictate improved mpg numbers for these trucks.
 

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ptschett said:
The only point I could see in adapting the NEF 6-cylinder into the Ram HD would be as a replacement for the Cummins B-series. The engines are too closely equivalent for there to be a point in having both, and there could be major engine-compartment redesigns necessary since the NEF generally has the timing geartrain at the flywheel end whereas the Ram's Cummins has it at the front face of the block. SCR technology would most likely be necessary to meet US emissions regulations.
Excellent bits to learn; thanks.

Iveco's NEF has a 6.7L variant. I'd need to do further research, but their Torque output is impressive. Being based off of, or at least co-developed with, the Cummins B could be replaced by the Iveco. I know that's anathema where Dodge Pick-up buyers are concerned. So many of Those owners (or so it's claimed) are not buying Dodge/Ram as much as they're buying Cummins ... the Ram gets tossed-in at no charge.

But if Chrysler-Fiat were to go strictly in-house, it doesn't appear that anyone would be the wiser on a Spec-for-Spec basis. Performance wise? I'm not privy to how Fiat/FPT/Iveco's gear would stand when compared with what's been logged while Cummins has been on board.

Ultimately, what I was saying was that the Ram would have Low-, Medium- and High-end Diesel capability by the means mentioned.

Would be good to learn how what I've called "in-house stuff" would stack against the Cummins products in a 'clinical' head-to-head. Would performance suffer, no difference, or be amped-up?
 
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