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. . . .The second schematic shows the system with an up-graded two field alternator.one field wire (green) going to the new electronic voltage regulator ...BUT it shows the other field wire grounded to the mounting tab on the voltage regulator... this is not correct is it? Shouldn't the second field wire from the new alternator go to the mounting plug on the new electronic voltage regulator? . . .
I believe this is the article in reference at valiant.org. Here is the link.

Electrical diagrams for Chrysler, Dodge, and Plymouth cars (at https://www.valiant.org/electrical-diagrams.html )

I looked at various wiring diagrams that I could find on the internet for Chrysler vehicles 1969 and earlier and 1970 and later. Vehicles with alternators built in 1969 and earlier used a one wire field alternator. The field coil wire was grounded internally to the alternator case. The vehicle used an electro-mechanical voltage regulator which pulsed 12 volt power to the field coil. The alternator field coil was power side pulsed / controlled.

However starting with 1970 models Chrysler built vehicles used a 2 field wire alternator with both field coil leads electrically insulated from the case. The voltage regulator became electronically controlled and used a 2 pin connector. The I terminal of the regulator provided 12 volt power to the electronic control mechanism and also provided 12 volt power through a separate wire to one side of the field coil. The other insulated field terminal of the alternator was connected through a green wire to the F terminal of the regulator. Thus the alternator field coil was ground side pulsed / controlled. The only way the author's wiring setup for connecting the voltage regulator to the alternator would function properly is if the voltage regulator were power side pulsed / controlled. No where could I find a reference that indicated anything contrary to an electronically controlled voltage regulator that is ground side pulsed / controlled.

So I agree with you that the author has drawn the blue wire incorrectly from one alternator field connection to the ground of the regulator case. It should be attached to the I terminal wire at the regulator. If you complete the wiring as shown by the author, both sides of the alternator field coil are grounded: 1 side to the regulator case and 1 side electronically through the regulator circuitry. So there is no current flow through the alternator field so no charging current on the alternator battery wire. Other than frustration no damage done. This article makes you wonder if the author wrote this procedure but never actually tested it to see if it worked. See attached image.

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Here are some references to wiring diagrams. Hopefully these will be of some assistance to you.
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Mopar 1966 - 1971 MyMopar - Mopar Forums & Information - Mopar Wiring Diagrams 1966 to 1971 (at http://www.mymopar.com/index.php?pid=27 )

Mopar 1972 - 1972 Mopar Wiring Diagrams - MyMopar.com - Dodge Plymouth Wiring Diagrams (at http://www.mymopar.com/72to76_wiring.htm )

. . . I believe now that I may have a short someplace in my starter circuit ...
First: What is the year, make, model vehicle, body style, engine, transmission? Any modifications from stock?

Second: What situation / behavior are you experiencing with the starter?
 

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. . . Hunting down a short, for testing purposes all wires removed from starter relay, all connections to voltage regulator removed, all wires except ground removed from alternator, both battery cables removed, main cable to started left intact. . . . . .
If you look at a 2 field wire Chrysler alternator from the 1970s era (I will assume that is the unit that is being used) schematics show NO separate ground wire to the unit. It is grounded through the case to the engine. So how / where is this alternator grounded? Is the larger diameter battery wire still attached to the alternator during your testing? See attached image.

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. . . As stated earlier I have up graded the wiring per MAD electrical directions.
. . . .
I am not familiar with MAD electrical directions? Is this the reference link at https://www.valiant.org/electrical-diagrams.html ?

. . . I have run a ground wire from the alternator and it it grounded with star washers at the voltage regulator mounting. . . .
Is this new ground wire attached to the alternator case? Or attached to one of the alternator field terminals?
 

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I carefully checked all your posts and I find no reference link to MAD electrical? What is the web site address for the MAD electrical?

Is this new ground wire connected at the voltage regulator body attached to the alternator case? Or attached to one of the alternator field terminals?

I am thinking that you are using some type of continuity meter that makes a sound when a complete circuit path is found? As mentioned it would be better to use a digital multimeter and check resistance in a path / circuit.

At this point isolate each component and check for continuity / resistance to ground. Check between the battery terminal at the starter solenoid and the case.
 

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I went back and looked and you are correct there is no shown link, however I KNOW I typed it in. Anyways I will post it again here. MadElectrical.com - Mad Enterprises (at http://www.madelectrical.com/ ). click on the "Electrical Tech" section. . . . .
This was a good article as it explained the pitfalls with running all electrical power for lights, accessories, heater, A C, etc through the amp meter. Weak spot was definitely the firewall connector as the images illustrated overheated and melted wiring connectors. So you did the right thing and eliminated that "fire source" and frustration.

I believe there are services that can convert a Chrysler amp meter into a volt meter and it will reside in the same opening in the instrument panel. You will maintain an original look and have a more modern gauge for monitoring the electrical system.

. . . I had to run a wire to ground the alternator so I just grounded both the alternator and the regulator to the body at the same place (although the voltage regulator has two other tabs that also act as a ground for the voltage regulator). I also used new star washers on each of the voltage regulator tabs to ensure a good ground. . . . .
This comment is interesting. Did you have to use a connecting ground wire between alternator and voltage regulator to get the system to charge the battery? You could have run a ground wire from the voltage regulator to the negative terminal at the battery to accomplish the same goal.

As you do your continuity checks follow the positive battery cable to the terminal on the starter solenoid. Do you have exhaust headers on the engine? Is the positive battery cable and terminal on the starter too close to the headers???? Sometimes the close proximity can cause electrical problems.

Disconnect the battery cable at the starter solenoid. Do a continuity check between the solenoid battery terminal and starter case. There should be no continuity.

Just follow all the wiring that you replaced and / or reinstalled and check any short, small, identifiable segments. If you have a short to ground it will be easier to identify and isolate.
 

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. . . . After all my upgraded new wires were disconnected, I pulled ignition switch, wiper switch, neutral safety switch, four way flasher, directional signal flasher, checked all fuses. NOW, I have no continuity between ground and my main wires coming from the old connection at the ammeter, but there is barley anything hooked up anymore . . . ..
Obviously one component or wire or device you added is causing a short / current drain to ground. So methodically add back 1 component at a time and then thoroughly test for a short to ground. When you add the culprit you will definitely know it. Tedious but don't let frustration overwhelm.
 

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. . . It is in the circuit for the interior lights that trigger through the switches that turns the interior lights on and off when you open and close the door. Now to find what is causing the short. I have a continuity test set up on the wires that are my disconnected wires from the ammeter and rerun with new 10 gauge wires to a distribution point on the outside of the bulkhead. I have one test lead on ground and one test lead on what if the battery was connected would be the HOT wires that provide power to the inside dash and other components (stereo, tach, gauge pod). As hooked up and with the door open, the continuity test is sounding a connection between the hot leads and ground. . . . .
All contributors on this forum are always willing to help in any way that we can. But it is extremely difficult to visualize this ENHANCED wiring mess you have with this vehicle and offer a scenario for a remedy :)

Go to this reference I posted on June 21, 2018 and retrieve the wiring diagram for 68 Dart A.

Mopar 1966 - 1971 MyMopar - Mopar Forums & Information - Mopar Wiring Diagrams 1966 to 1971 (at http://www.mymopar.com/index.php?pid=27 )

http://www.mymopar.com/downloads/1968/68DartA.jpg

Look for the wiring for the door jamb switches that control the interior lights. From the wiring schematic the door plunger switch when extended completes the circuit to ground. So that seems to be the way the system works.
 
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