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Discussion Starter #1
My issue is the "main seal", engine rear crank seal. Going for that need to remove the A-555.
I can get some advices from Mr. Haynes but I'd like to hear some experience from these "Remove all necessary hardware" -kind of things. I think now when the trans comes out, I'll replace the clutch disc as well eventhough no issues with that yet.
I'll probably need to leave this work for a 3rd party but would like to hear the most important things I need to pay attention to, thanks.

89 LeBaron T2.
 

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It seems to be an even split on opinions about whether to remove the engine and transmission as a unit, then take the transmission off outside the car, vs. struggling to remove the transmission with the engine still in the car. I've only removed them as a unit, when stripping a car, and also helping a friend install a rebuild of both.
 

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I've removed and replaced a few of the automatics on the 2.2 and 2.5 engines (and a 3.0). Two of those were for engine main seal replacement. It really is a lot of work. I do these on a concrete driveway using a standard floor jack and support the engine from above because you need to do a lot of scooting around under the engine and tranny. I always remove the battery and tray for better access.

You will be draining the tranny and removing the axles. I take the pan off to do a complete drain and then put the pan loosely back on for support for the jack. The starter must come off and all the cables and plugs to the tranny (including speed sensor). Once the engine is safely suspended from above and the tranny supported from below, the tranny mount must come off (accessible from driver's side wheel well). The lower bell housing bolts come out and the bottom steel splash shield comes off. That gives you access to the converter to flex plate bolts. Shoot some spray paint into one of the holes to 'match mark' the converter to the plate. It can only go in 1 way and match marking can save a ton of time later (think timing mark). You have to rotate the engine 90 degrees after each bolt is removed to get to the next bolt.

Remove the rest of the bell housing bolts and pry the tranny from the engine. Lower the tranny, making sure the extension housing clears the cross frame and doesn't get hung up. It is best to have a helper while you manuver the tranny by hand. It just makes it much easier. I've had my wife operate the jack for these few minutes. Hopefully, you had the car raised high enough so that you can slide the jack with tranny out. Expect it to be unstable and awkward. Also, expect some fluid to spill. I have big sheets of cardboard to keep oil from staining the driveway.

For removing your flex plate, I'd highly recommend an impact power wrench (either electric or air driven). The plate is also match marked to the crank, so shoot spray paint into one of the holes.

One lession learned the hard way on rear main seals...... Always put a repair sleeve on the crank. Once I had to do the job twice due to a newly replaced leaking seal. That is discouraging.

Putting the tranny back in can be pretty tough because of tight clearances. What I found worked best is to remove the engine mount for the left side (i.e. front of car under radiator), and shove the engine forward. I cut a 2X4 the right length to wedge between the engine oil pan and the cross member to keep the engine shoved forward. By keeping the tranny extension housing high up while raising the jack, you will clear the cross member pretty well. Watch the tranny mount as you raise it. It will need to clear the driver's side rail. There are locating pins for the tranny and engine, and usually once you get one bolt started, you are good from there.

I suspect that pulling the entire power train might be a bit easier on the back. Where I live, the local ordinances prohibit major vehicle disassembly, except in a closed garage. It is usually only enforced if a complaint comes in or the rare chance that a code enforcement officer drives by. Taking the tranny out the bottom is much less obvious to neighbors than having an overhead lift and the hood off the car. I have swapped 2.5 engines in my driveway, but got a few looks that might have suggested a possible complaint. I just work fast and get it done the same day... and so far have not been cited.

I wish I had some pictures from a 2.5 tranny replacement but only had a couple from when I did this on the minivan which is a 3.0 and is an even tougher job.

All I can say is the job is a lot of work and I hope I don't have to do another one in my lifetime. :)

I
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Gents thanks for your inputs again. You often get a slightly different view by just reading repair manuals :)
I could imagine many postpone this job by just adding oil, but I hate the stains on the parking spot. I already have a container under the car. My problem is also I don't have a carage. Added the neighbours reactions and the winter time I've planned to have this done, there is no question for me to do this in our shelter.
Now I need to think it could make sense to take the whole powertrain out, and make some overhaul for engine as well then. Btw, from the sound I quess I have exhaust manifold gasket leak or then cracked manifold. "TsuTsuTsu..." when cold but goes out almost completeley when engine warm...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello hello & Happy Holidays...
Planning this still. I believe another option would be to remove only the engine and leave transmission and driveaxles in place. Engine out with a hoist. I got this impression by reading Haynes' manual. Would there be problems in (dis)connecting the engine-trans combination, or with something else?
 

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You should not use the Haynes for working on this car. The Haynes is very vague and general. I have found that it can be wrong also.
Leave the engine in place and remove the transaxle. The rear of the engine will need to be supported by a fixture so it does not hang on the right side motor mount while the transaxle is out. You will need special tool #C-4681 to install the rear main seal.

See engine chapter 9 here. Rear main service is on page 9-42 (large file):
http://oskin.ru/pub/chrysler-dodge/manuals/Service%20Manuals/1992_AX_Acclaim_Dynasty_LeBaron_Shadow_FifthAvenue/92FWD_9.PDF

See transaxle removal in chapter 21 here (large file):
http://oskin.ru/pub/chrysler-dodge/manuals/Service%20Manuals/1992_AX_Acclaim_Dynasty_LeBaron_Shadow_FifthAvenue/92FWD_21.PDF
 

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Also make sure that it really is the rear main seal that is leaking. I have found head gasket oil leaks that drip down the back of the engine and off the transaxle bell-housing that look like a rear main leak from underneath.
 

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Also there is a threaded hole in the end of the head with a bolt that supports a turbo line that can and does leak. And there is an oil galley plug in the back of the block that can also mimic a rear main leak.

Thanks
Randy
 
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