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Discussion Starter #1
First off, after several month of not starting my 1986 Aries LE, I got it to start today when I bought a 4 guage thick jumper cables. That got my starter really crankin. Engine purrs nice. Well, two years ago, I had a rusted brake line towards the rear right wheel. I saw where it is. And it is on the curve line. So, how do I repair that. And what solution is there to care the remaining brale lines on derusting them?

That one hole, no brakes on all four wheels.
 

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KOG
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One hole will mean no brakes on two wheels, right rear and left front int this case. You've got other problems. There ie no repair for rusted brake lines, only replacement. And it wouldn't be a bad idea to replace every metal line under the car when one rusts through. The others can't be that far behind.
 
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Line replacement is the best way. Usually when trying to replace the brake lines, Pandora's box opens and the fuel lines start leaking as well. Make sure that all 4 bleeders are free.
I buy a 25' roll of 3/16" brake tubing and end fittings. Then cut, flare and bend my own.
Fuel lines are 5/16" and 1/4". Copper tubing is easier to bend for fuel lines than steel tubing.
 

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Ca. 2006 I had about a 1990 Chevy C1500 from the Rust Belt (New York State maybe?) with several rotted out brake lines, replaced the one that ran from the rear hose over the gas tank to the ABS dump valve. Truck still leaked fluid since I now had full pressure to the rear brakes; replaced both hard lines to the wheel cylinders and that solved the problem.
 

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For fuel lines, I had a very strange situation on my '95 Spirit where one section of the fuel lines was petrified while the rest had little more than greying from age. I used a braided-steel-shielded line for pump pressure and regular lines for the low-pressure return and vent, which I stuffed behind the braided line to keep them safe. It's an expensive proposition, but something you might consider if you're in a situation like I was, especially with a lot of curves in the line like I had. Can't advise this for brakes, though.
 

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Replace them all for everyone's safety and longevity. Poly Armour and a few other brands have a polyfluoride coating on them to reduce rusting.
 

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Agree with Bob, to be honest. My Spirit had a very unusual situation. Tubing is easy to do if you do all of it, which it certainly sounds like you need, not to mention cheaper. If you're having trouble with fittings (not that you should), try a local speed shop. I know that at least for me, the speed shop has a far better variety of fittings, tubing and hoses, not to mention a more knowledgeable staff, than the auto parts stores. You'll pay more, but since you're essentially doing a custom fab (which these folks are very experienced with), the advice and expertise may be worth it.
 

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Bubble flare, I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone. There is hope. I saw this Youtube video that a guy replaced rusted brake line in his Honda. It was easy. I went to the parts shop, and it has what I need. The metal brake line tubing, the fittings, everything. I will swap all the lines starting with the rears. Then, look at the fronts if any problem. The rubber hoses are fine. I see no brake fluid around the outside. I can do this!
 

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You should change the rubber hoses, too. The way they fail is that the inner lining leaks, then when you step on the brake, the fluid goes between the inner and outer linings, and holds pressure on the calipers so that they don't release. Nothing visibly wrong from the outside.
 
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