Allpar Forums banner

41 - 60 of 100 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Another way to bleed the pressure is disconnect the fuel pump relay and crank the ignition, it may sputter and die or just crank over like it isn't getting fuel which is what you want, to disconnect the filter from the disconnect push the filter into the connector while you use the quick release connector, on others it's a disconnect tool that's required then pull the filter away from the hose.

If you run the big filter or even the small filter pour some fresh oil in it before installing it, get it full as possible, sure you might lose some installing it but it won't be much, I also prime the system by disconnecting the ignition coil wire and cutting the fuel pump relay and crank it over a little bit to get oil to the filter before starting, if you have an oil pressure gauge you should see it slowly move to the middle as you crank the starter in 10 sec. Intervals so as not to burn out the starter, this eliminates dry start and is a necessity on turbo or supercharged engines but is great practice on N/A types saves those bearings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #42
Another way to bleed the pressure is disconnect the fuel pump relay and crank the ignition, it may sputter and die or just crank over like it isn't getting fuel which is what you want, to disconnect the filter from the disconnect push the filter into the connector while you use the quick release connector, on others it's a disconnect tool that's required then pull the filter away from the hose.

If you run the big filter or even the small filter pour some fresh oil in it before installing it, get it full as possible, sure you might lose some installing it but it won't be much, I also prime the system by disconnecting the ignition coil wire and cutting the fuel pump relay and crank it over a little bit to get oil to the filter before starting, if you have an oil pressure gauge you should see it slowly move to the middle as you crank the starter in 10 sec. Intervals so as not to burn out the starter, this eliminates dry start and is a necessity on turbo or supercharged engines but is great practice on N/A types saves those bearings.
. That sounds like a much simpler way than what I've read online, I'll try that.

But tonite something disturbing happened. I was getting drive through when at idle the engine started to stall and I had to give it gas to keep it going. Happened twice with a couple minutes between. Thought it might happen again at stoplights but it didn't. Starting to get nervous about my purchase, I hope it wasn't a mistake. This sounds like a map sensor prob, do you think it could be anything else? I still need to do the tune up, I just literally haven't had anytime while the suns up to do so :(
 

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,671 Posts
Not sure what you mean by "getting drive through when at idle the engine started to stall".

Before replacing the MAP sensor I'd check the vacum line that connects the MAP sensor to the throttle body first for cracks/leaks. I never had to replace a MAP sensor in the 3 EEK's (Every Extended K-Car) I had.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
Not sure what you mean by "getting drive through when at idle the engine started to stall".

Before replacing the MAP sensor I'd check the vacum line that connects the MAP sensor to the throttle body first for cracks/leaks. I never had to replace a MAP sensor in the 3 EEK's (Every Extended K-Car) I had.
Oh we were in the drive thru line at jack in the box.

OK I'll check out the lines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
You can spray with brake parts cleaner around them with the car running to see if the idle changes if it does the leak is where you sprayed or you can use a propane torch, just turn in the gas nozzle run a hose over it and put it near and around any intake gaskets or vacuum lines, it will surge the idle if there is a leak in that vicinity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #48
Did the tune up today, thankfully the plugs had no oil on them, but they were in for a long time. Just cooked, ends of the wires same way, and rotor cap totally worn. Gonna do the oil change now. I'll do the o2 sensor in a week or so
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #49
Oh there was a little bit of oil in the air filter, is there something that needs to be cleaned?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
31,983 Posts
The breather filter often gets overlooked, especially in these cars. This is the small filter element for the inlet air for the crankcase/PCV system. It's inside the lower end of the air cleaner box, at the hose that connects it to the valve cover. To access it, remove the air cleaner box (being careful not to snap the rigid vacuum line on the underside at the thermostatic switch), invert it and use a torx driver (T-20?) to remove the 6 screws that hold the lower portion onto the air box. Reach inside and remove the steel wool mesh, then the breather filter. It's about 1 1/2 x 1 x inches. You can get a new one at any parts stores, and if they don't have the exact one, but a larger rectangular one and cut to fit with scissors. Lightly oil it, insert, insert the mesh to hold it in place, screw the lower airbox back on, connect up the air box again. Done.

And make sure to replace the PCV valve.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CaravelleMan

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #51
So I need to change the timing belt, but my mechanic wants $900, I wanna do it my self, but I am not confidant in my abilities to do so without fracking it up. Any suggestions? Is that the usual rate?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
That's crazy! It's about 1-2 hours the most on a 2.2 engine if you have allt he equipment and experience. What's he changing for that kind of money? How much labor is he talking?
 

·
Virginia Gentleman
Joined
·
14,671 Posts
Yeah, that is abnormally high for the 2.2L. Last I paid on my 2.5L (essentially the same block) was under $300. That was 5 years ago. Accounting for inflation, I could see $350-$400, but $900 is waaaaayyyyy tooooo much. Find another mechanic.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
31,983 Posts
Yes, should be under $300. For a good mechanic, this is a 2-hr job. It's one of the easiest engines to do it on. I did it myself a few years ago when my head gasket blew out. You can change it yourself for under $50. First time, plan on 4-5 hours to go slow and be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter #55
He got that figure cause he was gonna change the other belts and water pump but that's just too much. I inquired about the mechanical history at Santa Cruz Dodge and they said the car has been serviced there its whole life. When I asked if timing belt was changed they said the drive belt and serpentine was changed just last year. He couldn't confirm timing.

So I think I'll try to do it myself. I have lots of tools, just nothing to take tensioners off, and no way to test belt tension. Do I need a timing light? I assume I should change all belts now that I'll be taking them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
Think positive ! If "three thumbs" (me) can do it, anyone can. Just start with the marks on the sprockets lined up and you be fine. I have mentioned before, it is the best time to look over the water pump and replace it if it is showing signs of wear or miles. It is easy to replace since you are 2/3 all ready there. Both times I did a t- belt replacement, my pump was starting to dribble or getting that notchy feeling when rotating it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
36,923 Posts
Oh man. So if I screw up, what's the worst that can happen? o_O
The worst thing that can happen is you'd have to take it apart and do it again. The 2.2 is a non-interference engine so you won't have pistons and valves hitting no matter how mush you mess up.
if you go slow and follow directions (and maybe bag and label fasteners as you take it apart) it won't be bad. Make sure it's all clean before reassembly and it should be a smooth job.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CaravelleMan

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,098 Posts
The other belts were just replaced, so they are fine. I would suggest you get a timing belt kit which includes the timing belt tensioner. Sometimes the bearing wears on these so replacing it is good insurance. Check Rock Auto or E-Bay. Gates is a good brand.
 
41 - 60 of 100 Posts
Top