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Today I was in the process of replacing spark plugs in my 2000 Chrysler Grand Voyager with 3.3 liter V6 engine. The spark plug wires have been in place on the plugs for 10 years so removal was extremely difficult. So with brute strength I accidentally pulled the terminal end from the resistance wire in the boot on #6 plug. So I will have to replace at least one spark plug wire and probably would not hurt to replace all six.

OEM is no longer available so any thoughts on a particular brand to purchase? I want something durable as the 3 plugs and wires next to the firewall are not very accessible and I do not want to have to visit this plug and wire exercise for many years.

I did some research and it appears silicone spark plug wires are better for electrical insulation and can withstand higher under hood temperatures?
 

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Thats interesting because about 2 years ago I was able to get the OEM from a Chrysler dealership wires for my 92 Plymouth Grand Voyager with the 3.3 Liter.
 

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OEM plugs are important. I have used premium store-brand plug wire sets with no problem. They usually fit and perform like OEM. Belden makes wire sets for many of the other brand names.
I usually smear a blob of silicone grease in the boot at either end to facilitate weatherproofing and aid in easy future removal. Route the wiring using the looms to keep wires away from heat and rub-through.
Mopar cable sets look to be still available using any of these part numbers:
Dodge Grand Caravan Cable pkg. Ignition. Mopar - 04797685AB | Myrtle Beach SC (at https://www.moparpartsinc.com/p/Dodge__Grand-Caravan/CABLE-PKG-IGNITION/42204473/04797685AB.html )
 

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Agree with Imperial. I believe I used Belden plug wires for my daughter's 2005 Neon many years ago. For whatever reason the OEM wires were shot after only 35,000 miles. I had replaced the plugs on her Neon, but it still had a rough idle (miss). Replacing the wires cured it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
. . . I usually smear a blob of silicone grease in the boot at either end to facilitate weatherproofing and aid in easy future removal. Route the wiring using the looms to keep wires away from heat and rub-through.
Mopar cable sets look to be still available using any of these part numbers:
Dodge Grand Caravan Cable pkg. Ignition. Mopar - 04797685AB | Myrtle Beach SC (at https://www.moparpartsinc.com/p/Dodge__Grand-Caravan/CABLE-PKG-IGNITION/42204473/04797685AB.html ) . . .
I tried looking at several of the Mopar discounters that advertise online. Selection software only went back to model year 2001 and later. So I assumed that a 20 year old vehicle no longer had factory parts. I should have dug deeper and found something. Thanks for the insight.
 

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I tried looking at several of the Mopar discounters that advertise online. Selection software only went back to model year 2001 and later. So I assumed that a 20 year old vehicle no longer had factory parts. I should have dug deeper and found something. Thanks for the insight.
I did a little searching on inventories with regard to the 4797685AB and you shouldn't have any trouble going to your local dealer and having them order a set. I had a 98 Town and Country 3.8 for 309,000 miles. I did the wires on that van 3 times in those years. Every 100K because as we know the back three are a pain. I always tried to get the OE's. The last set though at 300K I got Autolites. They fit exactly the same as the OE's The only thing they didn't include at the time (this was in 2016) was the protection tubing for the back three plug wires. That I had to reuse. I never did get to see the longevity of those wires as the the van died at 309K. But i didn't have any complaints with them with regard to fit and price.
 

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Belden or Echlin, which I believe have beem OEM suppliers in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
. . . Belden or Echlin, which I believe have beem OEM suppliers in the past. . . .
Life's dilemmas.

I found a premium spark plug wire set made by Belden at a local NAPA store but the item was not in stock but had to be ordered. Store only keeps cheaper line of parts in stock. Ordered the Belden replacement set through NAPA on Wednesday. Went to the store today and no order fulfilled. Seems central Oklahoma had a severe ice storm Tuesday into early Wednesday. All the local NAPA stores get parts from an Oklahoma City distribution warehouse and the ice storm has caused major power outages at the distribution center and OKC area.

So no idea when the order can be fulfilled. I can go with a lower quality replacement set of spark plug wires and get the van back into service or wait maybe a week or longer to see if I can get the premium set. Problem is that the 3 spark plugs and wires near the firewall are very difficult if not impossible to access. I have the wiper cowl and upper intake removed to make access easier. Do NOT want to remove those items in the near future just to change spark plug wires.

Appreciate all the comments given.
 

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Honestly if I was my van and I am speaking from owning one just like yours for over 18 years. I would get the van back into service over waiting a week or more for the Belden set that may or may not come. There are very few spark plug wire manufacturers left in the world. It is a dying category. I've worked in the aftermarket auto parts for over 20 years and this product type crosses my radar quite often. There is so much consolidation these days. I would want to make sure the back three wires have the plastic protection sheathing on them. However possible. Either they come with them from the manufacturer or you place them on there yourself. Other than that, place some dialectic grease in the boots and install what you can. Hopefully this helps a bit.
 

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. . . Honestly if I was my van and I am speaking from owning one just like yours for over 18 years. I would get the van back into service over waiting a week or more for the Belden set that may or may not come.. . . . .
Well I had some good news early this morning. NAPA parts warehouse in OKC has restored electric power so my order of the Belden spark plug wire set arrived and I purchased it. So no real delay due to a wait on parts shipment. If I had no ordered parts today I would have just purchased a lesser quality in the store, installed and moved forward.

. . . The industry has been moving toward individual coil-on-plug (COP) ignition for the past 10-15 years. Distributor caps, rotors and carburetors are already 'dinosaur parts'. . . .
I can see eliminating the high voltage secondary spark plug circuit. For many years you had the issue of wear, corrosion on contacts in a distributor cap and then possible breakdown of the high voltage spark plug wires connecting each individual distributor port to its respective spark plug. Create separate coils and move the coil to the individual spark plug and you eliminate the need for a separate spark plug wire to the plug.

But in this process one set of problems is eliminated but another failure condition could arise. With a distributor spark system or a system that uses a waste spark design (no distributor) if one plug in the firing order fails to fire / discharge its high voltage energy, there is the next spark plug in firing order that can dissipate the stored energy in the coil since the coil output is shared among all the spark plugs. But with individual coil on plug ignition, if one plug fails to fire /discharge its high energy in the coil, the coil keeps building energy but has no way to dissipate it. Then the coil will overheat and fail. Is there logic in the engine ignition control module of the PCM to recognize this situation and turn off the coil driver on the cylinder with misfire to prevent overheating and failure of the coil?
 

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So with brute strength I accidentally pulled the terminal end from the resistance wire in the boot on #6 plug.
I did this on my current truck, but it was probably less strength than not pulling it from far enough down. I replaced it with one from a junkyard. So far, so good.

When buying new, I look for a lifetime warranty before anything else. The last time I bought an entire set, it was from Napa, though I don't remember what brand. They lasted, and I trust those you bought will also last.
 

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. . . The last time I bought an entire set, it was from Napa, though I don't remember what brand. They lasted, and I trust those you bought will also last. . . .
Definitely encouraging so thanks for the response!
 

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But in this process one set of problems is eliminated but another failure condition could arise. With a distributor spark system or a system that uses a waste spark design (no distributor) if one plug in the firing order fails to fire / discharge its high voltage energy, there is the next spark plug in firing order that can dissipate the stored energy in the coil since the coil output is shared among all the spark plugs. But with individual coil on plug ignition, if one plug fails to fire /discharge its high energy in the coil, the coil keeps building energy but has no way to dissipate it. Then the coil will overheat and fail. Is there logic in the engine ignition control module of the PCM to recognize this situation and turn off the coil driver on the cylinder with misfire to prevent overheating and failure of the coil?
I haven't read of many coil-on-plug failures. A few here and there, but not a widespread problem. Then Hemi (coil-on-plug) in my '06 Ram 1500 has 272K miles and has had no problem with any of the coils.
 
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