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It's hard to determine where to put this, auto industry news or alternative fuel news.
Mercedes sprinter offering the 2.1L crd to US market.
The 3.0Lcrd 188hp 325lb-ft will still be available with 6sp auto, but the 2.1L 161hp 265lb-ft 1400-2400 rpm 7sp auto will be new to the line up.


Promaster with the I-4 3.0Lcrd will have it's hands full competing with MB. Let alone the Ram C/V.
Unless the Ram C/V / caravan/ town & country comes out with a 2.0L-2.2L crd + 8sp there doesn't seem to be much hope for this model other than people do not need a huge Sprinter.

The Sprinter article in autoblog also talks about a supercharged I-4 gas motor and CNG briefly. But no details.
Truck trend article points out the 2.1L crd puts out more than the older 5cyl 2.7L crd. Plus the fuel mileage is suppose to be around 37mpg ish for the 8600 GVWR sprinter.
Plus they spill that the I-4 supercharged motor is a small 1.8L 156hp unit. 6sp manual or 7sp auto.
Sprinter also is lowered to ease loading & climbing in the cab, lower drag = better fuel economy.
 

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Price: TBD
however sprinters are usually $36k+

c/v start at $23k and is much smaller

they appear to be aimed for different users

But, yes a diesel wouldn't be a bad thing
 

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The Ram C/V is a lame duck as is also the sold everywhere but here Fiat Scudo. We are getting the Doblo, but the specifics remain sketchy. Fleet buyers are now also asking for CNG and electric powertrains. Don't be surprised if Ram offers a CNG van.
 

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CNG is sensible for fleets, it's cheap and relatively easy. Electric makes sense for "short run" fleets, really, in NYC there's no better powerplant for most delivery and repair trucks (which is why electric delivery vans lasted through the 1960s in Britain).

It's sad that we end up being so monolithic in our buying, when different segments really have different needs. I know there are economies of scale, but often choices of vehicle seem to have "corporate logic" applied, e.g. "We use Windows for accounting, secretarial, and POS, so we should have no Macs or UNIX/Linux boxes anywhere."

Thing is, I'd hope that each powertrain option is chosen due to their practical value rather than to vague unsubstantiated, unresearched thoughts about greenliness. Sometimes what seems green, isn't.

It'd be nice if more decisions were based on rational thought and exploration of facts ... not that facts are always there for the taking. (It drives me nuts when people replace boilers or hot water heaters with "whatever's cheapest," "whatever we had before," "what the utility/plumber/handyman has," etc., not realizing that paying the same amount or $100 more can save them big-time, the first winter/year they have it installed. Then again, when I was at Engelhard, the sales guys had a hard time getting facility managers/owners to shell out more money for capital expense, even though within 3-5 years the catalyst would pay for itself over an incineration system, in reduced energy costs and often by generating industrial steam.)

But yes, this is bad for Ducato, and probably was aimed at Prom Master and Nissan NV-whatever. Mostly Nissan, I suspect, though given the hard feelings, who knows? And here I was thinking Sprinter would be a dead duck within two years. Well, maybe it will be, with Ford coming on-line with their eurovans, GM thinking slowly of doing the same, NV-whatever, and the full Fiat line.
 

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Well, at my work, I think that a modern Euro-full-sized van would probably not go over as well even with many of the more physical trades. The conventional American full-sized vans are short enough in height to fit down breezeways and under overhanging tree branches. In my particular line of work my full-sized '01 Ram Maxiwagon is just a little bigger than I need in telecom infrastructure, and for the computer guys, well, they could work out of something the size of a Neon without any trouble except for the occasional need to move a whole lab's worth of computers at once. For those circumstances I'd leave one full-sized van parked, empty, to be used on an as-needed basis.

I could make-do with a minivan. The ladders would go straight down the inside center of the van and up between the front seats. I'd have shelving behind one of the sliding doors accessed when that door is opened, probably on the driver's side, for all of the small parts like patch cords and connectors and fiber optic transceivers and wallplates and such. I'd store rolls of cable on the passenger's side between the C and D pillars, and I'd have room on the back driver's side and behind the sliding door on the passenger's side for cargo.
 

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Mercedes can claim 37mpg for their diesel, but can they deliver? Nissan has access to both Renault and Mercedes diesels, but they are working with Cummins on the Atlas 4 cylinder. The rumors are hot and heavy the Atlas in combination with the ZF 8 speed will show up in the next generation Titan and van.

I don't know how different the Saltillo built vans are from the Euro ones. The Ducato offers a very sophisticated CNG version overseas. Unlike the Ram CNG pickup, the Ducato's tanks don't eat up cargo space. Money is tight at the moment so that might push off a CNG fueled version of the Pentastar. That would offer savings over the CNG 3 liter four cylinder currently offered. The 3 liter doesn't fit in the Scudo, while the Scudo replacement will offer the Pentastar.

The Doblo is offered with a bi-fuel option (gasoline or CNG), which is the forerunner of the Ram pickup CNG system. The engineering work has been done, but who knows what we'll get here when it comes.

The current Ford and Chevy vans offer factory approved aftermarket LPG and CNG conversions. I don't know what the prices are, but I suspect they aren't as pricey as the Sprinter. I bring this up because the fuel prices are vey attractive.

The current rage in pickups is gasoline fueled six cylinders. Both the upcoming Ford and Dodge Vans have this standard. Mercedes isn't offering a gas motor in the US.
 
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