Allpar Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got a call from Dad this morning that a friend of his had found a '77 Cordoba in a self-service yard. So, despite the high being predicted to 110°F today, my wife and I met him at the yard and we started stripping. Found the odometer reading 20XXX, and based on the condition of the car it may well be unrolled. The body was a little beat up from being in the yard, and they aren't willing to sell cars from the yard. It's a 400 car, but I needed interior parts, as the upholsterer made off with my stuff and never returned it.

We pulled the front seats, door panels, factory-tinted door glass, A-pillars, kick panels, sills, dash cluster surround, lower dash bezel, sun visors, opera window surrounds, sail panels, headlight/wiper controller, sport mirrors, and trunk carpet kit in about two hours. Funny enough, someone had already worked on this car, the sail panels were both painted, quality job, from their different original colors. The '77 has different seabelts than my '78, and the headliner is actually different on account of that, so I didn't pull it even though it was perfect. Technically the sail panels are a little different too as there are slits for the belt retractors, but I'll just glue something inside to close off those holes.

Dad may check up on it as it sits in the yard. If someone pulls the 400 then he may go back for the front subframe for his Charger, he has a disassembled 440 high performance motor to possibly put together and install in place of the current 318. The '77 has a 9¼" axle with open differential, but I expect was not a tow-package car because of the rear antisway bar. It did have some good-shape albeit pedestrian tires on it, but I don't need 'em. My current wheels will need new tires once the car is closer to being registered again, but I think that I can break-in the engine with the current rubber.

So, now that I have a friggin' front seat again maybe I'll be motivated to start putting the car together. I'll still need an upholsterer to reupholster the front seats and the door panels, and I'll have to figure out how to prime and paint the plastics, but it's at least possible now to drive the car once the drivetrain and other mechanical bits are reinstalled.

It turns out that the friend that told Dad about the car ended up at the doctor because of heatstroke while out in the yard when he found the car in the first place. I guess that I'm lucky that I found out about it at all. Pasty white as all of us that went are, we brought our 10'x10' easy-up canopy to reduce sun exposure and make it less miserable working, and I have to say, basically any time I go to the junkyard to strip a specific car, that canopy is coming along. Even as much of a pain as it was to bring it into the yard, it made it a lot easier while in there.

I also highly recommend having a battery-operated impact-bit-driver if one is doing a lot of interior disassembly. My Craftsman 19.2V tool with #2 bits of various lengths worked on every #2 Philips screw that I needed to remove, I didn't need a regular screwdriver at all. Dad wanted the sport mirrors so he needed a bit driven by a 1/4" ratchet to remove the glove compartment liner, but I think that was the only place where the impact tool wouldn't have reached.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,926 Posts
Excellent haul there, Tannon!

B body Cordoba specific stuff; like 1973-77 Old Cutlass parts, are becoming real thin on the ground these days.
 

·
DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That's the one annoying thing about the '77/'78 split... a whole series of specific parts are not capable of being used...

Now, the '78 Charger used the same fenders and trunk lid as the '75-'77 Cordoba, but the Cordoba got refreshed when the Magnum came out. I suspect, but I don't know for sure, that the Cordoba's refresh for '78 was a direct result of the Magnum's arrival, and it made necessary the new fenders at a minimum so that they could share the fenders, and since the Magnum's look required the trunk lid and bumper changes, that it just made sense to apply them to the Cordoba.

What I don't quite get is why there was a '78 model year for the Charger, and since there was one, did they build all of the Chargers first, then retool for the new Cordoba and new Magnum, and build no more Chargers, or did they build all of the Chargers in one plant that built Chargers and Cordobas, and retool another plant that build Chargers and Cordobas to build Magnums and Cordobas?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
36,926 Posts
All of these cars were made in Windsor from 1975-1979, likely they could build the Charger, Magnum and Cordoba all at once. The differences like fenders, trunk lids and bumpers just meant there were a few more piles of parts along the assembly line. I always heard the 1978 Charger was just in case the Magnum styling flopped with the public. Or that they had too many of the old parts with the restyle of the Cordoba. I think the Cordoba restyle in 1978 was to catch up with the Chevy Monte Carlo that went from round headlights to stacked square headlights a few years earlier.

I'm surprised that 1977 in the junkyard had a 9.25" axle, even with the 400 most had the 8.25" axle.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,926 Posts
valiant67 said:
All of these cars were made in Windsor from 1975-1979, likely they could build the Charger, Magnum and Cordoba all at once. The differences like fenders, trunk lids and bumpers just meant there were a few more piles of parts along the assembly line. I always heard the 1978 Charger was just in case the Magnum styling flopped with the public. Or that they had too many of the old parts with the restyle of the Cordoba. I think the Cordoba restyle in 1978 was to catch up with the Chevy Monte Carlo that went from round headlights to stacked square headlights a few years earlier.

I'm surprised that 1977 in the junkyard had a 9.25" axle, even with the 400 most had the 8.25" axle.
That does surprise me since I figured that all big block Mopar passenger vehicles after the 8 3/4" rear end went away would have the 9 1/4" as standard with it being optional on the 360 and smaller motors.
 

·
DO NOT FEED THE TROLLS!
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well, my buddy's '78 Magnum has the 9¼" open, and I sourced my 9¼" Sure Grip from an R-body Chrysler ex-police car. The '78 Magnum E58 with the California-ordered towing package car I had also had the 9¼".

I've personally seen about a 50/50 split, and come to think of it, cars that originally shipped with the 727 had the 9¼", while cars that shipped with the 904 variant had the 8¼", like my 2bbl 360 Cordoba had, and like my buddy's formerly-2bbl 360 had before he also upgraded.

Maybe I should go back and pull that axle... If it's as low-miles as the car seems to be then that may be a good candidate for a rebuild with a new limited slip, or at least a good source for axles if my bearings ever give me problems...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
36,926 Posts
Yes, the B and R body cop cars and trailer towing cars always got the 9.25". But I guess the normal 400 Lean Burn cars were so detuned the 8.25" held up fine in those.
it's a shame the later (as in around 1999 and up) 9.25" axle wasn't as sturdy as these early ones. Lots of Dakotas and Durangos (including the Dakota in my driveway) had 9.25" axles with issues.

Sometimes a car got a 9.25" axle for no reason. My friend had a 318-2 Magnum with few options and it has the 9.25" axle though it had a 904 transmission.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top