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Discussion Starter #1
I've let my 62 sit idle for many months and its time to get it at least running. It turns over fine but I had no ignition or discernible fuel at carb,, I added many gallons of fresh fuel, still nothing, so disconnected the fuel line between pump and carb and am getting nothing.

Any tests or actions I can do before yanking the pump?

How easy it will it be to rebuild or replace the pump?

Thanks!
 

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Disconnect the line below the fuel filter to be sure that's not clogged.
Replacing the pump is easy, except access is not great. Disconnect the fuel lines in and out, and then the bolts holding it to the right side of the engine. When installing, be sure the pump arm is riding on top of the camshaft lobe and not under it. This would break the pump arm and possibly the camshaft. To avoid this, after installing the pump, turn the engine by hand and see if it binds at all.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Disconnect the line below the fuel filter to be sure that's not clogged.
Replacing the pump is easy, except access is not great. Disconnect the fuel lines in and out, and then the bolts holding it to the right side of the engine. When installing, be sure the pump arm is riding on top of the camshaft lobe and not under it. This would break the pump arm and possibly the camshaft. To avoid this, after installing the pump, turn the engine by hand and see if it binds at all.
Thanks much. I've already disconnected the fuel line below the filter and I'm not getting fuel when I crank the engine is there anything else I can check before pulling the pump?
 

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Any time I "wake up" an old carb'd car after a rest I fill the carb bowl with fuel.

Most carbs have a vent that can be used to fill the float bowl.

I have an old plastic dish soap bottle with I call my primer bottle.

Saves wear and tear on the starter etc. as the Engine should fire right up.

Sometimes, old fuel pumps need a few more RPM that the starter provides to respond.

Thanks
Randy
 

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Disconnect the line below the fuel filter to be sure that's not clogged.
Replacing the pump is easy, except access is not great. Disconnect the fuel lines in and out, and then the bolts holding it to the right side of the engine. When installing, be sure the pump arm is riding on top of the camshaft lobe and not under it. This would break the pump arm and possibly the camshaft. To avoid this, after installing the pump, turn the engine by hand and see if it binds at all.
In addition to what Bob said, it also only takes a pinhole in a steel line, a cracked rubber line or even a loose clamp to make the fuel pump suck air instead of gasoline.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for inputs. Possibilities for lack of fuel reachng the carb abound. New idea about what to worry about is whether or not the intake at the tank is clogged. If I disconnect the fuel line where it comes into the pump, should I get any fuel drain there? And how can I poke at the inlet to determine if my problem is with a bad pump or clogged inlet/line? The tank used to have a leak on the bottom so it drained quite dry before I patched it, so who knows the condition of the inlet can be.
 

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But also, comment noted that perhaps the regular cranking ability of an average battery isn't quite the same as when the engine is driving the pump .... I will see about trying to run the engine with "squirted fuel" into the carb, maybe that will get the pump working ....
 

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Please keep in mind I was referring to filling the carb bowl.

Not squirting it down the carb throat as this can be dangerous.

Thanks
Randy
 

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New idea about what to worry about is whether or not the intake at the tank is clogged. If I disconnect the fuel line where it comes into the pump, should I get any fuel drain there? And how can I poke at the inlet to determine if my problem is with a bad pump or clogged inlet/line? The tank used to have a leak on the bottom so it drained quite dry before I patched it, so who knows the condition of the inlet can be.
You can remove the pick-up from the tank and examine it. If the pump hasn't been drawing gas, the fuel line will probably be dry. You'll have to visually inspect the line for bad spots, but at its age, you might want to replace all of the rubber sections of the line anyway.

Do you know how long the leak was in the tank? It might have let moisture in, which could have developed rust. If that isn't checked, it will eventually damage a new fuel pump. You might inspect the tank's inlet tube for rust. Decades ago, I bought a '66 Fury for a driver. It had a rusty tank, so I installed another gas filter in the line just before gas entered the fuel pump. I had to replace the filter frequently, but the pump never went bad.
 
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