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Discussion Starter · #1,021 ·
Nascar records show Pearson's win @ Asheville (which I posted above) was his 7th in 1966. That would make this win in Maryville, Tenn his 8th. Regardless, he would go on to win the 1966 Cup Championship in the Cotton Owens Dodge.

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I like the part where the writer says Pearson so dominated that it was like sitting through an hour long Dodge commercial :D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,022 ·
Photo (shared from Pinterest) of 2 time Pacific Coast Late Model/Winston West Champion driver, Jack McCoy, receiving the trophy after one of his short track wins in his fastback Dodge Charger. Jack still holds the record for wins in the series (now ARCA-West) at 54 - all in Dodges.

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Here is a picture of the FULL SIZED Plymouth Fury with a Hemi in it that Mr Maclaughlin mentions in the link in post #1. It was built and driven by Buck Baker.Chrysler maintained that their full sized cars would never be competitive but the article says that this car finished 2nd in a major Nascar race.



Another shot of the same car.

Great pic! I remember when the '65 Ford Galaxie was a popular car to use, such as for Ned Jarrett.
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Discussion Starter · #1,026 ·
Great pic! I remember when the '65 Ford Galaxie was a popular car to use, such as for Ned Jarrett.
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In '65, Ford had Nascar pretty much to themselves as Chrysler pulled it's backing from Nascar teams after Ol' Man France banned the Hemis. Lots of discussion of all that earlier in this thread but I see that a lot of my posted photos/pitures have been replaced with ads :(:mad:.
 

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Well, OK.......a little more as I remember it. The "Rich Howard" referred to in the article was Richard Howard, owner (or part owner) of Charlotte Motor Speedway before Bruton Smith. He never gave up on the idea of bringing back Chevys to increase the crowds and his gate receipts. In 1971, he basically funded the effort by Jr Johnson to build what later became known as the Coca-Cola Chebbie driven by Bobby Allison. An essential element of this story can be heard if you listen very carefully when they play the "Back in the Day" series on TV and do the show on this car, namely..............Jr Johnson admitting that he knew that his big-block Chebbie would not really be competitive against the Hemi powered Mopars and Fords and so went to Ol' man France and asked him to make "adjustments" (the word he uses in the TV interview) to the rules so that his Chebbie could run up front with the top cars. The result was the first use in Nascar of restrictor plates, specifically to cut the hp advantages of the Hemis. The Howard backed Chebbie (I believe that Charlie Glotzbach first drove it ) had such an advantage over the choked down Hemis that a nervous Bill France threw a restrictor plate at it also, but always with larger throttle bores than the Hemi cars were allowed. There was so much arguing and bickering over who had an advantage that Nascar was changing the sizes of the rp bore holes every few weeks to try to keep the competition even. If you look at the results from the '72 racing season, you can see that the big races were fairly evenly split between that Chebbie, Petty's Plymouth, and the Woods Bros. Mercury. By the end of that year, all the big blocks had been throttled down so far that Nascar engine builders began to realize that an unrestricted small block could make equal or greater hp. By the end of '73, everybody was using small blocks and the big-blocks were then banned forever by Nascar when it set the current 358" limit.
actually the FIRST use of restrictor plates started at the 2nd Michigan race of 1970.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,030 ·
Yes, I had failed to recall that but both "Fast Eddie" and "DC93" have since mentioned plates in that Michigan race earlier in this thread. However, in 1970, there were basically just 2 motors being used in Nascar Cup competition - the Chrysler and Ford Hemis, and both were assigned the same sized restrictor plates, so no brand was intentionally favored. The motivation was just to slow everybody down as there were concerns that the cars were getting just too fast for the tires to hold up safely. It was only after "Brand C" re-entered Cup competition in 1971 that Nascar began fooling with different sized plates for the different brands and I stand by my posting that "Brand C" was deliberately selected for advantages when it came to assigning restrictor plate sizes.
 
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