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What I find kinda amusing is Chrysler is always advertising the Pacifica on their Facebook page, but the plant hardly builds any. Seems like a waste of time to me.
 

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Yup. Or at least phase them out on luxury models.

Oddly enough I don't think it's a bad idea for government to lend a hand with infrastructure in some areas, there's a lot of precedent for that, e.g. the TVA, but there should be some way for the money to be paid back eventually.
Highways are something specifically mentioned in the constitution as something the federal government should be investing in. Unlike alternative propulsion systems and a whole bunch of other stuff.
 

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The fact that Chrysler is still alive says something for it's survivability and longevity despite having little product to sell. It will be quite a challenge to revive the brand but it is completely possible. Of course it will have to share platforms with other Stellantis brands but it should have it's own distinct look on the exterior. And Chrysler has a long history of pushing the technology envelope with engineering and styling. I say focus on that. Use styling cues from Chrysler's past such as the art deco look of the iconic Chrysler Building in NYC. Although all interior electronics will be shared with other Stellantis brands, make the interiors as plush as possible. Use a marketing campaign that plays off of the past bankruptcy as American Spirit never dies. Bring Chrysler back. It can be done and should be done. Stellantis knows that their largest market for selling product is the USA. They should be all about American history and Chrysler is a big part of that. Chrysler can fill that luxury segment for Stellantis in America if they so choose. And the luxury segment is the most profitable too.
 

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The fact that Chrysler is still alive says something for it's survivability and longevity despite having little product to sell. It will be quite a challenge to revive the brand but it is completely possible. Of course it will have to share platforms with other Stellantis brands but it should have it's own distinct look on the exterior. And Chrysler has a long history of pushing the technology envelope with engineering and styling. I say focus on that. Use styling cues from Chrysler's past such as the art deco look of the iconic Chrysler Building in NYC. Although all interior electronics will be shared with other Stellantis brands, make the interiors as plush as possible. Use a marketing campaign that plays off of the past bankruptcy as American Spirit never dies. Bring Chrysler back. It can be done and should be done. Stellantis knows that their largest market for selling product is the USA. They should be all about American history and Chrysler is a big part of that. Chrysler can fill that luxury segment for Stellantis in America if they so choose. And the luxury segment is the most profitable too.
Amen !!!
 

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One problem that has been around since the late 1950's is the creep upwards of lower tier brands into the mid-luxury brands turf. Dodge and Plymouth chased out DeSoto by 1960. and crept into Chrysler's in the 1970's. Chrysler brand chased out the Imperial by the early 1980's. Ford with the LTD in the mid-1960's crept into Mercury's turf. Chevy with the Caprice. Then there was creep from the mid-range brands into the lower tiers smaller cars sharing basic structures but different interior and exterior trim. This meant little difference in pricing and the mid-luxury brands suffering as buyers saw a better buy in the base brand with the same body, engines with premium trim sub-models. In the most recent years, even Jeep had gone into the premium-luxury class with its top trim models that Chrysler could have had and beyond to go against foreign brands like Audi, M-B, BMW, Land Rover SUV's/CUV's but with far better reliability and ability to fix.
 

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One problem that has been around since the late 1950's is the creep upwards of lower tier brands into the mid-luxury brands turf. Dodge and Plymouth chased out DeSoto by 1960. and crept into Chrysler's in the 1970's. Chrysler brand chased out the Imperial by the early 1980's. Ford with the LTD in the mid-1960's crept into Mercury's turf. Chevy with the Caprice. Then there was creep from the mid-range brands into the lower tiers smaller cars sharing basic structures but different interior and exterior trim. This meant little difference in pricing and the mid-luxury brands suffering as buyers saw a better buy in the base brand with the same body, engines with premium trim sub-models. In the most recent years, even Jeep had gone into the premium-luxury class with its top trim models that Chrysler could have had and beyond to go against foreign brands like Audi, M-B, BMW, Land Rover SUV's/CUV's but with far better reliability and ability to fix.
You are correct. The brands were not kept separate. A Chrysler should always be something more than the best Dodge. There was no need for Plymouth when Dodge went down and into that territory. No need for Pontiac and Oldsmobile when Chevy could go up and Buick down to cover those price ranges. Did all of this happen due to dealers demaning something to sell?
 

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You are correct. The brands were not kept separate. A Chrysler should always be something more than the best Dodge. There was no need for Plymouth when Dodge went down and into that territory. No need for Pontiac and Oldsmobile when Chevy could go up and Buick down to cover those price ranges. Did all of this happen due to dealers demaning something to sell?
In the case of the former ChryCo., Every time Plymouth was given some desirable new product, Dodge Division would moan, scream, and cry until management broke down and gave Dodge the exact same product.

This lack of exclusive desirable product for Plymouth was probably a key factor in the downfall of the division.
 

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In the case of the former ChryCo., Every time Plymouth was given some desirable new product, Dodge Division would moan, scream, and cry until management broke down and gave Dodge the exact same product.

This lack of exclusive desirable product for Plymouth was probably a key factor in the downfall of the division.
Once the Dodge division was no longer separate from Chrysler/Plymouth (with the push for all brands under one roof a few decades back) the need for Dodge and Plymouth duplicate models to exist (and to a lessor extent Dodge models duplicating Chrysler models).
 

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First, many brands accumulated due to mergers and acquisitions. This created overlap.

Second, when each brand had its own showroom and dealership, the overlap was competition. When the brands were consolidated under one roof, it caused overlap on the showroom floor.

We are not in a situation where overlap in the showroom is a problem. Chrysler and Dodge and Jeep can be distinct and separate under the same roof. Just eliminate the 2WD Jeeps and let Chrysler/Dodge cater to the mass market/performance market, leaving Jeep with the capability market.

Now, if they brought Peugeot, Citroen and DS into the showrooms, it would be a disaster of overlap. The new management does not seem to be stupid enough to try this.
 

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The fact that Chrysler is still alive says something for it's survivability and longevity despite having little product to sell. It will be quite a challenge to revive the brand but it is completely possible. Of course it will have to share platforms with other Stellantis brands but it should have it's own distinct look on the exterior. And Chrysler has a long history of pushing the technology envelope with engineering and styling. I say focus on that. Use styling cues from Chrysler's past such as the art deco look of the iconic Chrysler Building in NYC. Although all interior electronics will be shared with other Stellantis brands, make the interiors as plush as possible. Use a marketing campaign that plays off of the past bankruptcy as American Spirit never dies. Bring Chrysler back. It can be done and should be done. Stellantis knows that their largest market for selling product is the USA. They should be all about American history and Chrysler is a big part of that. Chrysler can fill that luxury segment for Stellantis in America if they so choose. And the luxury segment is the most profitable too.
The fact that Chrysler is still alive says something for it's survivability and longevity despite having little product to sell. It will be quite a challenge to revive the brand but it is completely possible. Of course it will have to share platforms with other Stellantis brands but it should have it's own distinct look on the exterior. And Chrysler has a long history of pushing the technology envelope with engineering and styling. I say focus on that. Use styling cues from Chrysler's past such as the art deco look of the iconic Chrysler Building in NYC. Although all interior electronics will be shared with other Stellantis brands, make the interiors as plush as possible. Use a marketing campaign that plays off of the past bankruptcy as American Spirit never dies. Bring Chrysler back. It can be done and should be done. Stellantis knows that their largest market for selling product is the USA. They should be all about American history and Chrysler is a big part of that. Chrysler can fill that luxury segment for Stellantis in America if they so choose. And the luxury segment is the most profitable too.
Well said! You’ve made the most sound argument I have read for why and how to keep Chrysler viable. Hope someone who’s writing the checks is listening.
 

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1974 Plymouth Valiant - 2013 Dodge Dart - 2013 Chrysler 300C
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Now, if they brought Peugeot, Citroen and DS into the showrooms, it would be a disaster of overlap. The new management does not seem to be stupid enough to try this.
I suspect they also would never have brought Chrysler and Dodge into the same showroom. In Europe they are clever enough to have competing brands which don't compete against each other.
 

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One problem that has been around since the late 1950's is the creep upwards of lower tier brands into the mid-luxury brands turf. Dodge and Plymouth chased out DeSoto by 1960. and crept into Chrysler's in the 1970's. Chrysler brand chased out the Imperial by the early 1980's. Ford with the LTD in the mid-1960's crept into Mercury's turf. Chevy with the Caprice. Then there was creep from the mid-range brands into the lower tiers smaller cars sharing basic structures but different interior and exterior trim. This meant little difference in pricing and the mid-luxury brands suffering as buyers saw a better buy in the base brand with the same body, engines with premium trim sub-models. In the most recent years, even Jeep had gone into the premium-luxury class with its top trim models that Chrysler could have had and beyond to go against foreign brands like Audi, M-B, BMW, Land Rover SUV's/CUV's but with far better reliability and ability to fix.
True about Dodge, Plymouth and DeSoto. Something entirely different was happening with Chrysler Imperial. This was marketing cutting off the halo and head of a division and turning it into a division on its own. Chrysler was not expanded into Imperial's turf, it was regaining what should never have been taken from it in the first place. This is completely analogous to Dodge Ram. People never stopped calling them Chrysler Imperials either.
 

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In the case of the former ChryCo., Every time Plymouth was given some desirable new product, Dodge Division would moan, scream, and cry until management broke down and gave Dodge the exact same product.

This lack of exclusive desirable product for Plymouth was probably a key factor in the downfall of the division.
Right. When a Valiant ran on a 106" wheelbase and a Dart on a 111" wheelbase or a Barracuda on a 108" wheelbase and a Challenger on a 110" wheelbase there was product differentiation. When the difference between a Sundance and a Shadow was chrome trim and grill texture there wasn't any reason to keep Plymouth.
 

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There is room for that. Jeep, off road, Dodge, go fast, Chrysler, cars and CUVs with style and comfort. The electrification should be decided by the market demands.
I couldn't agree more ......Chrysler needs something in the line/look of a Mercedes GLE Coupe GLS, GLS+ SUV (gas/elec/hybrid?)....I'm not talking Mercedes pricing or that level of quality.....just that you can't swing a dead cat here in central Pa without hitting one of those 3 or a BMW X series and I'm sure they could sell more than the 110,000+ units in 2020.

Just my cents
 

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I couldn't agree more ......Chrysler needs something in the line/look of a Mercedes GLE Coupe GLS, GLS+ SUV (gas/elec/hybrid?)....I'm not talking Mercedes pricing or that level of quality.....just that you can't swing a dead cat here in central Pa without hitting one of those 3 or a BMW X series and I'm sure they could sell more than the 110,000+ units in 2020.

Just my cents
Lets unpack that a little. Not Mercedes pricing or quality. More like some Acura/Lexus/Infiniti and Audi FWD/AWD vehicles. Which when you come right down to it are reskinned Honda/Toyota/Nissan/VW models. Which when you come right down to it is just copying Chrysler/Buick/Oldsmobile of the '80s.

Sorry, the luxury market just isn't that big. Over 100K last year: Tesla 3 137.750 Lexus RX 101.059 That's it. The best of the others were under 60K a year. If you want Chrysler/Buick '80s style sales levels, you need Chrysler/Buick affordable luxury pricing.
 
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