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I didn't read the whole thread here, but how about those upcoming urethane(?) no-air-pressure jobs? I wonder if the wear/reliability profiles of those will render spares/mini-spares/sealant cans/pressure gauges/etc. near-obsolete?! Whoa Nelly!
 

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Jeepophile said:
I didn't read the whole thread here, but how about those upcoming urethane(?) no-air-pressure jobs? I wonder if the wear/reliability profiles of those will render spares/mini-spares/sealant cans/pressure gauges/etc. near-obsolete?! Whoa Nelly!
Jeff2KPatriotBlue said:
Thanks for the links. For the record, I didn't like ABS brakes when they first came out either, but accept them now. :)

Another prospective technology is a "spoked" tire. This has a series of flexible "truss" structures in it, and doesn't use air pressure at all... will post a link when I find it.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/tweel-airless-tire.htm

here it is.
What I referred to above....
 

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acewiza said:
If they are good enough for Corvettes and BMWs they are good enough for me. :thumbsup:

(I bet my wife's BMW would run rings around your Challenger - on run flat tires!)
With all due respect---cars with the one-inch-or-so tall hip/cool/etc. tires that are becoming more common standard equipment these days are sitting ducks for the potholes that are increasingly part and parcel of cities/counties prioritizing their spending on things other than maintaining our roads. One pothole and your $600-and-up wheel and your $200-and-up tire are gone just like that! Very common occurence in the Greater L.A. area, for example. And I write this as a fairly careful-about-slamming-into-potholes driver.

That is one reason I stick with vehicles with more traditional, more forgiving, taller profile tires---at least until perhaps they perfect the multispoke/urethane(?)/whatever-they-call-them tire-less wheels. And yes, til then I'll also stick with a full-size, 5th matching-wheel tire I can rotate with the other four, and which gives me a one-tire hedge against tire model changes that often occur before you wear out a set of tires----when you get a non-repairable flat in those cases, beyond the wear difference in new vs used tires, you get a different-looking/handling/wearing new tire vs. the other three. For my 10-year-plus-old vehicle, I actually have 6 matching tires/wheels that I rotate (keeping the 6th one sealed in big trash bags between rotations to reduce deterioration).

Lawyer-required disclaimer (heh, heh): directional and different size front vs. rear tires, etc. can call for a somewhat different discussion, no?!
 

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[SIZE=12pt](I have only read about a quarter of the posts on this thread, so if my points below were already covered by somebody else---my bad.)[/SIZE]
[SIZE=12pt]HOW DO YOU DEFINE A FLAT?[/SIZE]
[SIZE=12pt]I’ve always had a full-size, matching wheel-and-tire spare in my 45+ years of driving, and have always paid attention to air pressure, even with onboard sensors, I carry at least two gauges (hand gauges can be notoriously unreliable, can’t they!). I’ve always carried a matching spare tire for the trailer when towing. For about the past 20 years, I’ve always carried two cans of tire sealant with each vehicle, and swapped those cans for new ones every four or five years. I’ve always changed tires when the wear depth so indicated. I’ve only had a literal “flat tire” about three (or four?) times in my life:[/SIZE]
  1. [SIZE=12pt] 40+yrs ago—car---highway—easy spare change-out.[/SIZE]
  2. [SIZE=12pt]About 28 years ago---found out hard way that those handsome, aftermarket white-lettered, two-ply-sidewall tires I inherited with a used pickup weren’t meant for carrying loads that the pickup itself was rated for! Thank god only one tire blew out before I changed to load-appropriate tires.[/SIZE]
  3. [SIZE=12pt]About 17 years ago, one riding partner somehow [/SIZE]managed (?!) to run over a spike about a half-inch diameter offroad on one of my motorcycles (my bike, my flat, no?). The hole was so big that the Slime I run in my bikes couldn’t seal the leak. Luckily we were only about four miles from my truck, so were able to limp back to it. Again, this was an offroad motorcycle tire.
[SIZE=12pt]BUTTTTT----My wife’s cars have gotten at least two nails in tires per year (about 18k to 20k miles per year). Before I reduced my driving mileage, I’d also averaged about two nails per year in my own vehicles. My practice is to inspect the tires and check pressure at least once per month, even with the onboard pressure sensors. If there’s a nail, I immediately put on the spare, mark the nailed tire with tire crayon for the nail location, and get said tire fixed if advisable or otherwise replace it. I DON’T WAIT FOR THE TIRE TO BE FLAT. Luckily the nails have usually been kind enough to appear (heh,heh,heh) when the vehicle was close to home which is also close to tire shop.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=12pt]THE POINT IS, I WANT TO BE PREPARED FROM THE TIME BEFORE I PURCHASE THE VEHICLE, ALL THE WAY TIL I SELL IT. AND I DON’T WANT TO PLAY WITH DARING MY TIRES TO FAIL. UNTIL THE URETHANE/WHATEVER, SPOKED, AIRLESS WHEEL/TIRE IS PERFECTED (AND MAYBE EVEN AFTER IT IS PERFECTED) GIVE ME A FULL-SIZE SPARE—AND I’LL PAY FOR IT.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=12pt]Folks who always drive in an urban bubble or on an interstate with service available every few miles are more likely to get away with not having a full-size spare. But I’ll stick with mine.[/SIZE]

[SIZE=12pt]If you include counting nails in tires--whether with appreciable lost pressure or not--- as “flats”, I’ve had probably over 100 “flats” in my driving life, averaging about two “flats” per year per vehicle.[/SIZE]
 

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I don't know how many cases it applies to, but on my "new" KK, the spare mounting hardware only allows for mounting with the valve stem up against the body, where pressure cannot be checked without lowering the spare down. Also, I've seen cars (can't remember make/model) where the same "no valve stem access" spare mounting hardware in trunk applies---it in those cases was not just how the factory installed them--they were designed that way---as I think previous poster implied/stated.
 
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